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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, so, I've been riding for two days, today will be my third. I've never driven a stick and this is the first motorcycle I've ever ridden, so you'll have to excuse the noobness of this question. Leaving my neighborhood there's a steep uphill climb with a stop sign at the top. How exactly do I handle this? I've been just rolling through or moving to the side of the road for the impending stall, but I'd like to actually be able to do this the right way. Thanks for any help!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Stop and hold the rear brake so you do not roll back. Give it throttle and slowly release the clutch. And your off....
I can get that to work sometimes, I've also been working on just feathering off the clutch to keep from rolling back and releasing more clutch to get going again. I'm generally about 50/50 on em. Guess it'll probably just take alot of practice.
 

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Stop and hold the rear brake so you do not roll back. Give it throttle and slowly release the clutch. And your off....[/QUOT I agree this is the best way to do it, I wouldnt sit there and slip the clutch. A little pratice and its no big deal.
 

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What Moto said.. but urgently and stop riding until you do.

STOP signs are for a reason.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The whole rolling through thing is what everyone does at this stop sign because there's a second stop sign 10ft from it, I'm basically using it to figure out what to do if I come to a similar setup where I actually do have to stop. I'm registered for the course and will take it soon, I'm just using my neighborhood to get a feel for the bike and was just looking for some tips on how to better handle this particular situation.
 

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every clutch is going to be a little different so it'll still take getting used to your specific bike regardless of taking the msf class. use the rear brake to help you until you're more familiar with where your clutch catches. there isn't a quick fix, all it takes is time and getting familiar with your bike
 

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im a noob as well... have my 1st 300 miles under my belt so far... the MSF class is great! I've seen even real experienced cats who have walked away with valuable and practical lessons learned.

I can honestly say that I'm even a better automotive driver as well as a result. This plus practice, and I fell that's steps in the right direction. I'm trying to grow with the sport by mastering the bikes I progress through...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yea, like I said, I'm taking the course later this month (the 26th), I was just trying to practice getting a feel for the bike and what to do in certain situations.
 

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l learned to ride on a Nighthawk 250. Even after taking the safety course hills took getting used to. A nearby steep mountain road has a wide turnout; I got out there early one morning before there was any traffic and did nothing but go up, stop, turn around, and do it again and again for about a half hour. I was fine after that.
 

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Rev it

Don't be afraid to rev the engine really high. If you are stalling, you need to rev higher. It won't hurt anything to just sit in the parking lot and rev the engine to 6000 with the clutch in for 5 minutes. As they said above, the rear brake is good for hill holding. Then rev the engine to 5-6000 rpm and let the clutch out slowly until the engine starts to over power the rear brake and you move forward.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Don't be afraid to rev the engine really high. If you are stalling, you need to rev higher. It won't hurt anything to just sit in the parking lot and rev the engine to 6000 with the clutch in for 5 minutes. As they said above, the rear brake is good for hill holding. Then rev the engine to 5-6000 rpm and let the clutch out slowly until the engine starts to over power the rear brake and you move forward.
Thanks for this, I think that's my problem, I'm keeping the rpms in the 3-4500 range and it's just not working out. Tomorrow I'll try to do it this way and hopefully it'll work out better.
 

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Rev It is right.. Using your revs a bit more along with your rear brake a bit can help you through this..feather the clutch to where you almost dont have to break at all. motorcycle clutches are meant to be "slipped". But practice makes perfect. just keep at it. you will get it.. Good luck.. Ride safe..
 

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Moto Vito and others are correct... Motorcycle Safety Course is the best way to go. Then practice what you learn... from starting to stopping. I used to go to the college I took my course at and ride around on the course when they didn't have classes. Didn't have the cones available, but they're not there on the street anyway.
Once you get some more practice, you won't even think about it much anymore. In the meantime, the rear brake, clutch, gas advice is quite good. Practice on flat areas so you can get used to the clutch engagement point too.
 
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