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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have 5,000 miles on my bike. 4,000 ridden in a tuck on the highway. 1,000 in a tuck in the dark. If you change screens, stay with clear so you can see through it at night. I alternate from peeking just over the windscreen if it is raining which leaves my face shield magically clear of water and fog, to looking through the top 1/3 of the screen to get away from the wind noise and to get the best performance, or scooting forward on the seat to put my helmet in the wind to hold up my head and rest my neck. Taller riders can also use this position on the perfectly shaped tank with the wind pushing just over the shoulders and under their chin where you are left with just the inherent noise of the helmet. It is very comfortable and relaxing to devour miles of highway this way. The CBR250R is a dart on the highway when ridden on the tank. Roll on from 100kph for passing trucks is quick. Side winds are self corrected by the bike as the wheels move away from the gust effectively and automatically leaning the bike into the wind to keep the headlight right on line even as the bottom of the bike drifts back and forth. It feels like a flying motorcycle from Star Wars when tucked and the wind can't steer the bike by pushing your body when you are anchored to the tank. The big mirrors offer a perfect view. Even better than when you are sitting up. The steering geometry is excellent. Very stable at speed but still maneuverable. I have never felt even a hint of an oscillating tank slapper setting in, yet can change my line anywhere I want it with a slight push or pull on the bar to counter steer the bike. As Redline said, "might as well take out a book and have a read". Or put on some tunes through your in ear canal phones which get two birds stoned as they entertain while protecting your hearing from the crazy tearing noise that comes off the top of the stock screen at speed. I even added some super plush neoprene padding to the front of my jacket to absorb the jolting expansion joints of the super slab. It is very comfortable to ride this way and I can honestly say that I have no idea what a pain in the butt is. The seat has a lot of room to slide back on and the shape and height of tank are perfect. I would like to prove the efficacy of this style by doing a couple Iron Butt 1,000s next summer after I get the rest of my gear and luggage dialed in.
 

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No rider training (road or track) will ever recommend this on so many levels.

Dangerous and lacks control,
Weight shift almost impossible for cornering and braking,
Not enough weight on the pegs to control the bike,
visibily of your surroundings severely limited,
Perifial vision is cactus,
You are looking thru a tiny line at the top of your visor.
Others wont see you as easily.
You cant as easily glance road_mirror_ road_ speedo_road etc.
Neck will take a beating.
Arms bent way too much.
...... I wont go on lol...
Police and other motorists will think you are speeding.
Other bike riders will LTFAO at you.

All to save 1 cent a trip? no thanks.. I'd rather be in control than be a tankbag.

Wind noise? get a decent and well fitting helmet, I have no noise at 100mph.
Butt pain? ride with your feet more.

Sorry but I have to say this in case you give noobs any weird ideas and they think they are Stacey on the back straight at Qatar GP.
 
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i hate to say it, i usually make fun of people riding tucked in on the highway because i think they think they look like racers. also, when i tuck in i can't see anything around me. the only time i tuck is at the track on the straights, or if it's raining cats and dogs. otherwise i think it's a waste of energy, pain in my back, and keeps me from seeing or being seen. but to each his own
 

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Also if a Cat dog or wildlife runs out , brick or rock falls from a truck on the road etc and BANG.. front wheel will be taken out from under you one millisecond without and chance to react, or the body positioning to at least try and save it.
 

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someone explained this to me as well, your body is the last shock absorber on the bike. so if you go over a bump and can't "give" as the bike comes up it could unsettle the bike. you want to have the flexibility to be mobile on the bike if unexpected circumstances come up
 

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Sendler the rider in that pic is doing nothing like you are mentioning...
that is a supersport or Superbike rider cornering fast in the wet at 200kph, his backbone is off the bike to keep the bike slightly more upright than he is ,as its wet.
He isnt 'Tucked' he's covering the bike.

Somewhere on this forum is a great pic of a member on a Mountain road crouched because he's going very very fast with the knee down cornering hard..
its their own thread...

Please do a rider training course.
 

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track riding is in a controlled environment where you aren't going to have someone in a car cut you off, debris on the road (hopefully), pot holes, etc. you don't need to be as aware necessarily and can focus on going forward and going fast. i don't believe tucking in has any benefit for street riding
 

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The only time I tuck is at highway speeds in very rainy, windy conditions. I have found no need otherwise. If I want to lie down, I will do it on the couch or in bed:cool: Also, not to be picky but, IMHO, I choose not to wear boots with laces on a bike. (sorry Sendler, just an observation re: your pic);)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Laces tucked too

The only time I tuck is at highway speeds in very rainy, windy conditions. I have found no need otherwise. If I want to lie down, I will do it on the couch or in bed:cool: Also, not to be picky but, IMHO, I choose not to wear boots with laces on a bike. (sorry Sendler, just an observation re: your pic);)
I wondered if someone would razz me about the loose laces. I always tuck them into my boots when riding. That was just a quick photo op as my daughter was coming out the door while I was working on the bikes. I'm also glad to see that you have found how much safer the little Honda is in the wind if you hug the tank despite the peer pressure to conform to an idealized standard of appearance.
 

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it's not an idealized standard of appearance, it's proper seating position on this type of bike. if you were meant to lay down it would be built like a drag bike with the rear sets way far back and lower clip on's. if you want to be safe, be visible, and have a good clear view of the road, i'd sit up
 

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For the most part, I tuck in only on the highway in windy and rainy conditions as well. Depending on the speed I'm riding at, I will sometimes tuck in when overtaking another vehicle too, to complete the pass more quickly. It is true that you reduce your field of vision considerably when tucked in so I imagine one would be putting themself at increased risk in this position - particularly if they rode in this manner all the time. I must admit though - that I love the feel of tucking in on the tank. And while it would be arrogant and naive to assume that I think I am a racer when in this position - I do feel more like a racer on the occasions when I do this. And for me, it contributes to my enjoyment of riding. If I tried my utmost to reduce all the risks involved in riding a motorcycle - I probably wouldn't have much fun - partly because it would require that I stop riding altogether. On the other hand, I suppose I could then focus on being more self-righteous about how I am a safer rider than everyone else when posting on motorcycle forums.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I do

i'd sit up
I do obviously recommend sitting up whenever there is any traffic and around town to present the maximum visibility. Nobody said you have to be glued to the tank no matter what. Droning along on the super slab in your lane with your speed matched to all the other traffic, the CBR250R is much more stable in the wind blast when ridden in a tuck. Many people, new and experienced, have posted about this bike being too light. I am offering a suggestion of an advanced riding technique that makes crosswinds less of an issue. And, you are just as close or closer to the ideal, flexed like a cat, emergency body position, when riding in a tuck than you are when sitting straight up. I still hover to soak up a bump and can stand to see over a rise in the road just as quick. The view in the mirrors is bigger and better with your body forward. Racers spend the entire race in a tuck to get the maximum control and aerodynamics. Why wouldn't you do it on the super slab where there are no driveways or side streets and the wind conditions and handling actually favor a lower side profile?
 

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Racers spend the entire race in a tuck to get the maximum control and aerodynamics. Why wouldn't you do it on the super slab where there are no driveways or side streets and the wind conditions and handling actually favor a lower side profile?
because racers are in a controlled environment and there aren't idiots who don't check their blind spots, or squirrels, or pieces of tires that have shredded off a car. racers also race, generally speaking, on one line. they don't have to worry as much about making emergency maneuvers, checking over their shoulders, watching out for people merging, etc. the responsibility for making safe passes is on the person doing the passing, and the person in front is expected to hold their line. i understand your point on reducing wind, but i'm a 5' tall girl and i commute an hour to school on my bike, all highway. to me the wind factor is negligible and it's more important for me to be visible to everyone, and see everything clearly
 

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Perhaps I may be speaking out of turn, but I don't think Sendler is advocating riding in a permanent tuck position. Adjusting one's riding position in windy/rainy weather is a part of riding....and safely! I tuck only in windy/rainy weather when necessary. And sometimes when I decide to crack the throttle wide open lol. Double R girl......you're 5ft....you're already in a crouched postion on this bike. I know that as I too am vertically challenged and I'm a light weight. Consider however the guys who ride this bike who are 6ft plus, they would have to adjust their position in some weather conditions otherwise they'd become a sail! Anyways, tucked or no tuck...if a rogue squirrel came runing across the road, or TRACK, it would suck. Even more so on a track at 220kph! :eek: Of course this is my humble opinion in whom, BTW, likes my loud yosh exhaust....and I go to track day too!:p

Race tracks are STATIC envirornments. They are as controlled as they can possibly be...as long as blown tires, squirrels, and stupid riders dont wipe you out. RIP Simmonelli
 

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ride how ever you feel most safe. comfort comes 2nd.
i don't see too many racers not tucking when they hit the throttle.
i tuck it up on the highways when i hit the throttle.especially on this bike.

i didnt read the whole post but someone probably already said this, if im on it im tucking, but if im cruising ???...no, unless my arms are done or is really cold or rain.:)



karma..she could be a "B" or a Lady...that's up to you ;)
 

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Very rarely ride like this.

Really only when in perfect conditions on a straight and I want to see if I can top the high speed (currently 162kph indicated).

I personally don't like the lack of control that your body has over the bike.... Plus on a 250 I think it looks a bit silly. Full racing positioning on your nice bike as a Honda Civic with mom and her four kids in it over takes you. :D
 
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