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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a brand new owner of a 2011 cbr250. I know next to nothing about motorcycles. I am currently taking a class about how to ride and get my license on tuesday. So, so many questions. I kinda chose the cbr randomly because of mpgs and good for beginners. So what are the best things to upgrade in it? As I said I know next to nothing about bikes, can I put a radio speaker system in somehow? I like to listen to the radio. What kind of gas mileage will I expect? Also how do I ride it so it stays in good condition? How do I ride it so it gets good gas mileage?

I rode it for the first time today after purchasing it on thursday. It is scary lol. Until today, when I rode a motorcycle for the first time at the class I have never rode a motorcycle of any kind.
 

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Enjoy the new bike and read this forum. There's answers to your questions here. I'm a new rider, too. I've decided that most modifications can and should wait until I've logged more miles on the bike. In the meantime, I'm spending my money on safety--helmets, jackets, gloves, boots, and pants as well as taking the MSF safety course. After that, my first mods will be to make my lights brighter in hopes of being more visible.Only after I have done those things will I turn my mind and money toward performance modifications.

Good luck with the new bike. I think you will love it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That sounds like a good idea, brighter lights. I have no gear! My friend just gave me a helmet but I need all the rest of the stuff to go with it. Sounds like a shopping spree at the honda dealership, I get a 50% discount with the class I am taking. I really want to get one of those reflective jacket things...
 

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The CBR is good to go with imho nothing to add on the performance side to make it a blast. This is my 4th bike and my favorite by far.
 

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Be careful about the second-hand helmet. Make sure it's never been dropped from any significant height and that it's DOT or, better, SNELL rated. Otherwise, enjoy your shopping spree! And be sure to post some ride reports once you get all set. I gotta believe that there there are some awesome routes out there in Colorado. ;)
 

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Welcome aboard matey. The most important thing about a crash helmet is that it fits correctly. You need to try them on in a shop really, one manufacturers size can be different from anothers. Decent clothing will make your riding much more enjoyable in colder weather, and offer some protection if you are unfortunate enough to fall off.
 

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Hey dude, I have a similar story, I bought the tri-color a month ago and have logged 200 miles, noticing a vast improvement in my skills and ability to ride safely.
I ride in the inner city (Brooklyn, NY), I don't think its irrational to think I don't need the full-on war gear given that I'm riding at relatively low speeds in traffic with a gazillion red lights and stop signs XD I bought a helmet (be careful about sizing if your planning on buying online) and some cheap gloves. When I'm ready for the highway, I'll buy an armored jacket and maybe another helmet (Snell certified), and more protective gloves. Then again with that line of thought, I guess I could buy them now since I'm gonna have to buy em anyway.

I don't hear of many radios being installed in sports bikes, and I don't think you'd be able to hear it much with the wind blazing.

Invest your time and efforts into getting comfortable with the controls and learning all the nuances of motorcycle riding, and then think about mods IMO Plus, you might realize a year from now you want something heavier, like the CBR650 older brother.
 

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You don't need to crash at fast speeds to get road rash and other injuries.

Most crashes happen at slow speeds. City traffic can be much more dangerous than the interstate.

Invest in some gear.
 

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Welcome to the world of motorcycling mania, Coloradoman! Like you, I'm very new... got my MSF license 3/11, my new CBR was delivered 3/16 and as of yesterday I have 285 miles on her. Each time I ride, I learn. Each time I read and study, I learn. This will be a lifelong learning journey. With the knowledge and experience comes a shift from fear to fun. Don't get me wrong--the risks are clearly present, however I'm learning to perceive and proactively mitigate them. SEE: Search, Evaluate and Execute.

IMHO I don't think a radio is a good idea. Your attention needs to be 110% focused on the riding environment--road conditions, cagers, pedistrians, animals, control, speed, weather, preparedness, reaction time, etc. I love the silent dialogue in my mind as I drive defensively and strategically, making each decision and planning for the next. It's kind of like a game of chess.

Ditto to what the other guys said about gear--it will also help you 'feel' a bit safer. Managing some of that fear to keep you thinking clearly and focused on the task of driving defensively. One more thing--a guy on this forum recommended David Hough's book: "Proficient Motorcycling". Get it, read it and digest the information--it's excellent!

Stay safe, ride strong! Enjoy the journey and the miles of smiles to come soon!
 

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According to the MSF safety class I took, intersections (of which NY city has too many to count) are the most dangerous place for a rider.

I am in your boat Coloradoman, brand spanking new to this. No gear, no bike.
Good luck
 

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Welcome to the world of riding. I have logged 42K miles in the last 6 years on 2 bikes, Buell Blast and Triumph Daytona 675. Either can kill you if you aren't careful, one almost did me in last week :(

I would suggest for a new rider to stick to roads you know, avoid intersections where possible. I can remember when I started with my Buell, I wanted to ride with a group, they told me to call them back after I had 6 months in the saddle. Good advice, riding aggressively isn't for the beginning in week 1. I would many times take a path that might be 5 miles longer just to avoid traffic.

Pay attention, don't sightsee while riding. If you run off the road in a car, you can normally save it, on a bike, you probably are going down. I originally had speakers in my helmet and listened to an mp3 player when I rode, I didn't find it distracting at all, in fact I think it made me more aware of what was around me.

Get proper gear that fits and wear it. I would be in much better shape today if I had been wearing protective pants, but I was just wearing helmet, jacket, gloves, boots. I normally only wore my pants when I planned to ride aggressively, but I should have included "long trips". The jeans didn't save my knee, but it is healing. Be leery of hand-me-downs, Helmets are only good for one drop, but they also must fit correctly.

You can go into a shop to find the helmet you like, (dealerships are not where you want to really buy a helmet). Prices on-line are generally great, but you need to find somewhere they stock the helmet to get the right fit first.

Allot of people also are buying bikes because of gas prices, but bikes are not really cheap to operate. The 250 will be better than larger bikes. But tires don't last as long as on a car and are more expensive. Major services are more frequent too. On my Buell, I spent $2541 in repairs/service in 18K miles and another $842 in modifications. On my Triumph, I spent $3958 in repairs/service and $444 on modifications in 24K miles. Neither of these bikes had major issues or repairs due to crashes. Those are just normal wear items, tires, batteries, chains, sprockets, etc. The Buell had an exhaust issue, but that was completely covered under warranty and the Triumph had a rectifier that went bad and cost about $500.
 

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So, so many questions. I kinda chose the cbr randomly because of mpgs and good for beginners. So what are the best things to upgrade in it?
I would wait on upgrades. Set a specific time, maybe 1000miles and then begin to consider those types of things.

As I said I know next to nothing about bikes, can I put a radio speaker system in somehow? I like to listen to the radio.
Others may disagree with me but I believe that if you're listening to the radio, ipod, etc. you aren't paying 100% to the task at hand. Again, wait until you are a seasoned rider. And maybe not even then.

What kind of gas mileage will I expect?
My first tank refill I was getting 55mpg (US). It will get better as the bike breaks in and as I become a better rider. Perfect rider doing perfect riding in perfect conditions can get over 80mpg.

Also how do I ride it so it stays in good condition? How do I ride it so it gets good gas mileage?
Same as a car - you'll get better gas mileage if you're not in stop-and-go traffic. The peak performance seems to be doing 45mph in 6th gear.

And finally, get some good gear ASAP. If you're wearing the jacket, gloves, pants, etc. and have an accident in town you may survive with some bruises, etc. Don't wait until you're driving at high speed - crash then and you're just a greasy spot regardless of your clothes.
 

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OP...don't waste your money on upgrades that you aren't going to really use for the time being. In addition, there is a decent chance you will eventually outgrow a 250 and want to upgrade. If/when you do, those accessories aren't really worth anything when reselling. The best thing you can do as a new rider is buy gear, good gear. Your odds of going down as a new rider are pretty **** high, and they will only increase as you get more confident. My advice is go and buy the best gear you can afford you won't regret it, especially if you end up laying it down. Check out sportbiketrackgear.com, you can get a decent helmet, jacket, and gloves for the price of a slip-on exhaust.

To the poster who said they don't need gear living in a big city, that is the complete wrong line of thinking. Riding in traffic is much more dangerous. If you crash in the twisties.....it's your fault. In the city, cars are everywhere just waiting to do something stupid.
 

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don't need upgrades. If the bike isn't fast enough your not shifting right... put an Ipod bud in one ear only... ride a dirtbike for practice it will be a softer fall when you do lay down...

Do not underestimate how easy it is to fall.

I used to ride a Kawi KLR 650, dropped it so many times I can't count haha.

I just bought the CBR on the 17th of march. Put 450 miles on it and running!!! This is an awesome bike you made a great choice!
 
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