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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Put bike on stand with spools.

*If you do not have spools and stand
leave sidestand down, steering turned to the left.
Put trolley jack under suspension linkage and get the rear wheel 20mm off ground.





You DO NOT have to loosen the chain adjusters.
You DO NOT have to remove caliper.


Remove Axle nut with 24mm socket while holding axle with 19mm ring spanner.
Slide axle out while supporting wheel.



Allow wheel to move down to floor, this will make chain go slack.
Lift chain off to the left and hang it over the lhs.
roll wheel out to the rear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)



Now replacing-
Remove & clean the spacers, wipe the seals and regrease the seal lips and carefully line everything up and intall in reverse order.
Grease or never seize the axle to make it easy next time.
I cleaned the sprocket at the same time removing the sprocket hub and also regreased the O ring and surfaces.
Make sure the brake caliper slider sits true in its slot in the swingarm.
Careful with the ABS sensor, never allow it to jam anything.
Dont pinch the ABS lines against anything.
Put the chain on before slipping the axle in while you hold the wheel up.
Slide the axle in and just do up the axle nut up lightly
Check and double check chain tension (no less than 30-35mm)
and that each adjuster mark is EXACTLY the same each side.
Spin the wheel a few times,
knock the axle forward with a soft mallet.
Make sure the caps on the end of the swingarm are sitting in place and square.
Take the bike off the stand.
Make sure the 'hooks' on the axle (that contact the bottom of the swingarm) are in contact with the swingarm and sit level.
Tighten axle nut to 88 N-m/65 ft-lb.
OR- ignore all this and just read page 82 of the manual :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
But on another one of those pages in the manual, it states to set chain slack between 20-30mm, whereas you suggest "no less" than 30-35mm.
And in 1000 other threads we have noobs destroying new chains by overtightening.
Lets not thrash it out again.
 

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One thing I'd add to this is be careful to not mix up the spacers. The two spacers are different sizes. If you do happen to mix them up the one that goes on the brake side of the wheel is about 1/4 inch bigger than the one for the sprocket side. If you mix them up the wheel still will go back on but the disk for the brake will rub against the brake assembly and the wheel will not spin freely.
 

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But on another one of those pages in the manual, it states to set chain slack between 20-30mm, whereas you suggest "no less" than 30-35mm.
And in 1000 other threads we have noobs destroying new chains by overtightening.
Lets not thrash it out again.
Aufitt is absolutely right... anything less than 30 mm of free play, or slack will lead to a much shorter service life from the chain, as the link pins and roller bushings will wear faster as a result of running the chain too tight. This gradual increase in the link pin/roller bushing clearances through wear is why the chain becomes longer. Drive chains don't stretch, they become worn out. And all the chain lube in the world won't make up for a drive chain that is tensioned too tight.

Honda's warning about excessive chain free play, not to go beyond 1.5" (38 mm) as this could result in the chain coming off the sprockets, is valid and should be followed.

I set my chain free play back when the bike was new, at 1.250" (32 mm) and it has remained consistent at that measurement over the past 9000+ miles. I expect to get a lot more miles out of this original chain before having to replace it.
 

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And in 1000 other threads we have noobs destroying new chains by overtightening.
Lets not thrash it out again.
I'd not heard that. I don't read a thousand posts. I read the service manual. Is 25-30 mm slack tighter for noobs versus the rest of us? Wow. Honda should recall all the service manuals and owners manuals then. I set mine at 25 mm and have 19K miles, still within the first notch on adjuster, and can barely lift the chain away from the rear sprocket. Go figure.
 

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if you push down hard on the chain then push up hard, you might get a reading 6-10 mm bigger than if you just flop the chain up and down to measure. I have always just flopped the chain up and down but I can imagine someone setting it too tight by forcing it up and down and think they have more slack than they actually do.

also I have seen guys that think the measurement is like the width of a slot that would limit the chain up and down...they go from the bottom of the plates when its down and to the top of the plates when its pushed up....instead of seeing it as a centerline measurement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'd not heard that. I don't read a thousand posts. I read the service manual. Is 25-30 mm slack tighter for noobs versus the rest of us? Wow. Honda should recall all the service manuals and owners manuals then. I set mine at 25 mm and have 19K miles, still within the first notch on adjuster, and can barely lift the chain away from the rear sprocket. Go figure.
Good for you,

now go threadsh1t elsewhere.
I'm here to help.
 
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Good for you,

now go threadsh1t elsewhere.
I'm here to help.
How funny. I wouldn't expect the Queen of threadsh!tters to be so sensitive on the subject.

Per your comment, you are attempting to keep noobs from over tightening their chains by suggesting everybody else under tighten them by going outside of Honda's spec, which is perfectly adequate if one has any right to be near a wrench. It's rather ironic when a Honda fan boy believes Honda can do no wrong, then when somebody points out that the fan boy is contradicting their God's Word, the fan boy calls the other guy a threadsh!tter. Priceless.

Honda has given us a perfectly safe and adequate slack specification, and it is, in fact, not helpful at all to forum members when one person comes along and says to adjust the slack to "no less than 35mm," then another person comes along and states that one should adjust the slack to "no more than 38mm... per Honda" (Honda's warning in the manual is actually 50mm, not 38mm, and it refers to frame damage, not the chain coming off the sprocket.) And you believe all this input is actually helpful to anybody, especially a noob, whom you now expect to adjust a chain to within 3mm slack? Oh, but wait, yet a third person comes along and observes that there can be a 6-10mm variance depending on how hard one presses on the chain. All this amounts to nothing more than static, not helpfulness, and all the while Honda is in the back row saying, "Um, over here... 20-30mm of slack is good." Too many "helpful" cooks in the pot here, trying to cater to too wide an audience, with the end effect of causing some people to adjust their chains unnecessarily loose.
 

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One thought and I'll step back. I'm 66 and seen a lot of chains, noobs, mechanical abuse and mistakes. My thinking now is for most guys to shoot for the middle of the range when servicing. Then any variation in technique. Skill, chain irregularities , measurement error, etc will still result in a acceptable result. Long ago I used to figure ste it to the min and don't adjust until it wears to the max but I think that's way off. If there's a optimum, I think it must be mid spec, so adjust back to mid spec when it is found to be off by about 25% from the wear limit to keep things at about midway. An experienced person may want to fine tune but that's up to them. Just my opinion.
 

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Can anyone recommend a grease to use for the O-ring and seals to use on the sprocket hub? I'm new to maintenance and would like to buy the correct type. Brand/type would be very helpful as I am close to a lot of auto parts stores and will call around.

Thanks!
 

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It's usually written on the can whether a spray is good for o-ring chains. Just read the stuff printed on the can. I'm not sure whether there are any bad sprays to get as long as they are made for your chain type. But that's a noob's answer, so maybe some of the more experienced members here can ad something to this.
 

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Hi Shroeder,

Thanks. I will keep an eye out for that. Also, I'm more thinking about the grease that's on the sprocket...bearings? I'm replacing the rear sprocket and saw grease there and that's mostly what I'm referring to.
Sorry, I misread your question. I thought you meant chain lubrication...:rolleyes:
 

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Another thing to keep an eye out for is that chain's do not stretch in an uniform manner.
This may apply more to higher power bikes or non o-ring chains, but it's best to rotate the chain till you find the tightest spot and adjust from there. In the past I have tightened a chain at a loose spot only to roll the bike and find the chain humming tight in another spot.
 

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AUFITT,

Your wisdom is undeniable. But if I may...Rather than using a mallet. After just finger tightening the axle I use a 5 or 6mm hex key and place it between the sprocket and the chain and roll the tire backwards so the hex key is "wedged" between the two. Snug but not trying to cut the key in half. Then hold the tire in place with my shin, then torque. The pressure of the key forces the axle forward evenly against the adjusters. And nobody calls the cops for you beating a defenseless motorcycle with a mallet. Can't be too careful now days. And if the adjusters were moved then measure from the center of the swing arm pivot cap to the center of the axle, do this on both side to be sure both sides measure evenly. Just my thoughts....Oh crap here comes the sh** storm. ;-)
 

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One could apply the mallet to the pneumatic tire to snug the adjusters before re-tightening the axle.
 
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