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I'd like to have an honest, no PC discussion about people who commute on their bikes and whether they wear jeans or riding pants with armor.

I have a real hard time getting mine on and off and would rather not be at the office undressing for 10 minutes every day.

I know the flip side is serious road rash on my lower body. However, in all honesty most bikes I see during commute times have riders wearing jeans.

I guess I'm just trying to see how crazy I am for considering it instead of the pants with armor.

Thoughts?

'njoy,
awk
 

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i honestly just wear jeans and change my shoes or whatever at work. but i do have the jr alter ego pants which i wear occasionally to work
 

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I wear Bilt (available from CycleGear) textile pants with the knee protection over my work pants. They're a price performer, but they're perfed, so I can wear them even when it's 90+ like it was yesterday. I also wear a Bilt perf jacket that zips to the pants.

This is NOT world-class protection like you would get from a good set of leathers (or even better textiles). However, the hope is that it will at least keep road rash to a minimum if I hit the pavement unexpectedly.
 

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Knee armour

For right now I am riding in my work pants but have been thinking of hunting through my basement to find my rollerblade knee armour which should fit right under my pants and would barely show. If I ever went on a tour where it could be rainy or cold I would go for something like a tourmaster pant to match my jacket.
 

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I have cordura riding pants i put on over my shorts..a field sheer mesh riding jacket..and riding boots...helmet,gloves.....it is a pain butt to change to leave the house..get to work...take off the gear in parking lot..put on tennis shoes...stuff pants and boots in tank bag (cuz thats all that will fit)..then take everything inside to work....end of night-put on gear..change shoes for boots....ect..ect

I also go out on my dinner break..tonite i almost didnt put on any gear before going out because of the hassle...but i figured with my luck..the one time i dont wear it will be the one time i go down or someone puts me down so im forcing my self to wear full gear every single time i ride...i figure ill get faster putting it on and taking it off over time and get used to doing it so it doesnt bother me as much
 

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I have a pair of Joe Rocket mesh riding pants with knee, hip, and kidney armor. They really aren't that hot in the summer and are easy to put on and take off due to the full leg zipper. For commuting back and forth to work I'd say I wear them half he time. If I wear shorts I put the riding pants on over top of them. If I wear jeans I usually don't use my riding pants.

Now, if I'm hitting the highway for any reason I put on the riding pants. Anyone who's ever had a decent size object slam into their knee at 80mph will understand at least one reason I always wear them on the highway.
 

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I also go out on my dinner break..tonite i almost didnt put on any gear before going out because of the hassle...but i figured with my luck..the one time i dont wear it will be the one time i go down or someone puts me down so im forcing my self to wear full gear every single time i ride...i figure ill get faster putting it on and taking it off over time and get used to doing it so it doesnt bother me as much
Welcome to the real world!

Don't let the ATGATT mantra put you on a guilt trip about not getting togged up. Sure gear gives some protection in the event of an accident, but for a motorcycle to be a practical form of transport you have to be a bit pragmatic in your approach to gear........... and the way you ride.

Obviously a motorcycle racer is in a situation where there is a high risk of a of an accident at high speed. Racers are taking their bike to the limit. They take risks and slide their knees as they corner but they do not have the risk of collision with a ton or two of steel. Most accidents result in skidding along the track. Racers dress with that in mind.

Weekend scratchers who like to explore the performance of their machine through twisties should expect an off. Appropriate gear, not much different from what a racer wears is a good idea. It will help if they drop their bike, but they can still expect to break a bone if they smash into Farmer Brown driving his pick-up or tractor.

Highway travel involves relatively high speed, and sometimes quite long journeys, but only the rash take their bikes to the limit of performance and handling. Motorcyclists need comfortable gear to protect against the elements, that also offers some protection in the case of an accident.

And so I could go on. There is gear appropriate to different riding conditions, and different levels of risk.

For many, probably most, motorcyclists in The West motorcycling is a hobby or a lifestyle choice. For some it is practical transport, but even then there is often a Chevy Suburban or something in the garage too. It is different for many of the "international members of the forum", as someone somewhat patronisingly described us.

Where I live now motorcycles are a practical form of everyday transport for the masses. There are over 250,000, mostly small machines, registered in Phuket compared to a bit over 70,000 cars. Most motorcycle journeys are quite short, and speeds seldom exceed 70 km/h (45 mph) mostly a lot less, albeit in fairly indisciplined traffic. The climate is hot, with daytime temperature usually well over 30C° (86Fº). Gear usually extends to an open face helmet (and often not even that). Pulling on a heap of clobber is not practical.

For me here, it is just a helmet and sturdy sandals. At home in NZ, on the road, I throw on a leather jacket and mittens, boots of some description and an open face helmet, but that is usually back roads, not highways. I seldom exceed 90 km/h (55 mph).

There are the daredevils who think they are bulletproof, many of whom do become statistics (which are high). However most here in Phuket realise that they are vulnerable, so ride fairly cautiously. They accept the odd graze, and that there is some risk of a more serious accident, but frankly among the people I work with it is rare.

I am not saying that accidents happen to others; they can happen to anyone, but it is true that some people have more than others..... ever stopped to think why?

Therein lies my point. It is all about risk management. Gear is the last line of defence if it does all go wrong. On the road, ride well within your own, and your bike's limits, and be well aware of what is going on around you, and you can minimise the risk.

Yes, I know that many motorcycle accidents are caused by others, but by being aware you can avoid many of those.

All The Gear All The Time is fine sounding nonsense.

When motorcycles are used as practical transport a more pragmatic approach is needed. Wear appropriate gear for the situation.
 

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For me..I know in an accident that bones can still break..internal organs still get damaged...what i gear up for is so that i still have all the skin i got on my bike with and its not sanded down to the bone in places while im on the way to the hospital.....after watching motorcycle accidents on youtube....most of them came out of nowhere...Patch of gravel..idiot pulls out in front of you ect ect..

gearing up is a choice...choose to or dont choose to..its up to you..just dont call me out as an example of what not to do simply because I dont make the same decisions you do in your personal life
 

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For me..I know in an accident that bones can still break..internal organs still get damaged...what i gear up for is so that i still have all the skin i got on my bike with and its not sanded down to the bone in places while im on the way to the hospital.....after watching motorcycle accidents on youtube....most of them came out of nowhere...Patch of gravel..idiot pulls out in front of you ect ect..

gearing up is a choice...choose to or dont choose to..its up to you..just dont call me out as an example of what not to do simply because I dont make the same decisions you do in your personal life
I go about 80% geared up 100% of the time. I don't do riding pants right now but I'll probably pick some up soon. The only reason I don't wear them is the cost an convenience factors. I ride to work almost every day and I hate the idea of having to change at the office.

That said, I'll still probably breakdown and start wearing them soon anyway. I like my skin how it is. :)
 

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For me..I know in an accident that bones can still break..internal organs still get damaged...what i gear up for is so that i still have all the skin i got on my bike with and its not sanded down to the bone in places while im on the way to the hospital.....after watching motorcycle accidents on youtube....most of them came out of nowhere...Patch of gravel..idiot pulls out in front of you ect ect..

gearing up is a choice...choose to or dont choose to..its up to you..just dont call me out as an example of what not to do simply because I dont make the same decisions you do in your personal life
Most accidents don't come out of nowhere; they happen as a result of inattention. There is a thread on the most dangerous thing out there..... I suggest that is the rider him or herself not being aware of what other idiots might be going to do.

Patches of gravel, idiots pulling out..... plenty of that and more on Phuket's mean roads, where you cannot relax for a second. If you are riding well within your limits, keep space between yourself and others on the road, watch their subtle behaviour, look out for potholes, oil, gravel and all the rest, even when the more or less unexpected occurs there should time to react.

If you want to go on a guilt trip about almost not following the ATGATT mantra, thats fine by me.
 

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listen up man..i honestly don't know how you think that me ALMOST not putting on my riding pants to get something to eat one time has a single thing to do with you going on some looney bin left wing psychobabble anti gear rant..much less me being on a guilt trip....on the contrary...my trip is you using me as an example of people who just put on gear instead of just being more attentive to our surroundings..hence better riders who dont need gear-maybe in a perfect world..but to err is human nature. thats why there are thousands of accidents of all types all across the globe every single hour...and being a super expert professional motorcycle rider that you apparently think you are will still not save anyones a$$ when that dogs jumps out from behind a bush from 5 feet away or or there is 3 cubic yards of gravel from someones driveway in your lane in a sharp corner and theres oncoming traffic...getting the picture?...
maybe a professional expert like you can dodge fate in any unforeseen circumstance that pops up unexpectedly and maybe the rest of us can too..but as long as there is that small chance that no matter how attentive you are an accident that cant be avoided might occur...and i would rather be MORE protected than what tank tops and flipflops have to offer....or maybe your just so anti gear..it eats you up inside just reading that I CHOOSE to wear gear everytime i ride.
There was another proffesional expert rider one time in california who was so anti helmet law..he used his celebrity to voice his opinion about it every chance he got...till he had an unforeseen accident one day on his motorcycle and landed on his face...Today, That person/actor Gary Busy with a crooked face is understandably pro helmet now..
Guilt trip?...no way...my conscience is clear dude..
 

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I commute almost every day and wear Xelememt armored pants and jacket. For shorter errands, less protection.
After breaking my elbow in a previous crash I worry about protecting my joints. I have strapon kneepads I can put on and off in seconds over jeans or other normal pants.
For the hottest months I have armored mesh jacket and pants (Honda brand)
 

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listen up man..i honestly don't know how you think that me ALMOST not putting on my riding pants to get something to eat one time has a single thing to do with you going on some looney bin left wing psychobabble anti gear rant..much less me being on a guilt trip....on the contrary...my trip is you using me as an example of people who just put on gear instead of just being more attentive to our surroundings..hence better riders who dont need gear-maybe in a perfect world..but to err is human nature. thats why there are thousands of accidents of all types all across the globe every single hour...and being a super expert professional motorcycle rider that you apparently think you are will still not save anyones a$$ when that dogs jumps out from behind a bush from 5 feet away or or there is 3 cubic yards of gravel from someones driveway in your lane in a sharp corner and theres oncoming traffic...getting the picture?...
maybe a professional expert like you can dodge fate in any unforeseen circumstance that pops up unexpectedly and maybe the rest of us can too..but as long as there is that small chance that no matter how attentive you are an accident that cant be avoided might occur...and i would rather be MORE protected than what tank tops and flipflops have to offer....or maybe your just so anti gear..it eats you up inside just reading that I CHOOSE to wear gear everytime i ride.
There was another proffesional expert rider one time in california who was so anti helmet law..he used his celebrity to voice his opinion about it every chance he got...till he had an unforeseen accident one day on his motorcycle and landed on his face...Today, That person/actor Gary Busy with a crooked face is understandably pro helmet now..
Guilt trip?...no way...my conscience is clear dude..
Just add him to your ignore list spdklls. That's what I did after reading his sorry excuse for a post.
Apparently everyone should have Multiple Universe ESP, like Michael does, when they ride. :rolleyes:

 

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I don't know where you work. But I am required to wear steel toed boots, and jeans. I figure the boots will hold up fine in an accident. I found a pair of Riding pants that look easy to take off and on(zipper on the side) which go over top of jeans, however, I can't afford them as of yet. They are made by Aerostich. For now, I wear my work jeans and boots.
 

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I am doing just that...thanks for the tip RVOKNIO.
And steel toe boots or any ankle high boot will be just fine Garcia20Fast...its your ankles your looking to protect..they have one of the most complex bone structures in your body and are more complicated to fix and heal.
My cordura riding pants also slip on over my jeans/shorts..usually ordering 1 size bigger than what you normally wear does the trick..got em for under $100 on Ebay...but they are waterproof and only have 2 small vents at each cheek.. I would love to have a pair of mesh ones in this heat...but not paying 2-300 dollars for a pair
 

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I've been looking at Bohn Bodyguard Adventure Pants with Tailbone Pad. $172 shipped.
They also have mesh & shorts versions.

Much cheaper than Darien pants and I like the fact that the pads are held right against the area they are meant to protect instead of being a part of the overpants. I've never found a pair of overpants that didn't feel bulky and make me wonder just where the pads were going to shift to if I hit the roadway. I can live with bulky raingear but not my everyday riding gear.


 
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