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It is by sheer luck I found this Forum and I have spent a lot of time reading about the CBR250R and it seems there is still a lot of love for this Bike
I am looking to purchase a second hand CBR250R which is 2011 and has done 29000 kms
Is that a good number?

What additional costs should I be worried about after I get this bike as I plan to use it for another 5 years or so.

Is there anything I should know beforehand while checking out the motorcycle?

I'm 6'1 about 199 pounds (90kilos)
 

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I am looking to purchase a second hand CBR250R which is 2011 and has done
29000 kms Is that a good number?
What additional costs should I be worried about after I get this bike as I plan to use it for another 5 years or so.
Is there anything I should know beforehand while checking out the motorcycle?

I'm 6'1 about 199 pounds (90kilos)
That's about 18,000 mi, which isn't an issue if it has been maintained properly.

At this point it needs new tires if they are more than 5 years old or so. Good tires are important.

Look at the chain and sprockets. If they are a mess it tells you that much of the basic maintenance may not have been done. Look inside the tank for rust. Look at the condition of the oil. Listen to it run - does it sound good?

At about 200 pounds you are not going to get much in the way of acceleration from the 250. It's going to take a while to get to highways speeds and the CBR isn't the best for extended high speed riding.

If that's not an issue, then no problem - just something to consider depending on your needs.
 

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Do check out online website for overall idea. Search from different cities location to get fair idea about what should be current buying price with respect to km reading. Buying an old CBR250R is definitely worth as there is no comparison of this to any other 250cc available in India. It will be great help to you if source cbr mechanic at the time of first visit (just visit big Honda workshop and ask for expert mechanic) 200-300rs can save you from big trouble.
If haven't heard the name Xbhp forum, do visit.
 

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just for example
Today normal price in russia - 160000 -180000 russian rubls. ( 2011-2013 / 15000-25000 kms )
 

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I purchased a cbr250ra 18months ago. I've never had abs cut in but I noticed the calliper is a six piston off a hot hatch (most probably). It certainly has impressive stopping power that has prevented a certain collision from occurring. A Honda CRV pulled out in front of me and I was so sure that we would collide. But I pulled up with a metre to spare. Fewwww. For this reason I would definately recommend the abs model.
 

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these bikes can go 100000km easily with routine maintenance. After purchase, plan on doing all maintenance items: oil, coolant, brake-fluid, brake-pads, tyres, etc. Never know when something was skipped by previous owner.
 

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I purchased a cbr250ra 18months ago. I've never had abs cut in but I noticed the calliper is a six piston off a hot hatch (most probably). It certainly has impressive stopping power that has prevented a certain collision from occurring. A Honda CRV pulled out in front of me and I was so sure that we would collide. But I pulled up with a metre to spare. Fewwww. For this reason I would definately recommend the abs model.
The CBR250RA ABS front caliper is a three-piston type actually. The center piston is linked to the rear brakes and the outer two pistons are controlled by the front brake lever. If you only use the rear brake pedal, pressure will be applied to the front caliper center piston after a 0.25 second delay. Best practice for maximum stopping power is of course to use both front and rear brakes together.

On the track, the non-ABS may provide greater stopping power because the front lever is able to generate more pressure over the smaller pad area. However on the street I definitely prefer ABS for dealing with unexpected low-traction surfaces while braking.
 

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the front lever is able to generate more pressure over the smaller pad area.
Dividing the force into a larger area of the larger pad reduces wear on the pad, and does not create more braking force. A change in pressure does not change the coefficient of friction, which remains constant, the normol force also remains constant, so the braking force is the same. The entire system without ABS Vs' with ABS, the pistons and the pump, are different in diameters, therefore it is not possible to compare the two systems based only on the different size of the Ped.

ABS systems help especially on motorcycles where the feel of the front brakes does not exist as in the Harley-Davidson family, Adventure-Motorcycles segment have also a "feeling" problem, etc. In our CBR250R we have a pretty good idea of what happens with the front brakes, so in this model the advantage of the ABS system is marginal compared to the cons (and there are some cons).
 

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In the early days of this forum there were several members who were racing on the track, and they did not like the ABS system for racing. In racing, you do not want to or need to use the rear pedal at all. Track riders of our bike reported that with the ABS front caliper you cannot generate the same braking force as the non-ABS when using only the front hand lever.
 

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In the early days of this forum there were several members who were racing on the track, and they did not like the ABS system for racing. In racing, you do not want to or need to use the rear pedal at all. Track riders of our bike reported that with the ABS front caliper you cannot generate the same braking force as the non-ABS when using only the front hand lever.
The distribution of braking power between the front brake and the rear brake, in the annual test of the motorcycle, is 20% rear, and 80% front. It is very easy to lock the rear brake also not on the racetrack, so it is very inefficient. It is possible to achieve 100% effective braking power with proper use of the front brake, and this is also true for riding on a regular road and not on the racetrack. What spoils the braking ability of ABS systems in motorcycles, is the ABS systems themselves. The car has more powerful calibrated ABS systems because it has seat belts and a stable steering wheel to lean on. On motorcycles the manufacturers reduce the braking capacity so that the unskilled rider does not fly forward due to emergency brakes. In motorcycles the manufacturers spoil the braking capacity of the ABS (Compared to cars), then say we have added a safety ABS system. Some motorcycles are less safe and then ABS improves their safety. On a motorcycle like the CBR250R the ABC system is more harmful than beneficial. Doesn't really make sense, but that's the way it is.
 

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Front/rear split of braking-power depends upon actual deceleration-G you need. For light-braking, such as coming up to stop-light, you can use 50/50 easily. As braking-power increases for faster deceleration, more and more weight is transferred to front-tyre. This increases front-traction and reduces rear. At maximum-braking, 100% of braking-force comes from front-tyre.



On autos with single pedal for front & rear brakes, there is proportioning-valve that varies F/R split with 50/50 initially for light braking-pressure. As you push pedal harder, it increases pressure to front and reduces to rear. However, due to longer wheelbase and lower C.o.G, autos will never have extreme of 100% weight-transfer to front tyre like on bikes.

Here's comparison of simultaneous application of pressure to both front & rear brake, as pressure-increases, rear-tyre would lock up first as weight transfers to front. So you want to reduce pressure to rear-brake as braking-force increases.



Using various different proportioning-valves gives different split-ratios. This is matched to the surface-area differences between front & rear calipers.



I suppose this is how Honda is doing it using electronics and software instead of mechanical valves.
 

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ABS on autos also reduce ultimate braking-performance. Racers will pretty much always disable and remove ABS when converting street-car into race-car.

On both street autos and bikes, ABS is more of safety feature than performance. Imaging going around corner in rain and finding elephant in road. Instinctively, you're gonna grab lots of brakes and try to steer around elephant. Most people, 99.9% of them, will not be able to bring their bikes up 100% of traction-limit with combined braking and steering simultaneously! Most will panic and over-brake, then as soon as you turn steering, tyre will slide and you'll crash right into that elephant! With ABS, it'll adjust braking forces so that you have leftover traction to steer at same time in rain. Simply amazing!
 

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ABS on autos also reduce ultimate braking-performance.
YES. And in motorcycles compared to cars, there is a more significant reduction (so that the rider does not fly over the handlebars)
ABS is more of safety feature than performance.
NO. ABS in CBR250R It is a feature to Improve sales performance(As if the manufacturer cares about our safety)
If there is a decrease in braking capacity there is a decrease in safety. In the case of emergency ABS installed in motorcycles makes no positive difference, and in my opinion does more harm than good.
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Sorry. You explain the theory very very well(y)(y)(y), and I'm talking about what's going on in the field. In the field many of the riders who come to ride after they have a license for a car, under pressure their instinct is to press on the motorcycle foot pedal(rear brake), instead of jumping with their hand on the front brake.

The opposite instinct, hand and not foot, is not taught in motorcycle riding lessons.
In riding lessons teach to ride slowly and that's the safest way to ride.

In our CBR the rear brake has almost no significance, and ABS that lowers braking performance impairs in safety and does not add safety.

Emergency braking while riding a curve requires much more experience even with so-called: Counter Steering, because the brake power causes the handlebars to straighten forward.

A rider who wants to add safety to his riding needs to slow down, this is the only thing under the rider's control, and this is the only thing that has been proven to be effective in preventing accidents: speeding is killing !!! This is seen in all studies!
There is no study that has shown that ABS prevents accidents on motorcycles, because statistically it does not prevent!
 

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I have seen too many people grabbing a handful of front brake and eating asphalt as I could 100% agree with the above. I'm glad my bike has ABS. But to each their own.
 

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YES. And in motorcycles compared to cars, there is a more significant reduction (so that the rider does not fly over the handlebars)
You have not tested this have you? You'll find that front-tyre locks up and slides well before you fly over handlebars. This is not a bicycle! C.o.G. of bike+rider system is much, much lower between longer wheelbase than on bicycle. That's why so many people crash unnecessarily because of using rear-brake only fearing endos. Many accident investigations slows long, long skid-mark from rear tyre that ends in collision. That could've been avoided if rider used more front-brake or only front-brake. The rear brake-pads on my 1986 VF500 are same ones that left show-room floor; not even 1/2 worn.

NO. ABS in CBR250R It is a feature to Improve sales performance(As if the manufacturer cares about our safety)
If there is a decrease in braking capacity there is a decrease in safety. In the case of emergency ABS installed in motorcycles makes no positive difference, and in my opinion does more harm than good.
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No, it's user-skill. Most people who crashed, never even come close to 100% braking-capacity of their bike. Even if ABS reduces braking-deceleration by 5%, riders using only 50-60% of bike's capacity will never notice difference and crash anyway..


Sorry. You explain the theory very very well(y)(y)(y), and I'm talking about what's going on in the field. In the field many of the riders who come to ride after they have a license for a car, under pressure their instinct is to press on the motorcycle foot pedal(rear brake), instead of jumping with their hand on the front brake.

The opposite instinct, hand and not foot, is not taught in motorcycle riding lessons.
In riding lessons teach to ride slowly and that's the safest way to ride.

In our CBR the rear brake has almost no significance, and ABS that lowers braking performance impairs in safety and does not add safety.

Emergency braking while riding a curve requires much more experience even with so-called: Counter Steering, because the brake power causes the handlebars to straighten forward.

A rider who wants to add safety to his riding needs to slow down, this is the only thing under the rider's control, and this is the only thing that has been proven to be effective in preventing accidents: speeding is killing !!! This is seen in all studies!
Speed has nothing to do with safety, it's all rider skill level. Unskilled riders who don't know how to use their brakes effectively are dangerous at any speed. I would not trust these riders at 1/2 speed-limit. Rossi at 200mph is perfectly safe.

There is no study that has shown that ABS prevents accidents on motorcycles, because statistically it does not prevent!
I guess you haven't looked:

 

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many people crash unnecessarily because of using rear-brake only
YES, that's exactly my argument, and I see that we agree on this.
it's user-skill.
NO. The average rider should not be at the level of a professional rider, I am an average rider, most of us are. None of us are going to spend hours riding a day on a track, just to improve technique and instincts that are especially good for the race track. There are dangers on the public road that are not on a sterile racetrack, and all the beautiful techniques that are appropriate for a racetrack will not save you from an accident due to the hazards of the public road. And I have known such professional rider "geniuses" who in the name of their high skill in riding are not with us today.
So what does an average rider need to add safety:
1. Ride slowly so that it has time to react to any surprise on the road.
2. Be aware of the dangers typical of riders, and especially be aware of the speed issue.
people who crashed, never even come close to 100% braking-capacity
YES, and again we agree. Because the instinct of most of us, an instinct that is taken from many hours of driving in a car, this instinct sends us to press with the foot on the foot pedal (instead of jumping with the hand on the front brake). The rear brake does not produce more than 20% braking force, and then one of two options happens:
1. Start slipping, and lose control.
2. Do not slip because ABS but also can not stop, because only 20% is not enough!!!
The trick is to avoid extreme situations, and the right way to do so is to ride slowly.
riders using only 50-60% of bike's capacity
YES. Because emergency braking mainly activates the rear brake, which provides no more than 20% effective braking force, and sometimes added to it a certain amount of power from the front brake, and this force is not enough to produce enough braking force to avoid the accident.
Speed has nothing to do with safety,
NO. Speed is the only tested thing that takes care of your safety.
And this is 16 times true for two-wheeled riders(Vs CAR), riders who are not protected in a tin box, do not have seat belts, and do not have airbags. This is how all research shows, and your right to conduct yourself in a world where your rules come is detached from the statistics of most of us.
I guess you haven't looked:
You are intelligent enough to understand that the studies presented by insurance companies and car manufacturers have come to serve the economic interests of those companies, and have nothing to do with reality. In studies I have known, over the years, and with the increase in the number of motorcycles, and despite the addition of "safety" systems for motorcycles, the number of riders that killed in road accidents has only increased.
According to studies I know, the number of motorcyclists injured in fatal accidents is 16 times greater than the number of casualties in accidents involving cars, a figure that takes into account the amount of vehicles in relation to accidents.
You're smart enough to understand that the only thing that provides significant safety It is not riding on motorcycle at all, yes?!!!! And the whole story of motorcycle safety systems as an item that adds safety is one big nonsense.
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https://www.iihs.org/api/datastoredocument/bibliography/2042
Using fake research is one of the most common ways of persuasion. The reason: Most of the time it will not be considered as a criminal act. A police investigator must know how to think like a criminal, so must scientists from the academics, they must think how to spot fake academic research. When a criminal cops are very rare, a scientists researchers who "fake" studies are very common.

It's not that researchers are criminals, it's the method that stumbles them. The researchers are given a task to prove something, often they also got a budgets for their research , and the giver of the money expects a certain result. It's also like letting a cat keep the cream.

The research you bring here lacks many details so that it can be said to be valid. It lacks too many details for us to say it is reliable and valid research. One of the fundamental flaws in the study you presented is that it does not reveal the raw data, and does not provide relevant details about the population being examined:
  • Men vs. women (men more involved in accidents)
  • Young vs. older (young tend to have more accidents)
  • Those with riding experience vs. those without riding experience who are most involved in accidents.
  • And the amount of motorcycle types in each of the test groups, costumes and adventures most involved in accidents.
  • Dangerous roads vs. safe roads
  • Wet road vs. dry road
  • etc.
for example:
If the group of "riders with no ABS system", consists of: Young men, with no riding experience, riding on costumes, dangerous and wet road, then it is clear that the results of that group will be "More Accidents", it is NOT related to "NO ABS".
It is no coincidence that the details are missing in the report that purports to be objective research, it is "invited" research, and that is how it should be treated (Not valid).
The other two links you brought up are marketing articles, which I understand rely on the "invited" research (False research / Not valid).

The facts are very simple, in recent years motorcycles are equipped with a variety of "safety" systems and the number of casualties per 10,000 riders has only grown. Conclusion: These are not a safety systems.
 

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The facts are very simple, in recent years motorcycles are equipped with a variety of "safety" systems and the number of casualties per 10,000 riders has only grown. Conclusion: These are not a safety systems.
Not in Germany. The number of accidents is actually going down even though there are more and more vehicles on the roads.
Motorräder - Verunglückte und Getötete bei Unfällen in Deutschland | Statista

Funny considering that a lot of bikes have become stupidly powerful over the last 10 years.
 

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Not in Germany. The number of accidents is actually going down even though there are more and more vehicles on the roads.
Motorräder - Verunglückte und Getötete bei Unfällen in Deutschland | Statista

Funny considering that a lot of bikes have become stupidly powerful over the last 10 years.
Funny who thinks that data in Germany are only affected by his ABS in his CBR250R, ABS that only increases risk and does not reduce risk, and ignores the other factors that actually characterize Germans. So being a rider in Germany in the year 2020 is less dangerous, not because of ABS, sure because of the corona virus (there were movement restrictions to prevent infection), And other factors I mentioned above (age, experience, type of motorcycle, road quality, etc.). Funny that some people think it's because of ABS.
You're smart enough to know you sent us a graph from 2020 and not from the last decade, yes ?!
Funny that there are people for whom a year feels like ten years.

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