Honda CBR 250 Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well I decided to do some appearance mods to the ole gal. Now I see alot of people like to powdercoat them but I have yet to see any kind of powder coating hold up for any length of time. It just does not impress me. I'm also going to paint some parts on my bike red. Also I painted them with real automotive urethane paint and I will put a red stripe on them also.

Started by removieng the wheels



Then the tires


Then sand blasting the wheels



Priming them with Epoxy primer and finally painting them semigloss black. They are still wet in the pic and they will dull out.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
freaking awesome! I was just thinking to myself today, "maybe i should paint my wheels black, i wonder who on the forum has back on black"

I went to wash my bike on my lunch and that dang grease brake dust stuff does not move. What better then black wheels to keep a clean look.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Wow, these came out really nice. Can't wait to see it put back together.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,894 Posts
You're doing a better job than I did with mine. :)

Lots of pics of black on black (oh sistah) on my blog. Just click on my sig.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
i hated silver rims at the beginning including all silver bits on my red bike as most of my bikes before had black rims. but later it grew on me man.
I like the silver bits now and the factory paint is good. Powder coating will come off after a month especially in Thai Mansoon and they charge a lot for a proper car like paint - 5000 thb - 160 USD- for two rim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,086 Posts
Well I decided to do some appearance mods to the ole gal. Now I see alot of people like to powdercoat them but I have yet to see any kind of powder coating hold up for any length of time. It just does not impress me. I'm also going to paint some parts on my bike red. Also I painted them with real automotive urethane paint and I will put a red stripe on them also.
i hated silver rims at the beginning including all silver bits on my red bike as most of my bikes before had black rims. but later it grew on me man.
I like the silver bits now and the factory paint is good. Powder coating will come off after a month especially in Thai Mansoon and they charge a lot for a proper car like paint - 5000 thb - 160 USD- for two rim
OK guys, I need to jump in here -

I've work professionally with both paint and powder, and can say absolutely that, when done properly, powder is significantly more durable than paint. The only exception may be OEM production paints. They are not the same as what you get over-the-counter at the paint store. Paint cures with a combination of solvent evaporation and chemical reaction. Powder cures by chemical cross-linking of resins. The difference is that cured paint lays on the part like a series of stacked layers, (properly) cured powder is more like a woven mat - greatly improving adhesion (chip resistance) and the overall strength.

If any of the steps in powder coating are not done properly/accurately, the powder will fail. Proper prep starts with the removal of the previous finish, producing the correct surface profile from blasting, applying a chemical conversion coat to improve adhesion and corrosion protection, applying powder at the proper thickness, and curing at the correct temp for the proper time. If any of those factors are not correct the finish will not last.

One common way to screw up powder coating is to have the coating done by a "production" shop instead of a "custom coater". A production shop has a conveyor line that moves the part though a system of washes, dryers, coating areas, and cure ovens. The problems come if the line is set-up to do small flat or light-weight pieces - and you are coating something like a cycle wheel. The time the wheel spends in the oven is nowhere near enough because of its added weight/density compared to their "normal" part. It will have enough heat to flow the powder so it looks right, but the chemical cross-linking was not completed - and the powder will fail. A "custom coater" doesn't use a conveyor, and can hold the part in the oven as long as necessary to let it reach its cure temp for as long as required.

Here's a link to some info I posted in another thread (post #27) - http://www.cbr250.net/forum/cbr250-appearance-modifications/2815-plasti-dip-spray-thread.html


Jay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
I know how it works, I'm a painter at a restoration and collision shop. However I am not a powder coater. But I have had stuff "professionally" done and have never been happy with it. Powder has no chip resistance and IMO it's brittle. Has zero flexabality and you can never touch up a chip with paint and have it match powder. it seems once you get a chip in powder it go's down hill fast. Atleast with paint I put flex addative in it and if you get a chip 9 times out of 10 it still has primer under the paint so it won't rust or in our case of aluminium corrode. I also have seen powder chalk out and look like crap after time. With paint if you scuff it up it can still be buffed. Can you do that with powder? I have no idea. IMO powder has it's place but this isnt it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,086 Posts
I know how it works, I'm a painter at a restoration and collision shop. However I am not a powder coater. But I have had stuff "professionally" done and have never been happy with it. Powder has no chip resistance and IMO it's brittle. Has zero flexabality and you can never touch up a chip with paint and have it match powder. it seems once you get a chip in powder it go's down hill fast. Atleast with paint I put flex addative in it and if you get a chip 9 times out of 10 it still has primer under the paint so it won't rust or in our case of aluminium corrode. I also have seen powder chalk out and look like crap after time. With paint if you scuff it up it can still be buffed. Can you do that with powder? I have no idea. IMO powder has it's place but this isnt it
The powder has not been done properly then.

Here are the videos I posted - the flexibility of powder is amazing.



Another common mistake is using an Epoxy powder that's not UV stable. With exposure to sunlight it will chalk and fade - again - not a proper use of a powder. There are powders rated "Super Durable" that can stand years of sun exposure and salt spray without chalking or fading.

I painted numerous racing kart frames with Epoxy primer and an Imron topcoat, only to have it chip the first time out. That's one of the main reasons I went into powder.

If the metal has been prepped properly before coating (chemical pretreatment) it will have corrosion resistance in the event of a chip. There are also powder primers (Epoxy, Zinc-rich) than can add extra levels of corrosion protection under a powder topcoat.

Powder can be sanded and buffed like wet paint.

I was trained in paint/body and also worked in auto collision repair for over 10 years.


Jay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I believe ya but like I said i'm a paint guy and that's what I do best. Another thing emron is like concrete it has no chip resistance what so ever. The paint I use now is made my Sikkens and i now use waterborn base. The clear I use is almost a grand for a gallon with hardeners and reducers....crazy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,086 Posts
I believe ya but like I said i'm a paint guy and that's what I do best. Another thing emron is like concrete it has no chip resistance what so ever. The paint I use now is made my Sikkens and i now use waterborn base. The clear I use is almost a grand for a gallon with hardeners and reducers....crazy
I don't agree with that.

DuPont Imron was developed for fleet and aviation use where supreme durability is a major factor. If it chipped easily, it wouldn't be a good choice for trucks or planes. At the time it was the most durable wet paint finish available, and I'm pretty sure it's still an industry leader in that area.


Jay
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
437 Posts
the paint looks cool (BLACK) that is,I went with power coating hi gloss filing all of the wheel flat & clean of all markings 1st. :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
706 Posts
I'm too lazy to pull my wheels off... Plus the other bike is taking up too much time as a project so I'm leaving my 250 as it is for now. I do like black wheels though.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,284 Posts
I think they look pretty nice, I didn't want to go full gloss as I figured it would be to much. I'll post some pics once I get the bike finished.
Good job on the rims. Once powder coated don't they look like completely different wheels? Gloss looks awesome and ties in the plastics nicely. are you planning on powder coating the levers as well?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I don't agree with that.

DuPont Imron was developed for fleet and aviation use where supreme durability is a major factor. If it chipped easily, it wouldn't be a good choice for trucks or planes. At the time it was the most durable wet paint finish available, and I'm pretty sure it's still an industry leader in that area.


Jay
I worked at a place that made cabs for trains and logging equipment and used emron on them. It gets as hard as a rock. When stuff get's that gard you give up something and that would be flexabality. I've been in the automotive refinishing business for over 12 years and I restore cars that cost more than the average house. But like i said they all have their place. You don't have to agree with anything I say I could care less.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top