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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, was adjusting my chain slack (very minimal turns on adjusting nuts required) correctly (every turn i made on the left swingarm, i did to the right as well). Anyways, when i checked the alignment, there's an extra notch on the left swingarm. The distance between the last notch and the rear edge on each side are the same but as i said, there's an extra indicater notch on the left. Does this mean my wheel is misaligned by an entire notch? If so, how do i go about fixing it. Cheers.

Ps, i can add photos if anyone's confused
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ok don't worry guys, I figured it out.

Yes, it does constitute as a misalignment.
I was having trouble getting the right swingarm forward a notch (because pulling the left swingarm back a notch would've completely wrecked the chain) because it wasn't budging at all after loosening the adjuster nut. I figured out that it wasn't moving because the bike was being held up by a rear stand. I just popped it back down on it's normal side stand, loosened up the axle nuts and adjustment nuts, gave the wheel a good shake and bang - all good.

Just thought I'd leave this here to show that the weight on the swingarms (when using a rear stand) does have an effect on the adjustments.
 

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Don't worry about the notches, measure from the centre of the swing arm bolt to the centre of the axle bolt . As long as both sides are the same the wheel is in line.
 

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Don't worry about the notches, measure from the centre of the swing arm bolt to the centre of the axle bolt . As long as both sides are the same the wheel is in line.
Right - that's all that really matters.

Here's a good video that includes that tip as well as the proper way to set the chain slack. It's often not done properly, and can cause all sorts of problems.

Video | How to Adjust a Motorcycle Chain | CanyonChasers
 

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Luckily the adjusters on our bikes seem to be very close; some factory indicators can be off by several millimeters, which causes all sorts of hell to handling and tires.
 

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Jkv357 the question was about wheel alignment not chain slack. Your attitude sux mate.
 

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cant see how 'weight on swingarms using a rearstand
can effect adjustments' or alignments..
swingarms pivot/arc equally regardless..

axle can move forward or back either side
[for adjustments] until axle bolt is secured..

rear stands have many advantages incl making
adjustments and aligning wheel and chain..
usually includes cleaning and lubing chain
plus rear wheel cleaning, much easier
and better on a rear stand..

joboo is correct [obviously] on distance between
swingarm pivot and axle for alignment..
notches are based on that relationship
and are more for convenience..
its a simple and well established system
which works ok for the average rider..

its handy to be able to turn and spin the wheel
[thus chain on its sprockets] during maintenance
and cleaning.. one final check is to sight along
the upper chain run [like sighting a rifle etc]
to test for slight bowing either way..
when aligned chain runs straight
without side pressure on links..

there are heaps of videos out there
on wheel maintenance, changing tyres
aligning and adjusting etc, often by
genuine motorcycle mechanics
and typically in rear stands..
 

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Jkv357 the question was about wheel alignment not chain slack. Your attitude sux mate.
Hmmmm...

My attitude sucks? Really? I was agreeing with what you wrote, not correcting you - did you get that?

Chain adjustment and wheel alignment are pretty closely related - don't you think? I'm just trying to give him (and anyone else that may be interested) a bit more info about the subject. Plenty of riders here don't know the proper way to adjust the chain - or check the wheel alignment. That video showed both.

Seriously, lighten up...mate...
 

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Sorry mate, I must have misinterpreted your comment as sarcasm . It sounds that way when read out loud. I appolagise .
 

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Sorry mate, I must have misinterpreted your comment as sarcasm . It sounds that way when read out loud. I appolagise .
No problem - I though that's probably what happened. I didn't mean for it to sound sarcastic, but I see how it could have.
 

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Hey everyone newbie here I own 2012 cbr 250r and I’m new to motorcycles,
I purchased the alignment tool for the chain that goes on top of the rear sprocket and has a sighting rod to help with alignment, but When going to adjust the axle I get that you loosen the axle nut and let’s say that the rod when looking down the chain was slightly tapered to the right, ideally we could correct this by sliding the axle on the right side back, but in order to do that, would we have to loosen the chain adjusting bolts on only the right side and pull the wheel in order to bring the axle back into proper alignment, this way it will keep proper chain slack?

sorry for the newbie question!
 

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Honda: INNOVA125i(2010); CBR250R(2013)
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in order to do that, would we have to loosen the chain adjusting bolts on only the right side and pull the wheel in order to bring the axle back into proper alignment, this way it will keep proper chain slack?
Hi. NO it isn't "keep proper chain slack".
By the way, an excellent question.
When you are moving ONLY the right side of the axle forward at a rate of X millimeters, the angle of the rear sprocket changes at a rate of Y degrees (The alignment issue), and the rear sprocket also advances forward at a rate close to 0.1X millimeters (The slack issue).
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Check this out for some tips on chain adjustment and alignment -

 

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Thank you for the video that was helpful my confusion is stuck around how do I actually move the forward and back, my issue I am having is my right side swing arm measurement is out maybe 1-2mm from the left side and I want to correct it to be exact, so i would need to slide the right section of the axle back,
in order to do that based on what I read in the service manual, I would have to loosen the axle nut, then loosen the chain tensioner nuts in that side and just pull the axle back, and theoretically that should slide the right portion back?

[/QUOTE]
 

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Thank you for the video that was helpful my confusion is stuck around how do I actually move the forward and back, my issue I am having is my right side swing arm measurement is out maybe 1-2mm from the left side and I want to correct it to be exact, so i would need to slide the right section of the axle back,
in order to do that based on what I read in the service manual, I would have to loosen the axle nut, then loosen the chain tensioner nuts in that side and just pull the axle back, and theoretically that should slide the right portion back?

If I'm following correctly, you need to loosen the axle nut (don't loosen all the way, just enough to get the adjusters to slide easily and stay where you put them), back-off the adjuster bolt on the side that needs to go forward, and tap the axle on that side to move it ahead.

There is some trial and error required to get the chain slack just right. Locate the spot in the rear wheel's rotation where the slack is the tightest, and make a note of the position of the valve stem. That's where you need to set the slack.

Using an Allen Wrench in between the rear sprocket and chain to pull the wheel firmly forward (like in the video) is the key. Snug the axle nut, but don't crank it down, as you may need to make slight adjustments. Loosen it if you do. Once you have confirmed you have the axle sitting perfectly in alignment, you can make your adjustments based on how much you are turning the adjusters - meaning 1/8 turn on the right...1/8 turn on the left...

When everything is set, and confirmed, torquing the axle nut to the proper torque is a good idea.

When I carefully checked my rear wheel alignment, and was positive it was correct, I put punch marks on each adjuster bolt at the same position - say 12:00. That way it was easy to keep them in sync, and the axle in alignment, during adjustment.

Make sense?
 
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