Honda CBR 250 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 81 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I received my fork and the G3-S shock is on its way from Race Tech. I weigh 255 +-3 pounds now and ordered the shocks for canyons with root damaged roads. I put the fork on, adjusted the stock shock to it's highest setting and took a quick ride today. I really like how it is feeling now. The bike feels bigger and more capable because I am not using half the travel just sitting on it. I haven't put it through it's paces yet because it is dark, cold, wet and I was feeling too lazy to throw on my Aerostich suit. No gear no speed for me.

So far braking is so much better because the fork doesn't dive severely. In fact I didn't even notice the fork compressing until I released the brakes too quickly and it rebounded.

Downshifting feels a lot better now without the pogo effect while blipping and downshifting. I do feel that I learned a lot of smoothness with the old fork setup because it was like a pogo stick. It feels like the fork will take a lot of rider error out of the equation. Anyway, got some smooth downshifts and felt very confident doing them.

I can't wait to install the shock and really test it out when it warms up here. I just thought I'd let everyone know how I like the new fork.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
I am glued to this :D
I look forward to hearing about the shock.

Do the forks have any kind of adjust ability besides oil weight/level?

I'm guessing not and that all that is set internally (valve size etc..) by Race Tech but it doesn't hurt to ask.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I am glued to this :D
I look forward to hearing about the shock.

Do the forks have any kind of adjust ability besides oil weight/level?

I'm guessing not and that all that is set internally (valve size etc..) by Race Tech but it doesn't hurt to ask.
Everything in the fork is internal.

You could buy an aftermarket preload adjuster and it would function the same because the spring and the thing on top of the spring is similar to stock. The form I got back said it was set at 16mm of preload and so far I agree. It looks like that when I sit on it.

The shock will have adjustable ride height, rebound and preload. I kinda wish I went for hydraulic preload instead of traditional, but I couldn't justify the extra expense for a bike that will likely be my commuter in a year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Thanks for the info.
Before you install the shock could you take a couple pics?
Just so I have something to drool over while I wait. I have about 6 or 7 more months to wait until I can do the Race Tech thing on mine.

It's #1 on the list. It comes before any power upgrades because a well handling bike easily trumps an extra hp or two.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
311 Posts
This should be your very 1st upgrade after doing advanced courses to hone your riding skills. Dollar for dollar spent, it is the MOST POTENT MODIFICATION for improving your bikes handling above any horsepower boost, fuel box, engine mod, intake, exhaust, and header mods.
Race Tech Sportbike Suspension Review
Race Tech Sportbike Suspension Review - Motorcycle USA
If it shaved 2 seconds off of lap times on 600 Supersport bikes, imagine what it would do to our little 250 with it's budget pogo-stick suspension !!!
I am putting my money down on my words; my cycle will be in Corona at the Race Tech headquarters for a G3s rear shock transplant and front emulator installation Tuesday AM Dec 28th.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the info.
Before you install the shock could you take a couple pics?
Just so I have something to drool over while I wait. I have about 6 or 7 more months to wait until I can do the Race Tech thing on mine.

It's #1 on the list. It comes before any power upgrades because a well handling bike easily trumps an extra hp or two.
Sure, no problem.

I definitely agree that it should be number one on the list and I can't believe bikes are going out of the dealers without being properly set up for the rider. At least put the right spring in for crying out loud. My dealer didn't even fill my tank...show's how much they care.

It is a safety issue. I used to dread hitting those little reflectors when changing lanes because it felt like my tire was hopping or sliding over them. It felt like a brief loss of control. Today they don't matter. I feel more confident doing lane changes and swerving. I don't really worry about the front end.

Lot's of people think spending money on this bike is a waste, but I feel I am just making it the way it is supposed to be. The theory is that if it doesn't ride like a piece of junk, then I'll keep it longer. There is so much to learn and there is no way I will truly "outgrow" this bike. If I do sell it, then the person buying it is getting a safer bike. Doesn't bother me.

For comparison testing I went to a piece of road that was rough and used to launch the bike. Well, the road crews got to it and removed all the bumps. They must have done that within the last month. What a bunch of jerks! :p It is probably not a valid comparison though because I was probably bottoming out with the lighter spring. I guess I'll head to Mount Saint Helens when it gets warmer and try out that road. It is heavily root damaged and oh so twisty, what a dream it could be! I remember being fatigued on my way home because of all the bumps my body had to absorb. Perfect test for suspension improvement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
This should be your very 1st upgrade after doing advanced courses to hone your riding skills. Dollar for dollar spent, it is the MOST POTENT MODIFICATION for improving your bikes handling above any horsepower boost, fuel box, engine mod, intake, exhaust, and header mods.
Race Tech Sportbike Suspension Review
Race Tech Sportbike Suspension Review - Motorcycle USA
If it shaved 2 seconds off of lap times on 600 Supersport bikes, imagine what it would do to our little 250 with it's budget pogo-stick suspension !!!
I am putting my money down on my words; my cycle will be in Corona at the Race Tech headquarters for a G3s rear shock transplant and front emulator installation Tuesday AM Dec 28th.
I mostly agree. I would say first priority is get a safe bike. In my case I needed to get the proper springs for my...er eh...considerable weight. While I was at it why not go all the way?! Once "riding season" begins, as determined by the fair weather riders, advanced courses shall be my destination! I can't wait.

Did you do the toy for tots thing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
311 Posts
Hey tollarja,

I am in the same boat as you, as I weigh 225-230 lbs. Definitely more than this bike was built to balance on it's stock suspension. Also the roads in Los Angeles are in deplorable condition (translation : the shittest roads you can imagine). The roads are full of pot holes, ridges, bumps, cracked asphalt, seams that are separating leaving dangerous gaps even on the bloody freeways. The city of LA and the state of California are technically broke and cannot maintain the roads properly. I am literally standing up on my pegs 20% of the time using my legs as de facto shock absorbers to keep from being bounced and jolted all over the place on the seat. I also have to ride slowly and carefully in many places because the 250 feels like a jumping bean and unsettles easily with the stock suspension. So I will be able to report how the Race Tech suspension performs under crappy surface conditions in a day or two after the transplant.
Yes, I did the Toys for Tots promotion for a 10% discount.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Man, I have an idea about what the LA roads are like. I recently drove through Seattle using I-5 and the Mercer street exit. Fortunately we do have some money for roads...anyway...I-5 was grooved for repaving, has 1-2" gaps between slabs, sewer grates in the middle of turns, joints and mercer street has cracked pavements with potholes and train tracks. Not to mention impatient and aggressive drivers. I felt like I was taking a drive test for motorcycles. Just when I had negotiated one challenge, a new one appeared. It was quite overwhelming. I'll buy a dirt bike before I try it again.

I'm hoping you are an advanced rider and can really put the suspension through it's paces to give a better review than I. I think we have a few more months before I can ride every day. Enjoy the sun and smog!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Roads that have been ground for resurfacing are about as much fun as steel mesh bridge surface but on the bright side, think of how nice it will be once a good 2" to 4" of fresh blacktop goes down. Hopefully the company doing the work will do it right & make it smooth with very few irregularities. Hitting a low spot isn't so bad but hitting a high spot at high speed can be tush puckering or exhilarating depending on the situation. Hitting a high spot at high speed with suspension set badly can result in the need for new underwear :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
Roads that have been ground for resurfacing are about as much fun as steel mesh bridge surface but on the bright side, think of how nice it will be once a good 2" to 4" of fresh blacktop goes down. Hopefully the company doing the work will do it right & make it smooth with very few irregularities. Hitting a low spot isn't so bad but hitting a high spot at high speed can be tush puckering or exhilarating depending on the situation. Hitting a high spot at high speed with suspension set badly can result in the need for new underwear :)
love it when they resurface roads like that. Shiney black top smooth as glass. Some that were a bumpy ass hell to ride on were a dream to ride on afterward. But i swear around here they have one dept that fixes the roads and a 2nd dept that comes out it seems like weeks later that cuts big holes and trenches all over and covers them with rough ass patches. as for the suspension upgrade. That is alot of money to spend. But i guess its same as mountain bikes(pedal bike) The suspension forks on a 5k+ bike are a world apart in quality compared to a 1k bike. I think for me i would rather save the 2k$ in upgrades and put it towards a new bike like a Versys or V-Strom. The rear suspension on the Versys makes the CBR look like toy parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Yes it is very bloody expensive. But it's a fraction of the cost of a new bike.

If I won the Lotto (keep forgetting to buy tickets so no chance of that) I would quickly add three particular new bikes to the garage but I would keep the 250 as well.

It's light weight and low seat height makes it unmatched for everyday errand use. Plus being able to use everything it's got and not risk having the license revoked is priceless.
I live about 40 miles north of San Francisco and when I do have to go there I go there on the 250. It's so small, light & easy to push around that parking on the hills is an easy task. I can't say that about any other bike I've owned. Even my three fore mentioned 'fantasy bikes' would not be as useful as the 250.

I think this bike is deserving of the Race Tech treatment. Different strokes & all that I know. I guess it all depends on intended purpose and what one needs and such.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I bought it thinking it would keep me alive while I was learning to ride during my first three months. I planned to ditch it quick like a summer fling, but wouldn't you know it, like a cheesy movie, I actually love her. I found myself wondering "Why did they skimp on such a great little bike?" So I'm getting a few upgrades here and there to make her the way she should be. She's worth it. I've had a few weeks without her and I was sad. I am thoroughly convinced that once you learn to ride, you need at least two bikes. One to ride while you work on the other.

The other thing I learned is that I am progressing quickly, but not so quickly that I can outgrow this little CBR.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Yeah, mine grew on me like a fungus.
It's ridiculously anemic compared to what I was used to and I'll admit the first two days I was like "Meh, maybe I made a mistake".

Then I started getting used to her. I learned how to ride her the way she likes to be ridden and discovered a whole new world. A world that existed around the singular, simple, pure pleasure of riding. And on this bike it is all about the rider. Bench racing does not apply here :)

On past bikes if I went into a corner too slow I'd just twist the grip a little on my way out and get it right back. On this bike if I enter slow I leave slow. Getting it all right and keeping up corner speed is freaking exhilarating.

Unless I should suddenly become wealthy and have ridiculous amounts of money to burn, I have no reason to go back to riding 100+ hp machines.
I'm betting that with Race Tech goodness, this bike it will steer like the front wheel is in between the thumbs and that's where the fun is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
311 Posts
8 hrs surgery complete. Drove my CBR250 the 70 miles to Corona for a suspension transplant at 7:00 AM. The Race Tech doctors finished front and rear at 3:30 PM. The waiting room is a friggin museum of motorcycle nostalgia from the 1960's to the 1980's.
You would not believe the innovations and historical info I browsed through. A whole litany of moto-gods used Race Tech's services and left autographed love letters plastered all over the walls. I was tripping over trophies and plaques.
Unfortunately, I was not allowed into the surgical room to photograph or video tape the transplant operation on my CBR250R.
As soon as I fired her up for the 70 mile trip home, I noticed how firm the suspension felt. The pogo-stick tendencies of the front end were completely gone. The bike was stable riding over road irregularities and bumps. She did not protest running over gaps in the superslab sections on the freeway. Open seams and ripples did not ruffle her feathers anymore. She never lost her cool even running through a pot hole. WOW !!
IT A DIFFERENT BIKE !!! Honda should sell them on the showroom floor with an option for an upgraded Race Tech suspension package. This was worth every penny of the $ 1400 dollars spent. That's my opinion from a 70 mile drive home.
 
  • Like
Reactions: RubenAlonzo

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
SWEET!
Thank you for the update. The whole suspension upgrade thing is just one of those things that you can't fully fathom until you've actually experienced it.

I'm delighted to hear how well it's worked out for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
what were the model numbers for the kits you got? I looked briefly at the parts list for the CBR but there is alot there and not sure what is included. Also the kits did not come to $1500 so not sure if i was looking at same thing you got.

Once the weather gets better around here and i get a chance to ride the bike for longer i can decide if this is an upgrade i want to do. Like mentioned, be nice if Honda offered this as an option. Wonder if you could use parts from other Honda bikes like from the 600r?

I would draw the line at cylinder upgrade kits tho. When people talk about wanting to do this it cheaper in long run to just get a bigger bike. Be nice if Honda could offer this bike in 3 versions. 125.250 and 400cc

The Ninja 400 was one i considered but reports were that it was a "dummed down" 650 - the weight and size of the 650 minus the power. so i went with the new Honda CBR250ra.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
The 250's triple trees limit fork diameter to 37mm. 600rr forks are 41mm or 43mm. I can't recall which.

You would need to find a 37mm alternative or try to source new triple trees that would work or have custom ones made which would be brutally expensive if it's a 'one off' item. Meaning they're only making the one. They (the machinists) would need to recoup the cost of running the machine plus the cost of design & materials.

Then it's all experimental after that :)

Keep an eye on Thailand. T'would appear that they are doing such things to their 250's over there. They are quite ingenious when it comes to this bike.
 
1 - 20 of 81 Posts
Top