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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Here in Florida, underlights aren't technically legal, but aren't technically illegal either. It's one of those grey areas where it kinda depends on how the cop feels about it.

I don't actually have a CBR yet - I'm waiting for the 2012s to become availible before making the leap - so I just have a few questions for those who know the shape of the bike and where things could be added.

To make them legal, I'd just have the lights to the rear of the bike, and have them functioning as red tail-lights (which just happen to give me that nice look). :D I managed to find the attached picture somewhere (don't remember where) and the rear LED lighting should be passable as a tail light.

So, would it be practical to simply connect a strip of red LEDs under the rear fender (the color I want anyway) and into the tail-light circuit? And could I get enough light emanating from the bike from this position to get the right look?

What about the front fairing light? What do you guys think of that? I couldn't make as strong an argument that it's functioning as a rear-facing tail-light, though I'd really like the red. Do those gaps go all the way through (would the lights be visible from the front of the bike) or does the plastic curve? If it goes through, I could have some front-facing, white LED strips (which just happen to give me a white glow through the back of fairing). The Red/White combo fits the bike anyway. And again, doable or tons of work?

Thanks!
 

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Here in Florida, underlights aren't technically legal, but aren't technically illegal either. It's one of those grey areas where it kinda depends on how the cop feels about it.

I don't actually have a CBR yet - I'm waiting for the 2012s to become availible before making the leap - so I just have a few questions for those who know the shape of the bike and where things could be added.

To make them legal, I'd just have the lights to the rear of the bike, and have them functioning as red tail-lights (which just happen to give me that nice look). :D I managed to find the attached picture somewhere (don't remember where) and the rear LED lighting should be passable as a tail light.

So, would it be practical to simply connect a strip of red LEDs under the rear fender (the color I want anyway) and into the tail-light circuit? And could I get enough light emanating from the bike from this position to get the right look?

What about the front fairing light? What do you guys think of that? I couldn't make as strong an argument that it's functioning as a rear-facing tail-light, though I'd really like the red. Do those gaps go all the way through (would the lights be visible from the front of the bike) or does the plastic curve? If it goes through, I could have some front-facing, white LED strips (which just happen to give me a white glow through the back of fairing). The Red/White combo fits the bike anyway. And again, doable or tons of work?

Thanks!
Red and Blue lights are illegal no matter what. Even used as a brake light since they are not factory. Those colors are reserved for emergency vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If that were true, every car on the road would be illegal. Not to mention you can buy thousands of aftermarket LED brakelight strips (among a whole host of other types/shapes). I find it hard to believe that so many products would be made/sold commercially if they were illegal.
 

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If that were true, every car on the road would be illegal. Not to mention you can buy thousands of aftermarket LED brakelight strips (among a whole host of other types/shapes). I find it hard to believe that so many products would be made/sold commercially if they were illegal.
Why would you be surprised, it's how it is. 98% of those will say for off road use only.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
To put it bluntly, you're wrong. The only restrictions on what I'm wanting to do, put a certified, second, legal taillight on my bike is that it needs to be above a certain height (non issue) and cannot be visible when the bike is viewed from the front. There are literally thousands of products which meet these requirements and have the proper shape to put light downward as well as back.

I just need to know if the shape of the bike would allow enough light to around the tire/swing arm/etc to give an underglow-like effect.
 

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To put it bluntly, you're wrong. The only restrictions on what I'm wanting to do, put a certified, second, legal taillight on my bike is that it needs to be above a certain height (non issue) and cannot be visible when the bike is viewed from the front. There are literally thousands of products which meet these requirements and have the proper shape to put light downward as well as back.

I just need to know if the shape of the bike would allow enough light to around the tire/swing arm/etc to give an underglow-like effect.
It doesn't even really matter whether the light itself is certified as a brake light. You are using it for a purpose other then what it was designed for so it will now be classified as an underglow light. Now it falls under a different category and therefore still illegal.
http://www.ehow.com/list_6452843_florida-vehicle-underglow-laws.html

It's a dumb look at me ricer mod anyways.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If someone would read what I write instead of just the first line, maybe I could get a decent answer...

I want to mount a second brake light underneath the second seat/rear fender area. As long as I can position it where it is visible/unobstructed from behind. It is completely legal for me to do so. End of story.

The fact some light will escapes to the side and gives me a nice look similar to underlights is irrelevant. If this were true, 90% of vehicles would be illegal straight from the factory. Your bike would be illegal if this were true, since I can see the brake light from the side.

All I wanted to know was if the shape of the bike would accommodate such a setup. Looks like answering that question is too hard, though, since it would require actually reading my posts.

316.224 said:
(2) Rear clearance lamps, identification lamps, and those marker lamps and reflectors mounted on the rear or on the sides near the rear of a vehicle shall display or reflect a red color.
Rear-facing lights should be red. I thought it was rather obvious taillights are supposed to be this color/are legal in this color, considering that's what every car on the road uses, but you seem to think otherwise so I thought I'd make it even more obvious.

316.410 said:
(1) Every motorcycle and motor-driven cycle shall have at least one taillamp which shall be located at a height of not more than 72 nor less than 20 inches.
So as long as it's higher than a foot below the seat and not on a pole, I'm fine.

316.234 said:
Any vehicle may be equipped and, when required under this chapter, shall be equipped with a stop lamp or lamps on the rear of the vehicle which shall display a red or amber light, visible from a distance of not less than 300 feet to the rear in normal sunlight, and which shall be actuated upon application of the service (foot) brake, and which may but need not be incorporated with one or more other rear lamps. An object, material, or covering that alters the stop lamp’s visibility from 300 feet to the rear in normal sunlight may not be placed, displayed, installed, affixed, or applied over a stop lamp.
Stop lights can't be obstructed, and must be visible from a good distance. When you put a bright light on something, the light typically spreads out until it hits the ground. Revolutionary physics, I know, but it's true. Some of the light will hit the ground next to the bike!

316.2397 said:
(1) No person shall drive or move or cause to be moved any vehicle or equipment upon any highway within this state with any lamp or device thereon showing or displaying a red or blue light visible from directly in front thereof except for certain vehicles hereinafter provided.
(2) It is expressly prohibited for any vehicle or equipment, except police vehicles, to show or display blue lights. However, vehicles owned, operated, or leased by the Department of Corrections or any county correctional agency may show or display blue lights when responding to emergencies.
1) The light won't be visible from the front, as it's behind a person and 300 pounds of steel. I know physics aren't your strong suit, but bear with me. The light will be blocked by these solid objects. Any light on the pavement would be obscured by the headlamp, and if you go out, turn on your car lights at night, you'll see red light on the pavement behind it. Are you allowed to drive it on the road? Yeah.
2) I don't want blue, nor was it ever mentioned in any of my posts.

Goodbye CBR250.net. I do not enjoy repeating myself, and can see I'm not going to get any answers other than people who think ehow.com somehow has more weight than the Florida statues. Good luck on the roads out there. With your understanding of physics, you'll probably need it.
 
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