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Has anyone taken the MSF advanced rider course? I'm wondering what you learn and if it's worth taking? I'm looking to do it around the Los Angeles Area.
 

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It is a half day of head drill and a half day of riding. Trail braking is finally introduced and "approved". Emphasis is upon avoiding getting into sticky situations. It seemed well worth my time and money.

Oopsie. That is the Arizona version. The CA version should be much better with the new CA provider.
 

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Back when I took it in the Eighties, it was called the Better Biker Course, and yes, it is well worth the time.
All I remember was we used our own bikes, it was on a small parking lot, so it was mostly slow-speed maneuvering and braking...and it was hot! ;)

TOTALLY worth your time and money.

I am seriously overdue for a refresher, but I am going to start with the beginner course again, because I believe when it comes to life-or-death, there is no such thing as too much education.
 

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Whats the difference between that and the street rider course 2?
I wouldn't go so much by the name. There are basically 3 tiers of education in the U.S., that I know of...

1. Basic MSF Rider course
2. Experienced Rider course
3. Closed-course (track) training

When I went to the MSF website and put in my zip code to see courses available in my area, I saw they offer this valuable course for the brand new to motorcycling individual:

Introductory Motorcycle Experience

A two-hour, first-touch experience with a motorcycle and not designed to teach a person to ride. As a familiarization program that points out the primary parts and controls of a typical motorcycle, it helps a potential rider determine whether motorcycling is a good personal choice. A person is given the option to manipulate the controls while astride a motorcycle, and is led into a BRC as a formal way to learn to ride. Also embedded in the experience is a self-assessment component to ensure a person is aware of the risks and requirements for being a good, safe and responsible rider.
 

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Whats the difference between that and the street rider course 2?
I misspoke myself above.
After looking over that link (for courses available in MY area...), I see the following tiers:

Introductory Motorcycle Experience

Basic RiderCourse

Basic RiderCourse 2 - Skills Practice

Advanced RiderCourse

and then, from there, are your track courses.
 

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When should a newbie think about taking the Advanced Rider Course. I took the Basic Course back in late-March and have about 800 miles of riding under my belt. I'm averaging about 150 miles a week right now and am thinking about the next round of training.
 

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When should a newbie think about taking the Advanced Rider Course. I took the Basic Course back in late-March and have about 800 miles of riding under my belt. I'm averaging about 150 miles a week right now and am thinking about the next round of training.
The basic 2 course is the old"experienced rider" course. It is taught on the tarmac, lasts one day, and you use your own bike.

That would be your next step, but, I would wait until you have ridden a year+ or over 6K miles.

For street riders, David L. Hough's books provide a lot of insight on traffic and safety as well as technique.

The police rider's handbook to better motorcycling (http://tsoshop.co.uk) is dry as heck, but is filled with good stuff. I have the previous edition, so, YMMV. That old edition is ISBN 9780113411436, which they still sell.
 

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Anybody who says wait I disagree with, take it now. If you get above 65 every day, and you take many corners every day, there is no reason that you shouldn't take this when it is offered. You may want to try some longer trips, and obviously read proficient motorcycling cover to cover as well.

Obviously, you think that you might personally benefit from it, and it's not a huge investment in money. If you manage to avoid the simplest fender bender because of being a little more conscious or skilled, that makes it very worth it, right?
 

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Anybody who says wait I disagree with, take it now. If you get above 65 every day, and you take many corners every day, there is no reason that you shouldn't take this when it is offered. You may want to try some longer trips, and obviously read proficient motorcycling cover to cover as well.

Obviously, you think that you might personally benefit from it, and it's not a huge investment in money. If you manage to avoid the simplest fender bender because of being a little more conscious or skilled, that makes it very worth it, right?
I agree. Many riders I know take it every couple years just to stay fresh.......and it gets you a discount on most motorcycle insurance.
 

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Sadly no one in my city offers the class. When I asked them about it they said they don't do it very often and should just take the brc1 again... Thinking of going to race school.
 

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A fourth kind of training that I wish we had here in the USA, and that I see in the UK is out on the street. I feel fortunate that there is a new organization called the Empire State Motorcycle Safety Education Program starting up here in New York. They do free training in libraries and the instructor mentioned that they are developing a street course. From their website, "ESMSEP is in the process of developing a riding program called SkilledRider Safety Tours to get you out of the parking lot with real time road riding to widen your awareness and skill development." I think this is a much needed service and really, we can't wait for the MSF to do everything.

This may be something that others can ask local schools about. I think it's a huge hole in our training that could be filled.
 

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I've take the California ARC and the MSRC and I enjoyed them. However I wouldn't pay for them (in the military so they were provided free). The things they teach you can be learned in a parking lot with some friends and some youtube. If you are in socal, there's a really good track riding course up here at willow springs. Good luck!
 
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