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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
At 5500 miles, I'm thinking about new tires. I think the IRC Road Winner RX-01's have been superb, but I don't want to overlook other tires that might be as good or better.

I'm under the impression that the CBR250R should be fitted only with bias ply tires. This relatively new video from Michelin promoting their Pilot Street Radial shows a CBR250R scooting around a race track on their new radials. At one point they even do a text-over listing the tires sizes as 140/70-17 and 110/70-17.

Thoughts? It seems like Michelin is implying that the Pilot Street Radial is suitable for our bikes, however their website Tire Selector only offers up their Pilot Activ bias ply as fitment for this motorcycle.

 

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The video definitely shows a CBR250R at 1:15. You may also consider the Pirelli Diablo Rosso 2 Tires as well, as they seem to be in the correct sizes for our bike.
 

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Those new Michelin Pilot Street Radials have yet to be released in the U.S... not sure if they are are available in Europe yet either... Michelin Corporate did a Press/Media kit back in March of this year for these and a few other new motorcycle tires.
 

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I seem to be able to order them in the Netherlands in 140/70-17... so they appear to be available but since they are cheaper (80Euro rear) than the Pilot Road 2 en 3 (120 Euro rear but 150/70-17) are they really better?
Richard
 

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I've just fitted a Michelin Pilot active and I'm very happy with the handling/performance. Can't comment on tyre life yet but I only got 4600 miles out of the IRC so I am hoping for better.

I'm not convinced about the benefits of radial construction, especially for a low powered lightweight bike,and it would be interesting to compare the weight of the 2 alternatives.

Regards Roadster
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I tend to agree with the radial skeptics. If I had money to burn, I would try a set of radials but since I don't...I will stick with bias ply.

MotoMike: I was looking at a couple of your excellent links (from another thread) to some great prices on IRC OEM tires last night. Guess what? Overnight the rear went up $11 and the front went up $5. :(
 

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In addition to the Pilot Street Radial, the Michelin press release also listed a Bias Ply S speed rated version called the Pilot Street, which besides the CBR250R sizes showed a range of different sizes for other small motorcycles & scooters.

The Pilot Street Radial tire is H speed rated, and the press release only lists one front size 110/70-17 M/C 54H, and two rear sizes 130/70-17 M/C 62H, and 140/70-17 M/C 66H which seems to make this tire aimed directly at the CBR250R & Ninja 250/300 markets.

Both the Radial and Bias Ply versions of the tire share the same tread pattern.
 

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I tend to agree with the radial skeptics. If I had money to burn, I would try a set of radials but since I don't...I will stick with bias ply.

MotoMike: I was looking at a couple of your excellent links (from another thread) to some great prices on IRC OEM tires last night. Guess what? Overnight the rear went up $11 and the front went up $5. :(
It does look like the IRC's went up in price a bit...
Front: Road Winner RX-01 Tire - Front - 110/70-17 $47.44

Rear: Honda Motorcycle Parts 2011 CBR250R AC REAR WHEEL Diagram (Ref# 12)

It seems that Partzilla sources their tires from multiple distributers, and so in some cases they will list two different prices for the same exact tire. For the IRC rear, ordering it under the OEM Honda part number is a little cheaper than under their aftermarket P/N's. Go figure...

Last year at this time I had noticed how incredibly inexpensive OEM Honda parts were for this bike, and so I stocked up on a few spares, including a few fairing pieces. Now a year later many of the OEM parts have more than doubled in price from last year. I paid $30 each for the main side fairings ('12 Tri-Color) last year, now they are about $65 each. Still, compared to OEM parts for other motorcycles including other Honda M/C models built in Japan, CBR250R parts are very inexpensive. Maybe Honda just woke up one morning are realized that CBR250R parts were priced too low and that they were giving away the farm.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It seems that Partzilla sources their tires from multiple distributers, and so in some cases they will list two different prices for the same exact tire. For the IRC rear, ordering it under the OEM Honda part number is a little cheaper than under their aftermarket P/N's. Go figure...
I noticed that. It's got to be a challenge keeping multiple yet identical SKU's price-aligned.

Last year at this time I had noticed how incredibly inexpensive OEM Honda parts were for this bike, and so I stocked up on a few spares, including a few fairing pieces. Now a year later many of the OEM parts have more than doubled in price from last year. I paid $30 each for the main side fairings ('12 Tri-Color) last year, now they are about $65 each. Still, compared to OEM parts for other motorcycles including other Honda M/C models built in Japan, CBR250R parts are very inexpensive. Maybe Honda just woke up one morning are realized that CBR250R parts were priced too low and that they were giving away the farm.
Wow that was & still is pretty cheap. I didn't really look into OEM parts too much until my bike fell over on its right side while parked. I was on a 1500-mile tour and had it loaded up with gear. I foolishly let the rear tire settle into a slight depression in the asphalt, causing the bike to stand up straighter than it normally would. I hopped off, and then watched helplessly as it fell over in slow motion.

Thankfully not too much damage; I only needed an exhaust shield, mirror, bar end, and brake lever. Truth be told I could have gotten by with not replacing the mirror and brake lever but they are so cheap, I figured "Why not?" I think the whole lot delivered was less than $90.
 

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I think these snips come from the same press release you found.
Yeah, those are from the same press release. For some reason I wasn't able to link the press release here in its pdf form.

UPDATE: I just got off the phone with a customer service rep at Michelin USA, and was told that the new Pilot Street Radial, as well as the new Pilot Street (Bias Ply) tires are currently in production, and are scheduled to begin shipping from Michelin warehouses in the US to aftermarket distributers in two months time. He didn't have any retail pricing info at this time. The Michelin rep I spoke to said that he would contact me with any further updates on these tires, and so I'll pass any new info along in this thread.

These are the Michelin Part Numbers:

Pilot Street Radial
110/70-17 M/C 54H (Front) ........... P/N 23127

140/70-17 M/C 66H (Rear) ............ P/N 29590

Pilot Street (Bias Ply)
110/70-17 M/C 54S (Front) ........... P/N 29360

140/70-17 M/C 66S (Rear) ............ P/N 29363
 

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Discussion Starter #13
UPDATE: I just got off the phone with a customer service rep at Michelin USA, and was told that the new Pilot Street Radial...tires are currently in production, and are scheduled to begin shipping from Michelin warehouses in the US to aftermarket distributors in two months time.
Way to go, calling the factory!

Despite what I said previously about being unsure that radials are suitable for the CBR250R...I'm really intrigued by the amount of R&D that Michelin has put into these tires. The promise of good wet and dry traction combined with long tread life and superb handling is extremely tantalizing.
 

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The USA Honda website lists the CBR250R as having (RADIAL) tires on the specification page..I have always wondered then,why mine came with bias ply tires..and just about every tire out there in our size is bias ply? A radial will last SO many more miles than a bias ply will.


http://powersports.honda.com/documentum/model_pages/specification_pdf_files/2012_CBR250R_Specs.pdf
From what I've seen, all of the Thai built 250's came from the factory with IRC bias ply's... as for the spec page on the website, it was probably a mis-communication between marketing and production. I've looked at IRC's corporate website and they don't list any radial version of the Road Winners.

Still, one would think that American Honda would have had the tire spec typo corrected by now.

As far as these new Michelin's, it will be interesting to see how they price them ie. radial vs. bias ply. I'd expect the Pilot Street bias ply version to be competitively priced with the IRC Road Winners, and the Pilot Street Radial to be priced at least somewhat lower than the Pilot Road 2 radial.
 

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Hi guys,

Advantage and disadvantage of 150x60 vs. 140x70 on CBR250r? Thanks.
The CBR250's rear wheel width falls short for proper fitting of a 150 tire. A lot of people have put 150's on these bikes, some mainly to have the appearance of a wider rear tire, but it doesn't really accomplish this as the width of the wheel determines the distance between the tire beads and therefore the width between the sidewalls. One way to describe this is that the profile of a 150 tire tread would end up looking like the top third of this zero 0, where as the 140 tread would look like the top half of this O when both tires are mounted on the same width wheel. As a result, when the bike is leaned over the 150 tire should have a slightly larger, flatter contact patch than the 140.

Others may have a differing opinion, but I don't see any real advantage to putting a 150 rear tire on this bike, particularly for everyday public road use.
 

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The CBR250's rear wheel width falls short for proper fitting of a 150 tire. A lot of people have put 150's on these bikes, some mainly to have the appearance of a wider rear tire, but it doesn't really accomplish this as the width of the wheel determines the distance between the tire beads and therefore the width between the sidewalls. One way to describe this is that the profile of a 150 tire tread would end up looking like the top third of this zero 0, where as the 140 tread would look like the top half of this O when both tires are mounted on the same width wheel. As a result, when the bike is leaned over the 150 tire should have a slightly larger, flatter contact patch than the 140.

Others may have a differing opinion, but I don't see any real advantage to putting a 150 rear tire on this bike, particularly for everyday public road use.
Thanks for the inputs. Yeah I guess the only advantage of a 150 rear tire for CBR250r is for the looks only. Also the availability of a 140/70 tire on some good model tires, most tires only offer a 150/60 for rear. But, I know we have plenty of option like Pirelli Sport Demon, Diablo Rosso 2, Avon Road Rider, Bridgestone BT003 etc.

Here's my 150x60 BT090. Planning to replace it with Avon Road Rider but my top pick would be Rosso 2 of course.



Got a 1mm chick strip. I guess I can no longer use that tire edge.

 

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Thanks for the inputs. Yeah I guess the only advantage of a 150 rear tire for CBR250r is for the looks only. Also the availability of a 140/70 tire on some good model tires, most tires only offer a 150/60 for rear. But, I know we have plenty of option like Pirelli Sport Demon, Diablo Rosso 2, Avon Road Rider, Bridgestone BT003 etc.

Here's my 150x60 BT090. Planning to replace it with Avon Road Rider but my top pick would be Rosso 2 of course.



Got a 1mm chick strip. I guess I can no longer use that tire edge.

That's the biggest millimetre I've ever seen. :D
 

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I ran my first rear tire for 12,000 miles...of course you could almost see air thru it, and have done 17,000 on the front...will be replaced by around 20,000 miles if not sooner. What kind of mileage could I expect from a radial? Understand, guys and girls, I maybe here for a different reason than some. Sure, I enjoy weekend rides, but my 250 saves me 10 bucks a day commuting. Right now, I've GOTTA have that savings...
 
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