Honda CBR 250 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

Been riding my 2013 CBR250R for about 3 months now. I have completed the MSF Basic Rider course and was a good experience. Now I am slowly hitting the streets around my area, pushing myself a little further each day and getting comfortable with the bike.

My question is regarding RPM power in second gear. Say I am slowing down to take a 90 degree corner or enter a parking lot or shopping area, I feel like the bike looses power drastically and the rpms fall fast and the bike start to chugging as I enter the parking lot.

I have realized that below 4000rpms, the bike loses power and start lugging. What are some recommendations or advice on this situation? The other day I was entering Walgreens parking lot and went down to 2nd gear, but to prevent the bike from chugging I had to slip the clutch in the friction zone to keep the power up.

Thank you for your time. All the best
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
I'm tagging along this thread to see the experts' recommendations. What I used to do on my 125 was 'feather' the clutch in 2nd gear to maintain smooth acceleration. On the 250, the RPM's are a little lower, but I still feather to maintain the smoothness, but not as much as on the 125.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,965 Posts
You'll have to keep the clutch in the friction zone when doing a sharp 90° turn. The spacing of the gears is a bit funny there. One is usually too fast to shift into first gear but too slow for releasing the clutch all the way in second.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Feather clutch and easy on the throttle, you may need to drop into first.
There is a funny thing between first and second. I loved second gear on my FZ1, which could go from slow speed turns at intersections all the way up to 80 mph!
I do like the overall power and torque of the cbr250 though, which is plenty perky for 90% of the riding I do.
Ride more, you will get the feel of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
You'll have to keep the clutch in the friction zone when doing a sharp 90° turn. The spacing of the gears is a bit funny there. One is usually too fast to shift into first gear but too slow for releasing the clutch all the way in second.
I'd go to first....dont like slipping clutch unless I have to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
If you downshift to first while moving at too fast of a speed, you risk locking up the rear tire if you release the clutch too quickly.

I would recommend slipping the clutch in second gear - that is what the clutch is made for.

I only shift down to first if I know I am going to be coming to a stop.
+1 couldn't have said it better myself
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
If it is a smooth turn I stay on second, if the RPMs fall to low I feather the clutch and give it some gas to increase the RPMs. As the bike gets speed I slowly release the clutch. If the right turn is a drive way with a bump I may downshift to first, but this is a leaned skill that takes practice. I would suggest to practice downshifting in a parking lot at slow speeds. If not done properly you will drop the bike.
I got my license in California and at the time I could not afford the MSF course, so I had to learn to use the clutch to pass the Skills test. If you get out of the like or put your foot down you fail. When I took this tests you had to go around 3 times.
If you practice riding your bike in a circle you will master the clutch at low speeds while leaning.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2w_s0DNaJSA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks everyone for your replies! I appreciate you taking the time to reply and help out. I will definitely take the advice and put it into practice on the bike.

All the best!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,226 Posts
good advice..
practice specific slow [walking pace] riding
[somewhere quiet] in first gear..
use clutch, throttle and trailing rear brake
for control of speed and forward momentum..

dont worry about instant success, just go for
smoothness, using clutch, with little throttle
movement.. high speed requires throttle
low speed requires clutch control..

object to begin with is feeling, how smooth
small control movements of clutch lever
cause easy smooth forward movement
at low to very low [walking]speed..

it really doesnt take a big effort to
start developing control of slow riding
in 1st, together with better smoother
control of power and momentum thru
smoother more precise clutch [and throttle]
movements.. theres no hurry in this..

its not a test.. doesnt matter if you need to
speed up a bit, which simply feeds back more
info to your brain which is drinking it all in..
like other areas of motorcycle control
this is also brain training..

before you start, just let yourself relax a bit..
even if your relaxed already, just let yourself
relax a bit more, a few easy gentle breathes,
which is a cue for brain [and a good habit]..

slow riding is a skill, and function of control
of the motorcycle.. its a very useful skill
in general riding, such as entry to parks etc
as you mention, but also in traffic and
suchlike situations.. very handy..

when you have developed your slow riding
from starting in first, this will transfer
to riding between first and second..

clutch as members note is intended for,
controlling flow of engine power thru
degrees of friction.. such clutch use
is not,, abuse, but design function..

lugging the engine stresses drivetrain
unnecessarily, which is worse, and 'bad'..
its also loss of control of your motorcycle..

slow riding practice is not dangerous or
high risk yet is fundamentally important
for development of smooth control
of your motorcycle.. [and 'fun']
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,789 Posts
If you find that changing down from 2nd to first's a bit clunky, try doing it without closing the throttle. By that I mean if you're doing a constant speed in second, or you're gently decelerating, don't close the throttle when you change down to first. You'll find that it's much smoother. When you do need to accelerate or decelerate when riding slowly, open and close the throttle gently. This will also make your ride smoother. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thank you again for the replies. Yes, practice will help and I need to work on better throttle control. For example, when I am taking a slow right hand turn in second gear at a smaller street in my neighborhood , i feel like the rpm's drop when i am at 12-14 mph and the bike is powerless taking the turn and I feel the bike lugging or chugging, so i slip the clutch to bring up the rpms in second gear. I don't have that smooth turn in second gear without jerking. Something I need to work on and improve.

Thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,226 Posts
if you can ride the motorcycle,,
everything skill can be improved
and refined, by practice..

breaking it down and repeating it..
as the old saying observes;
'practice makes perfect'
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
feathering the clutch can be a good thing. slow speed handling carries over to medium/high speed riding as well. you're getting to know your engine and friction zone, and it will help you greatly, especially for city riding. keep practicing; it sounds like you're on your way more than you know!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
i used to feather the clutch when doing sharp turns, or opt for rev matching first. whenever i switched over to my 13t sprocket, i found that second gear is much more usable with less of that "oh crap im going to stall" feeling on slow-speed maneuvers.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top