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Discussion Starter #162
I don't know if forum member Parakalien is still active, but it looks like a review was posted at Revzilla shortly after the tires were purchased.
 

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Discussion Starter #163 (Edited)
At 15,000 miles / 24,000 km, this past week I put my bike into the Honda shop for the 16,000 mile / 26,000 km schedule service. I just want to get it out of the way before the riding season gets into full swing. We had a sudden spring thaw here and I guess it caught a lot of riders off guard because usually the shop would be overwhelmed at this time of year, however they will complete the work in about three business days.

The shop manager pointed out that my front tire was rather substantially scalloped (cupped). I had noticed the wear pattern where some portions of the tread were raised about 3/16" (5 mm) above the areas on the other side of the grooves, , but I didn't really grasp the implications regarding tire wear.

I apologize that I do not have a photo of the worn tire, but the raised area is circled in this photo of the tire when it was new:



I need to educate myself more about front tire wear patterns; I don't really understand the mechanism behind this phenomenon.

I have been running a set of Bridgestone BT45 Battlax tires for the last 9,000 miles / 14,500 km (put on at 6,000 mi / 10,000 km).

It's hard to comment on the wear characteristics of the rear because I picked up a screw in it after only about 3,000 miles / 5,000 km last June and replaced it with a new one. However based on the first example with 3,000 miles and the second example with 6,000 miles, I would say that the center wears rather noticeably. Here is a photo of the 3,000 mile tire next to its replacement:



Long story short, I decided to have the shop order in the Pilot Street Radials and give them a try. I think the cost for the tires will be around USD $265, which is maybe $50 more than I would pay ordering online and dropping them off. However I do not mind sending a few dollars towards the local dealer now and then because I appreciate having them in business nearby.

My prediction on the handling? When I went from the OEM IRC Road Winners to the BT45s, I felt that the BT45s were slightly more ponderous and heavy-feeling, less eager to tip in. However they were more stable and planted in the curves. I attribute this to improved front tire grip compared to the IRC. If the Street Radials provide even more grip than the BT45s, then the bike may feel even a little less eager to tip in and even more secure in the curves. Time will tell - I will report my impressions here in due time.
 

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I would like to hear from owners of the Michelin Pilot Street Radials regarding handling characteristics and wet traction.
I have them on my CRF250M and I like them. More confidence inspiring than the IRCs and better handling mainly because I went with a 140 rear.
It's not raining much here but the few times I rode in the wet they did fine, didn't skid under hard braking but I wouldn't know how they'd handle in turns in real wet conditions.
I'm surprised how well they last, after 13,000 km they look as if they're about half gone! But I'm not riding like a madman.
 

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As some of you might have read already in the "What did you do to your CBR 250 today" thread I picked mine up from the shop yesterday were it waited for three weeks to finally get it's new tires.
After riding it for about 75 -80 miles I took a break and had a closer look at them. At that point I got shocked to see that the labels on my rear tire read "Michelin Pilot Street Radial" while the front tire only reads "Michelin Pilot Street"... So before I go back to the shop tomorrow and set it on fire for mounting two different types of tires on my bike, which is illegal here and nullifies the "vehicle type approval" (or whatever it's called in English), which in turn of course also cancels out any protection from the insurance company, I would like to verify whether the front tires of the radials also have a "radial" in their label and that my tire is in fact the bias ply version (I also should set myself on fire with the shop for not checking immediately as the operator of a vehicle is responsible for it's street worthiness:mad:. Lesson learned....:().
 

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Discussion Starter #166
...I would like to verify whether the front tires of the radials also have a "radial" in their label...
Wow, that is very surprising! I watched the guy at my shop open the catalog to place the order. The bias ply and the radials were on different pages in the book, so it would be hard to accidentally mix the order.

Here is a photo of my front tire. Indeed it says "Radial" on it.



The shop guy reminded me to ride easy for 100 miles or so until the mold release compound is scrubbed off. I knew that but I appreciated the reminder anyway...it shows concern for the customers.
 

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Discussion Starter #168
Also it seems your country has too many strict rules on bikes. Glad I live in the US. lol
Germany takes driving and riding a LOT more seriously than the US. They do make it hard to modify vehicles but on the other hand they allow unlimited speed on certain sections of the Autobahn.

If you ever drive or ride in Germany you will notice that people physically operate their vehicles in an aggressive manner. They accelerate hard and have no problem standing on the brakes in an instant or suddenly banging a hard turn at speed. Trust me, in that environment you want to be driving or riding a vehicle in top mechanical condition so that you can react instantly to the instant actions of other drivers.
 

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Wow, that is very surprising! I watched the guy at my shop open the catalog to place the order.
Thanks for the picture. It's appreciated.
You'll be hard pressed to find anyone here who still uses a paper catalog. He ordered the stuff in a computer system. I'm also not yet sure whether he screwed up ordering or Michelin screwed up delivering. But the shop definitely screwed up accepting two different tires and mounting them on one bike.

The shop guy reminded me to ride easy for 100 miles or so until the mold release compound is scrubbed off. I knew that but I appreciated the reminder anyway...it shows concern for the customers.
Yes, they told me that too.

@Arrethul
Yep, we're completely over regulated when it comes to bikes (I even have to carry "certificate of non objection" by any tire manufacturer who's tires I put on my bike to document that they think it's ok with my bike...<insert smiley that slams it's head against a brick wall here>).
On the other hand we have other advantages like no speed limit and well trained law enforcement officers. That alone makes me happy to not be in the US.;)
 

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Discussion Starter #170
Thanks for the picture. It's appreciated.
Sure thing.

You'll be hard pressed to find anyone here who still uses a paper catalog. He ordered the stuff in a computer system.
He ordered it in the computer but he identified and validated the correct product and part number with the paper catalog. I think he has learned not to trust someone else to do proper data entry into a computer system.
 

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He ordered it in the computer but he identified and validated the correct product and part number with the paper catalog. I think he has learned not to trust someone else to do proper data entry into a computer system.
Would probably have been a wiser choice here as well.:rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #172
Pics

First impressions to follow.

Front Tire:





Rear Tire (wow, the rusty OEM muffler looks like hell):


 

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Discussion Starter #174
Riding Impressions After 50 Miles

It got cold here again after a brief warm-up, so I only went out in the 45° F / 7° C air for an hour and a half in my heated gear to try out the new Michelin Pilot Street Radials.

Previous Tires: Bridgestone Battlax BT45 bias ply

Front Tire Pressure: 29 PSI
Rear Tire Pressure: 31 PSI

Type of riding: meandering country roads at 45-65 mph. Typical landscape:



Obviously, comparisons and impressions like this are highly personal and subjective. Also, remember I am comparing new tires to old tires. With those disclaimers in place, here are some things that I noted about these radials.

  • Exceptionally quiet. Silent actually. I was really amazed at how much more I could hear the mechanical sound of the engine. I had not realized how much noise the IRC and Bridgestone tires were making.
  • Improved ride quality. The tires seems to absorb and conform to road imperfections rather than reacting and transmitting them to the suspension. It's easy to perceive the influence of Michelin's touring tire experience in the engineering of these small bike radials. The reduction in high-frequency road vibration had the odd effect of increasing the perceived vibration coming from the engine. Not a bad thing, just something I noticed.
  • Nimbleness. The BT45s always felt a bit ponderous and reluctant to turn in, requiring heavier input on the bars. These radials however are highly responsive...almost but not quite becoming twitchy. They still track true and straight but respond very quickly to rider steering input. I was rapidly slaloming on an empty highway at 45 mph and I am sure I was cutting back and forth in much tighter radii than I could with the old tires.
  • Stability over rough pavement. We have some rough areas of pavement around here, due to slippage of the underlying soil causing road displacement. Typically the bias ply tires would skip and skitter around over these areas, however these radials stay more firmly planted. In some cases I did feel a slight wiggle side-to-side with these radials but it felt very different than the rapid chattering of the bias ply tires.
  • Rolling resistance. I got the feeling that the rolling resistance is lower, because the bike took much longer to lose speed when letting off the throttle. I am really hoping to see a noticeable improvement in fuel economy from my current 69 mpg.
 

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Rolling resistance. I got the feeling that the rolling resistance is lower, because the bike took much longer to lose speed when letting off the throttle. I am really hoping to see a noticeable improvement in fuel economy from my current 69 mpg.
The funny thing is I could swear that my bike got more speed on the new tires (even though the front was the bias ply version). Maybe it's just circumstances but I commuted the same Autobahn for some time in the past that I used for my ride on Saturday and achieved speeds I had not seen before in all of my commuting (an indicated 145km/h is still pretty slow compared to some other speeds I've seen here but I don't tuck and weigh 85kg so I think it's just my riding style). I attributed that to possible tail winds... We'll see in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter #176
150 mile update

OK, I have put down another 100 miles on the tires.

More impressions:

Handling. They take a little getting used to. The handling is not bad, not wrong...just different. I need to re-train myself not to push on the bars so hard, which was necessary with the BT45s. I have a slightly uneasy feeling right now because I am leaning too much and cutting inside the curves too much. Because I am aware of the situation, I find myself slowing down more, dropping an extra gear, and cranking the throttle wide open to gain back speed coming out of the corners. This has caused my fuel consumption to increase from 69 mpg to 62 mpg. My normal riding mode is fast but smooth and energy-conserving, with minimal braking and usually only one gear down on entry. At the moment I am slower, less smooth, and not efficient. This is entirely a matter of rider adjustment and no criticism of the tires.

I don't want to overstate the handling differences. It's subtle. But if you are like me, your bike is an extension of your body and you are keenly aware of any change in its behavior. These tires are truly "the perfect match" for this bike. I can feel their responsiveness and the way they work with the suspension, not against it.

I can't wait to put on some more miles and see if I can re-train myself to ride these tires to their full potential!
 

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Hope I don't have to wait for another three weeks to get my front tire.
In case that, don't worry about a bias ply (S) front and a radial (H) rear.
As long it is this way, means the front is the 'weaker' spec, it's road legal.
Is your tire shop taking it back? What's written on the bill, how much they charged you for the street? I guess, no one even checked on the S and H speedrating, there!
 

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Need new rubber asap. Has anyone tracked these tires? I need something for primarily commuting/canyon runs, but I'm trying to get to a coaching day at the track every few months. Wondering if these tires will fit the profile.
 

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In case that, don't worry about a bias ply (S) front and a radial (H) rear.
As long it is this way, means the front is the 'weaker' spec, it's road legal.
Is your tire shop taking it back? What's written on the bill, how much they charged you for the street? I guess, no one even checked on the S and H speedrating, there!
The problem is that it's illegal in Germany. No mixed tires! In case of an accident with injuries or fatalities the vehicles get confiscated for a technical inspection. If they find out then that the bike was illegally on the street the insurance won't pay a dime and it's also a felony on it's own. It's complete BS as both tires are legal for the bike, just not when mixed. Welcome to Germany, home of plenty of pointless laws.:D

My shop took the tire back and mounted the radial one for no charge so I didn't have to pay anything extra and actually got the radial for the price of the bias ply.
 

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Need new rubber asap. Has anyone tracked these tires? I need something for primarily commuting/canyon runs, but I'm trying to get to a coaching day at the track every few months. Wondering if these tires will fit the profile.
They are long runners, with extrem good wet handling. So i assume, that the grip on the edge will be a bit tricky, on a track.
For 'also' track days, I would look into Pilot Roads 2, 2 compound, front and rear, bigger section of soft, than the Rosso 2's, and still a lot km/miles for commuting.
Only thing: not 140, but 150/70, rear.
Front comes in 110/70

I was thinking about that option, for quiet a while. But I'm really not planning track days, here.
And the 150/70 will correct your Speedo by some %, clother to the Speed, you driving :cool:
 
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