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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello! I've been lurking for a week or two and finally registered. My name's Dylan. :)

I don't have a bike, nor have I ever rode one. I'm just about to turn 18, and I'm going to wait about 6-9 months after I do before I get one (so that I can wait until I establish a good credit score).

I'm going to get a 2012 CBR 250R tri-color with ABS. Figure that since I'll be a completely new rider, I should go ahead and dish out the extra $500 for ABS.
I'm going to take the MSF course before I go ahead and buy it; california law to take it before you can get your license anyways.
 

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Hey Dylan,
I just joined the forum today myself, although I've been riding for over 40 years now. I'm sure you'll hear this from others as well... I'd recommend finding an inexpensive used bike as a first/starter bike. Something you could save up and pay cash for. A bike that when you drop it... and you will drop it... you won't feel too bad about the new scratches and dents on your old bike. IMO financing a bike is generally a bad idea, but is a really bad idea for a new, young rider who ultimately needs to get max seat time at min cost. I was about your age when I bought my first road legal bike, a Kawasaki F7 dual-purpose bike, but before that happened I had 10 years of off-road experience under my belt. An older street legal duel-sport, like a Honda XL/XR 125 or 250 would be an ideal bike to learn on, and have a lot of fun riding. These bikes can be had for as little as $800 to $1200 on Craigslist.

Trust me, what you want and need is motorcycle experience, not motorcycle payments, and big insurance payments to boot. There are better, safer ways to build your credit rating. Meanwhile you can save the money you're not spending now, towards the bike you'll want to buy when you are ready to move up. The shiny new bikes will always be there, the manufacturer's will make sure of that.

Regards,

Mike
 

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^

Gave great advice without being a total d bag.

Rare sighting for this forum.
 

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Hello! I've been lurking for a week or two and finally registered. My name's Dylan. :)

I don't have a bike, nor have I ever rode one. I'm just about to turn 18, and I'm going to wait about 6-9 months after I do before I get one (so that I can wait until I establish a good credit score).

I'm going to get a 2012 CBR 250R tri-color with ABS. Figure that since I'll be a completely new rider, I should go ahead and dish out the extra $500 for ABS.
I'm going to take the MSF course before I go ahead and buy it; california law to take it before you can get your license anyways.
Not 18 yet? 6-9 months is not adequate time to build any credit. More like 6-9 years. +$500 for abs won't make you a g** on wheels but it can't hurt if that's what you prefer. Take the motorcycle safety course and then take it again. You will need a good deal of experience before you get on the road. Does anyone in your network of family/friends ride?
 

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Hi Dylan. I just finished the MSF course with my 18 year old son. He passed with flying colors (so did I). My suggestion is that you hold off on ANY bike until you take the course. A super-nice young guy in the course only got through lunch because he just wasn't ready or safe. He was totally into the idea of getting his bike and riding with his buds, but even us beginners could tell that he was afraid to let the bike lean in the turns. My son had never ridden a motorcycle before and could barely drive a stick-shift car and he wound up loving it. I hope you do, too, but use the MSF course not only for training, but as a sort of "test drive" to see if motorcycles are for you. Good Luck!!
 

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I didn't pass the MSF course the first time around. I actually ended up dumping the bike on the quick stop (too much front brake, locked the wheel, hit some gravel, BAM) I wasn't hurt, but I was mad at myself and it was a SERIOUS learning experience. I really wanted to learn how to ride well, though, so I took the course again, and using my previous experience, I was able to pass with flying colors. The MSF course is a great way to gain experience and decide if riding is for you. Even if you don't pass the first time, or if you don't feel comfortable, riding is a SKILL, and takes lots and lots of practice.
 

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Greetings Prometheus199,

Welcome to the Forum. A+ on the MSF Course. After you complete the Course. Then you will Know if Venturing into the Two Wheel Revolution is what you Desire.
.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hey Dylan,
I'd recommend finding an inexpensive used bike as a first/starter bike. Something you could save up and pay cash for. A bike that when you drop it... and you will drop it... you won't feel too bad about the new scratches and dents on your old bike.

Trust me, what you want and need is motorcycle experience, not motorcycle payments, and big insurance payments to boot.
Thanks Mike. My only worry about buying a used bike is if the person treated it badly. It's going to be my main source of transportation (I have a honda accord right now), so. :$

Not 18 yet? 6-9 months is not adequate time to build any credit. More like 6-9 years. +$500 for abs won't make you a g** on wheels but it can't hurt if that's what you prefer. Take the motorcycle safety course and then take it again. You will need a good deal of experience before you get on the road. Does anyone in your network of family/friends ride?
I've known friends that've gotten up to a ~680 in 8 months or so. I'm not saying I'm going to have an excellent score that fast -- I'm just saying I'm going to get it up enough to get a loan. And the insurance rates aren't too bad for what I was quoted (with 0 years exp and no safety course) -- about $400/year for full coverage.

And yeah, I know I need the experience. :$
Nobody I know rides, but my brother's getting a bike soon aswell.

Hi Dylan. I just finished the MSF course with my 18 year old son. My suggestion is that you hold off on ANY bike until you take the course. I hope you do, too, but use the MSF course not only for training, but as a sort of "test drive" to see if motorcycles are for you. Good Luck!!
I was hoping you'd post; I've seen you almost everywhere on here. :D
But yeah, as I said, I'm not going to buy any bike until I've completed the MSF course. No reason to buy one and then find out it terrifies me.
 

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Thanks Mike. My only worry about buying a used bike is if the person treated it badly.
If you know someone that knows bikes to look with you, it isn't that hard to tell if a bike is abused. Just looking at the bike, records and owner tells you allot. Worse case, take the bike to a dealer for inspection.

I would also suggest a used/naked bike for anyone's first bike. My "first" bike after not riding for 20 years (I rode in the 70s-80s) was a Buell Blast. Low seat, naked bike. I dropped it in a slow turn the first month. Cost about $50 to replace the headlight trim and turn signal. A CBR with all the plastic could have caused allot more damage. Plastic isn't cheap.

The other good thing is you can get a used bike, ride it for a year and sell it for about the same price that paid for it.

Insurance will also be cheaper.
 

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I'm not sure if this has been mentioned. I do see mention of you needing a longer credit history. Motorcycles are considered a luxury item and is harder to finance than a home or a car, from my understanding. My credit score was 720+ when I went to buy my bike. Honda financial would only approve $4,700 of the $5,800 (exhaust added and extended 5 year warranty w/ road side service).

I'm in no way trying to discourage you. Just trying to share some of my knowledge. The guys have given some great advice. A used bike would be great if you've never ridden. My CBR is my first bike, but I've ridden motorcycles and ATV's as a kid. If you have your heart set on a new CBR250R and you're not approved or can't find a co-signer, save your cash little by little (including birthday money, christmas, etc.) and you'll have 4K to buy the bike in no time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If you know someone that knows bikes to look with you, it isn't that hard to tell if a bike is abused. Just looking at the bike, records and owner tells you allot. Worse case, take the bike to a dealer for inspection.

I would also suggest a used/naked bike for anyone's first bike. My "first" bike after not riding for 20 years (I rode in the 70s-80s) was a Buell Blast. Low seat, naked bike. I dropped it in a slow turn the first month. Cost about $50 to replace the headlight trim and turn signal. A CBR with all the plastic could have caused allot more damage. Plastic isn't cheap.

The other good thing is you can get a used bike, ride it for a year and sell it for about the same price that paid for it.

Insurance will also be cheaper.
Is a naked bike one with everything showing?
And I might just get used, while I save up enough $$ to either buy it outright or until I feel like I have enough experience.
But I was wanting to have the CBR for a year or two to gain experience, then buy a 600. :(
I'm not sure if this has been mentioned. I do see mention of you needing a longer credit history. Motorcycles are considered a luxury item and is harder to finance than a home or a car, from my understanding. My credit score was 720+ when I went to buy my bike. Honda financial would only approve $4,700 of the $5,800 (exhaust added and extended 5 year warranty w/ road side service).

I'm in no way trying to discourage you. Just trying to share some of my knowledge. The guys have given some great advice. A used bike would be great if you've never ridden. My CBR is my first bike, but I've ridden motorcycles and ATV's as a kid. If you have your heart set on a new CBR250R and you're not approved or can't find a co-signer, save your cash little by little (including birthday money, christmas, etc.) and you'll have 4K to buy the bike in no time.
720 and you still had problems...? Holy crap. :confused:
 

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My brand new CBR250r was the very first time I ever rode a motorcycle ever. I did not take the MSF course. Previous to the cbr I had a 178cc Chinese scooter and used that to obtain my motorcycle endorsement last spring. The scooter gave me some good road time experience. Previous to the scooter I had a moped when I was 15, back in 1990.

I was kind of nervous jumpin on a brand new cbr having never ridden a manual shift bike before. However, back in the late 90's I did own a manual transmission honda civic , that experience helped me tremendously.

All I did was study some youtube vids and apply the principles that I used when I used to drive a stick car . It took me all of 5 mins and I was off and cruising the streets. The 2011-12 CBR250r is the best bike you can get when you are a newbie. The bike steering feels super lite and shifting is easy. I guess you can say I'm self taught and possibly a natural. I feel like I can probably ride a 1000rr now and ready for the track. lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
My brand new CBR250r was the very first time I ever rode a motorcycle ever. I did not take the MSF course. Previous to the cbr I had a 178cc Chinese scooter and used that to obtain my motorcycle endorsement last spring. The scooter gave me some good road time experience. Previous to the scooter I had a moped when I was 15, back in 1990.

I was kind of nervous jumpin on a brand new cbr having never ridden a manual shift bike before. However, back in the late 90's I did own a manual transmission honda civic , that experience helped me tremendously.

All I did was study some youtube vids and apply the principles that I used when I used to drive a stick car . It took me all of 5 mins and I was off and cruising the streets. The 2011-12 CBR250r is the best bike you can get when you are a newbie. The bike steering feels super lite and shifting is easy. I guess you can say I'm self taught and possibly a natural. I feel like I can probably ride a 1000rr now and ready for the track. lol
Finally a person that's done what I'm planning to do! :D

Hopefully me taking the MSF course will give me some riding experience so I can actually ride my CBR home! :D
 

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Take it easy on the way home.

If you have zero experience before MSF, then you will likely need a bit of real world practise before you get things down pat.
 

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Is a naked bike one with everything showing?
Yes, a naked bike is one without all the plastic covers. Everything is visible. So if you drop it, there is less to damage. My Buell Blast is a nice cheap naked bike, but they went out of business 2 years ago :mad: You can still find them around cheap.

There are allot of other bikes which would also qualify.
 

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Lots of great advice here, but ultimately just make smart decisions. Don't buy a bike until you take the class so you know if you like riding or if you only liked the idea of riding. Don't be afraid to get a newer bike. yeah a used bike might be somewhat cheaper but chances are if you got a new or 1 year old CBR then rode it for a year or two you could get close to what you paid for it. Beginner bikes always have a good resale.

Limit yourself. If you are the type of person who likes to push the limits then don't get a 600. That is a quick way to get yourself hurt or worse. Ride the 250 for all she's got.
 

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Lots of great advice here, but ultimately just make smart decisions. Don't buy a bike until you take the class so you know if you like riding or if you only liked the idea of riding. Don't be afraid to get a newer bike. yeah a used bike might be somewhat cheaper but chances are if you got a new or 1 year old CBR then rode it for a year or two you could get close to what you paid for it. Beginner bikes always have a good resale.

Limit yourself. If you are the type of person who likes to push the limits then don't get a 600. That is a quick way to get yourself hurt or worse. Ride the 250 for all she's got.

^^ Smart advice. I'm very grateful I didn't give into friends telling me to get at least a 600 bike. 250 IS the way to go for newbies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
^^ Smart advice. I'm very grateful I didn't give into friends telling me to get at least a 600 bike. 250 IS the way to go for newbies.
I was thinking about a 600 after a friend (that has a 1000) said "well, if you get a 250 you're just setting yourself up to buy another bike.."
But then I looked at the insurance. Holy crap. If it wasn't financed, maybe -- but with collision it's like $5000/year.
 

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Hi Dylan

I ride 2 bikes, 1100 Guzzi Griso & 2011 CBR 250R.
Griso great tourer, CBR for my commute, but what a great fun ride, puts a smile on your face every time.
Only mod delkevil 450mm stainless exhaust, sounds a lot better than stock system.
250 has enough grunt to keep you out, or get you into trouble. Handles like a dream.
GET ONE AND ENJOY, HAPPY AND SAFE RIDING!
 
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