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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there,

New to the forum, have a only a year of riding behind me, though I am a careful rider, and got alot out of the courses I did.

I am a commuter mainly, and find the cbr125 struggles on the freeway uphill to get to 100km/h.

From my simplistic research it seems like for bang for buck, the cbr250 *may* be a good upgrade for me and solve this problem. Fuel economy is important, and I want to be able to at least go up the hills on the freeway!

Apologies if this is a stupid question, though is simply moving up to a cbr250 going to be enough? Or shoudl I be aiming higher? (though higher fuel costs, registration etc.)
I am 80kg, 170cms high. The fit of the CBR125 seems perfect for me, no complaints there.

Any advice would be appreciated.

Cheers

Steve
 

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Welcome, now you can go up hills at 150kph and still use stuff all fuel.
 

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Welcome aboard matey. The CBR 250R will cruise at 70 mph all day very easily. I commute around 30 miles a day, 15 of those are on motorway, with a few relatively steep hills, and my bike has no problem at all with this. You could probably cruise at 80 mph, if you wanted, but it's starting to sound a bit busy, at that speed, and your fuel consumption would suffer. This is a very cheap bike to run, not much more than a 125. If you jump to a 600, you're talking small family car running costs, when you factor in servicing etc. I'm averaging 82 mpg (imperial) by the way.
 

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I am a commuter mainly, and find the cbr125 struggles on the freeway uphill to get to 100km/h.
If you have survived a year on the 125 then the CBR250R will be more than enough and seem like a top of the line bike in comparrison. No need for the extra power, cost, and gas of a 650 for solo commuting unless you really need to run faster than 135kph all the time. The 250 has bigger tires so the trucks won't blow you around as much, more power and low end torque, more substantial forks, better aerodynamics and rain protection and almost as good on gas. There is no other bike that can do what the CBR250R does for a solo rider for so little money. The Ninja has a higher top speed but is slower around town and gets 20% less fuel economy. If it is still carbureted where you are, I wouldn't want it at all. Very cold blooded.
 

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I made that exact transition last May. The 250 should be all you need for commuting. It will maintain 120-130 kph under the worst conditions (strong headwind, uphill). The sort of conditions that would have you tucked on the 125 to keep above 90.

I posted about the transition on a Canadian CBR125 forum: Third times the charm - found a CBR125 replacement - Honda CBR125R Community Forum

Brief observations were:

You will feel right at home on this bike. You will need to make minor adjustments with your right wrist, left foot and eyes:
  • you will discover a range of useful throttle positions between idle and wide open, even at highway speeds
  • you will shift far less
  • you will need to pay more attention to the speedometer, even at highway speeds
 

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Welcome to the forum! I own a 2009 CBR125R that has recently received an engine swap (150cc). The reason for the swap was to make it easier for me to ride at highway speeds when I'm touring with the bike and carrying a full load of camping gear. The extra 24cc and 4 valve engine nets me about 5 extra horsepower (peak) - but just as important - the extra displacement provides more torque at highway speeds.

One thing to consider, if you haven't done so already is to replace your 15T (stock) countershaft sprocket with a 14T (one tooth less). Very easy and inexpensive upgrade. Even at 80kgs - you should notice a difference. This will reduce the bike's effective top speed a little - but will significantly improve acceleration in 6th gear on the highway and require less shifting if you find yourself inadvertently slowing down on the highway when you shift into 6th. It will also make the bike feel more spirited when riding around town. For me - it also improved fuel economy because it allowed me to use 6th gear on the highway. Previously I had to ride in 5th gear much of the time to maintain highway speeds. Also - an aftermarket windscreen may be an option as well. With the CBR125R - tucking behind the windscreen won't necessarily increase your top speed - but it will allow you to get there quicker and help you maintain your speed on the highway much better. I have a Puig screen for my CBR125R, but am currently exploring options to replace it with one that provides even more protection (wider). With these options - I could cruise at highway speeds between 100km/hr - 110km/hr much more easily in a tucked and semi-tucked position (and sitting straight up), and I weigh 10 kgs more than you. I could climb hills on the highway in 6th gear easier too.

What about the CBR250R? Well - when I first rode it on the highway - I found myself laughing in my helmet. It has so much more torque than the CBR125R, that it easily cruises at 100km/hr - sitting straight up on the bike. With no drama. It is quiet and relaxed at this speed compared to the CBR125R also. And the CBR250R can easily accelerate from this speed into the 130km/hr range to overtake other vehicles if needed - in 6th gear. Compared to the CBR125R it really is a torque monster for a 250cc single-cylinder. The stock suspension on the CBR250R is better too. And based on my own experience - I find the CBR250R yields only a 10% fuel economy penalty compared to the CBR125R under most conditions - yet produces twice as much rear-wheel horsepower. I feel that is a pretty favourable tradeoff between performance and fuel economy. And that tradeoff might be even less when out on the roadway, because all the highway fuel economy figures I've obtained for my CBR125R involved me laying on the tank in a tucked position much of the time, whereas the fuel economy numbers for my CBR250R at similar speeds were obtained with me sitting up (like a parachute) into the wind - creating more drag.

So if you really find riding the CBR125R frustrating - and find the challenge of trying to extract all of its peformance on the highway extremely aversive - and are just longing for a bike that preserves many of the best traits of the CBR125R yet cruises at highway speeds much more comfortably - you will undoubtedly be very pleased with the CBR250R.

Mike
 

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I made that exact transition last May. The 250 should be all you need for commuting. It will maintain 120-130 kph under the worst conditions (strong headwind, uphill). The sort of conditions that would have you tucked on the 125 to keep above 90.

I posted about the transition on a Canadian CBR125 forum: Third times the charm - found a CBR125 replacement - Honda CBR125R Community Forum

Brief observations were:


You will feel right at home on this bike. You will need to make minor adjustments with your right wrist, left foot and eyes:
  • you will discover a range of useful throttle positions between idle and wide open, even at highway speeds
  • you will shift far less
  • you will need to pay more attention to the speedometer, even at highway speeds
Geastman - I would like to officially nominate your posting on the CBR125R forum as the single best post of 2011 on that site.

Mike
 

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I think this cbr250r is a perfect commuter. whilst i've only ridden 350miles on this bike in the short time i've owned it, i am very impressed with it. handles well, fantastic fuel consumption, will handle legal speed limits with ease and above all very fun to ride.

sure i could ride a faster bike but i'm too tight to get 40mpg using a 600cc that only feels comfy doing 50mph+ and will definately loose me my life or license.

250cc ftw!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Wow - Thank you so much guys. Too many contributions (in such a short time) to thank individually but I really appreciate this :)

I went with the 125r as I had ZERO experience on motorbikes, and a complete novice in the largest form of the word. (despite numerous friends saying go for a 250, you will grow out of the 125 too quickly etc. - which I didnt disagree with them). The 125r has been a fantastic bike the learn on, it has taught me alot and generally it feels like a great little unit.

My riding position I am conscious of as well - and the angle of my back - I could see leaning forward could be a problem. The positioning that I can see on Motorcycle Ergonomics seems to be pretty much the same as the 125r, which is another sellign point (in addition to all the sales points you guys have brought up here).

I am tempted alot by the ABS version of it. Or should I hang on for the 2012 version of it to come out - or pick up a 2011 now as they would be looking to run out the 2011 model?

Opinions?

Thanks again

Cheers

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ok guys, I took the plunge and went with the abs model.obviously running in at the moment but feels pretty good to me! Thumpier compared to the cbr125, and no effort getting up hills when it would be trying to extra every last ounce of power out of the cbr125.

Thanks again for your help, big assistance with my decision.

Cheers

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Its been a while so I thought I would give you an update since you guys gave me such great advice.

First ride was - wow a bit different to the 125...the 125 felt like a lawnmover held together with steel cables in comparison. This bike feels much better built, and has the oomph when required. After the first 1000KM service it felt even better - obviously things had been tightened up etc.

I still dont take it above 6000 rpm, and find this is more than enough.

The fuel economy is pretty good at 3l/100km, which makes it a no brainer to take out. Cold weather doesnt bother me and unless Im doing a double shift at work (fatigue) I will take it out regardless.

In wet weather, as with all bikes I guess, I have to be exceptionally careful with the amount of rubber on the road isnt that much etc. and I ride accordingly (regardless of the people on 4 wheels who do not drive to the conditions of the road). Some days I just wont take it out and err on the side of caution.

In all, an absolutely fabulous bike, that is a joy to ride. This one is a keeper, and thank you again for giving me such great guidance. Im glad I started on the 125 (as I was, and still am, a very novice rider) but I am very happy to have moved to this bike. I cannot see myself moving to anything else anytime soon either.

Appreciated.

Cheers

Steve
 

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I am so glad that there is a "GANG" of ex-CBR125r owners on here !!!! LOL

I too loved my 08 CBR125r BUT just wanted better highway manners !!! I too like "touring" on my little bike AND my new (a week old) 2012 CBR250r is going to be just the ticket !!! I have only about 300 kms on the bike (it's been busy with work this week :mad:) but in those few kms, I have really liked how the bike preforms and runs !!! Hope to put many,many miles on it this summer !!
I still have my 08 CBR125r in the garage...couldn't bring myself to trade it in on the 250. I WILL shed a tear when I sell it though ....it's been a great bike !!! :(
 

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If I found a used CBR125 in Canada, is it even possible to import it here?
I don't know !!!

BUT if you can...I will sell you mine !!!
All you have to do is PAY for my WHOLE trip down to deliver it to you !! LOL :D:D
And NO !!!! I won't ship it !!!!!! LOL :eek:
 

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I wonder if they'd let me title a Canadian VIN number in my state.

I would totally go all the way to Alberta to get my hands on one of these.:p

Looks like 2400 miles from me. Now that's a trip.

I have too much of a fascination with smaller bikes.
 
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