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I'm starting to see more stations offering ethanol-free in my area (WI).

Some of the stations (BP, Mobil, Amoco) have Premium in ethanol-free, while others of the same brand don't - so they must be able to choose. That means you need to look carefully at the pump. In this area, ethanol-free is about 10% more expensive than E10. As Stichill noted, you do get some mileage benefit from ethanol free over E10, but it doesn't fully equal out.

Some, not all, of the Cenex station offer ethanol-free in all grades.

The biggest benefit of ethanol-free comes when you have a steel gas tank. Ethanol contains and holds water, in addition to going bad quicker, so keeping your steel tank topped-off with ethanol-free gas will help reduce the chances of rust forming.

For older cycles, ethanol will attack seals and gaskets not made of newer materials that are ethanol safe.

For engines with carburetors, ethanol will lean the mixture, possibly making the engine run hotter. Newer small engines are tuned for E10, but when it first was introduced E10 was credited with damaging small engines like trimmers, edgers, snowblowers, etc., by leaning them out more than they already were.
 

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while there are genuine concerns about ethanol
as fuel, expressed in specialist publications etc
for all manner of petrol powered engines,
worldwide, which simply cannot be
some sort of globally manufactured hoax
or whatever,, for me there are also realities
which also concern some [incl me]
as to the contrived corruption based
process in my state [nsw aust] whereby
one company, has been given total monopoly,,
of ethanol market.. manildra a major 'contributor'
to politicians making such decisions, in millions..

nrma and other motoring groups and organisations
together with many individuals including specialist
or enthusiast groups, have expressed concerns
about being forced by govt directive
to put ethanol in their engines..

so even if ethanol was, gods gift to mankind,
some people dont like being told what to do
with their motorcycles or other engines..

call that a character fault, but this also adds to
my personal experiences with ethanol..
perhaps i present as 'bent' about ethanol..
but the arguments here have been based on
readily available facts of the matter..

to each their own..
 

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Well, I live in New England, which is a big area for sport fishermen due to it's many fresh water lakes and ponds and the proximity of the Atlantic Ocean. During the summer months it seems that every other car on the road is hauling a bass boat or Chris Craft.
I remember the first summer when ethanol was added to fuel here for the first time. Boat owners were positively insane about the damage the stuff was doing to their boat engines.
The fury and outcry from all of those outraged boat owners that first year didn't get any traction at all and the government basically said "too bad for you". Now that the ethanol manufacturers have established their own powerful lobby, ethanol isn't going anywhere.
I suppose we should be grateful that it's restricted to 10% by law at this point.
 

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Well, I live in New England, which is a big area for sport fishermen due to it's many fresh water lakes and ponds and the proximity of the Atlantic Ocean. During the summer months it seems that every other car on the road is hauling a bass boat or Chris Craft.
I remember the first summer when ethanol was added to fuel here for the first time. Boat owners were positively insane about the damage the stuff was doing to their boat engines.
The fury and outcry from all of those outraged boat owners that first year didn't get any traction at all and the government basically said "too bad for you". Now that the ethanol manufacturers have established their own powerful lobby, ethanol isn't going anywhere.
I suppose we should be grateful that it's restricted to 10% by law at this point.
In this area, I'm pretty sure Marinas sell ethanol-free gas.

Not sure if that's common or not.

I have seen Stabil Marine, which I believe is a treatment for gas with ethanol.

Stabil 360 Marine - https://www.goldeagle.com/product/sta-bil-360-marine
 

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Oh yeah, after that debacle marinas started offering ethanol-free gas at their earliest opportunity.
It wasn't just the loss of performance, but the 10% ethanol was destroying fuel lines in older engines and causing all sorts of havoc if your engine wasn't designed for the stuff. Of course many of the outboard motors that had to be repaired or scrapped had been used without incident for years, so the sudden onset of so many being trashed or requiring expensive repairs just because of the new formulation of gasoline really riled up the sport fishing community.
They've adapted since their protests didn't bear fruit, but it's extremely rare to see a "vintage" engine still being operated by anyone these days.
I sort of wish I lived closer to the ocean than I do, as it would dramatically increase my choices of places to get ethanol-free gas. As it is I only have 2 gas stations that sell it at all within a 25-mile radius of my home.
 

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Discussion Starter #47 (Edited)
In my experience, it is common for marina's to sell non-ethanol gasoline at their docks for use in watercraft, but in many cases at prices significantly higher compared to the prices which 'landlocked' service stations sell the same non-ethanol gas for. Last week I paid $3.099/gal for non-ethanol 90 octane (PON) premium at the gas & oil distributor here in Santa Fe. Whereas that same non-ethanol 90 octane (PON) premium can sell for as much as $5.00/gal or more at the full service marina docks. It's almost like paying as much for a single beer at a MLB or NFL game as what the price of a six pack is at the local store.

Back before E10, the owners of smaller trailerable boats would just buy their boat fuel on their way to the lake at the same local gas stations that they re-fueled their cars & trucks at. Then E10 showed up everywhere, with many of those local corner gas stations no longer offering the option of purchasing non-ethanol gas. So boat owners, and users of other small engines, were left with fewer options for buying non-ethanol gas.
 

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apparently fiberglass tanks for inboard engines
were also a problem with ethanol [strong solvent]..
rec-90 [apparently] intended for all 'recreational'
small engines.. [not in aust, here you need to
find outlets with ethanol free 91[ron]
or use more expensive 95/98ron
ethanol free..
 
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