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The screws that get stuck probably haven't heard of your interesting theory. Even if there is a special anti-slip socket, it is possible to destroy a screw that is properly stuck.

Honda gives the tightening torque to the NUT (75Nm 55Lbf) and NOT the bolt.
But to release a pair of nut and screw, like in this case, it is better to go to the head of the screw and not the nut.
SnapOn does have a socket design they call "Flank Drive" which focuses the force on the flats of the nut more than the peaks. May not have made any difference in this situation. Cutting the heads off is the only way to go for this.

If I was installing them, I'd be using a socket on the nut anyway.

55 ft/lbs is a bit much for those nuts/bolts IMO. My son's Yamaha had larger fasteners that listed the torque at 70 ft/lbs - and he stripped them out.

I'd be careful using 55 ft/lbs on those.
 

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SnapOn does have a socket design they call "Flank Drive" which focuses the force on the flats of the nut more than the peaks. May not have made any difference in this situation. Cutting the heads off is the only way to go for this.
I have such a set, if the point is to remove the screw at any cost, then this patent is relevant. The patent (see the picture below) grabs the nut and does not let go, the result:
The screw will break, without damage to the nut (Same result as with the disc).
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Originally the patent was intended to overcome a screw head that was destroyed as a result of using an inappropriate tool, etc... but yes, it is also possible to use it to break a stubborn screw.
55 ft/lbs is a bit much for those nuts/bolts IMO.
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No matter what the book says - 55 ft/lbs is too much for that size fastener.

It will snap like a twig or strip.

Most caliper and fork mounting bolts of that size require about 26 ft/lbs.

The 24mm rear axle nut on a cycle I recently worked on called for 60 ft/lbs.
jkv357 you have a right to be upset. BUT 75Nm these are absolutely reasonable values for our rear sprocket NUT. These are screws/nut reinforced with high grade hardened metal. And even though you are talking about factor 2, a reinforced bolt may be much stronger than factor 2.
Our rear axle nut torque is 88Nm(65lb/f).
 

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I think #7/12 (top row, 5th one over) has been damaged by attempted removal or over-torquing. That's why it looks like a Torx. The others do not.
ohhh yes:coffee::coffee::coffee:
There are signs of struggle on one head screw. I'll clean them and we see what I find behind the dirt???
BUT No 5 at the row is definitely Torx-T45.
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ohhh yes:coffee::coffee::coffee:
There are signs of struggle on one head screw. I'll clean them and we see what I find behind the dirt???
BUT No 5 at the row is definitely Torx-T45.
View attachment 45667
No, that's regular hex socket-cap that's had torx bit forced into it. You can see upturned edges where sharp torx corner was forced in. And see former flat-sides of hex. Can also see on hex bolt that flat-sides have edge where it transition to new torx corner. Parts that hex bit didn't touch remain same as hex bolt.

Real torx has much more pronounced corners and sides are curved without transition edge.

 

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No, that's regular hex socket-cap that's had torx bit forced into it.
Danno I really like your creativity and the investment in the special photo, you are my champion. Now you tell me, a bolt head made of reinforced metal, and a torx key T-45 forced into it... because to me your idea sounds like science fiction. But maybe ET visited my motorcycle, then anything is possible. Wait patiently for cleaning and we all together see it clean.
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No matter what the book says - 55 ft/lbs is too much for that size fastener.

It will snap like a twig or strip.

Most caliper and fork mounting bolts of that size require about 26 ft/lbs.

The 24mm rear axle nut on a cycle I recently worked on called for 60 ft/lbs.
Yeah, I suspect some budding Honda engineer just out of school pulled max-torque numbers out of book for 10mm chromoly bolt without looking at actual loads faced by interface. Soichiro Honda did something similar in his beginning years. He took design of race team and scratched out all instances of "steel" and replaced with "titanium" and replaced everything "titanium" with "aluminium" and anything made from "aluminium" was replaced with "magnesium"... His "new and improved" bike lasted less than 2-laps before engine seized and died... :ROFLMAO:

In this case, it would've been easier to have sprocket-carrier with thicker threaded arms. Then regular 8mm shoulder bolts (like front-brakes) could've been used with more normal 30-lb*ft torque. That works fine for brake-rotors in front and they face much, much higher-loads than rear-sprocket.

This is very un-Honda like design. Compared to Toyota, which has beefy solid con-rod bolts, Honda engines used FEA'd-to-max hollow bolts that weigh only 1/2 as much. Perhaps it's concession to keep costs low. Just use off-the-shelf huge bolt, who cares about weight in this category of bikes.
 

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No, that's regular hex socket-cap that's had torx bit forced into it. You can see upturned edges where sharp torx corner was forced in. And see former flat-sides of hex. Can also see on hex bolt that flat-sides have edge where it transition to new torx corner. Parts that hex bit didn't touch remain same as hex bolt.

Real torx has much more pronounced corners and sides are curved without transition edge.

That would make sense.

Using a Torx bit, hammered into a stripped Hex, is one way to get some grip on it.

It works.
 

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All my screw heads were cleaned and checked.
Danno is right about the torx that they pushed in with force.
YES jkv357 4 more rounded, and only one remains good hex, all the six are Allen. Tomorrow I will try to clean the nuts and inspect them as well.
 

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