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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Greetings, all!
I have long taken an interest in the 2007-2010 generation of Honda's CBR-125r, and I may finally be in a position to purchase one for myself.


A history-
These small-but-capable bikes were not offered by Honda in the USA, we assume on the presumption they wouldn't be wanted. For the most part, the US doesn't have graduated motorcycle licensing, which is what seems to drive the market for limited-displacement road machines. Canada does that licensing scheme, and thus Honda started selling the CBR125 models to the lucky Canucks in 2007.

I can't really explain about the more recent US popularity of the limited-displacement Honda Grom minibike, and its variants or imitators. So let's leave that sidetrack alone, for now. This post is about the CBR125r.

"Canada?!" I said to myself, way back then. "That's right next door, here in New York State. I can just go buy a baby-CBR there, and for wicked cheap too!" Unfortunately not. Bringing one in from Canada (whether new or used) has not turned out to be the easy (or even rational) process many folks like me would hope for.


But sometimes...-
That said, every so often, a second-hand CBR-125 will show up for sale on eBay or in the classifieds, already titled here in the states. Those sellers are always prohibitively far away from me, but the motorcycle for sale is consistently street-legal and ready to ride

Cheers to you folks who get the tasking done, and then make these rides available to the next owner! The complicated part is then taken care of; I just need to have the resources to bring it home, on top of the purchase price.

I have let two of those available bikes pass in just the last year, for my still being too poor to seize the opportunity when it presented. In those cases, I wrote the sellers to offer my sincere compliments, and wish them well on the sale; heartbroken that I couldn't propose to be their buyer.


Opportunity/dilemma-
I have now found one of these rare learner-sportbikes for sale in Florida, and I may have enough dollars saved to both buy the thing _and_ go get it. But wait, there's a catch! Because there had to be a catch.

This particular one is _not_ yet titled here in the US. It is owned by a Canadian citizen living in Florida, and wishing to sell, but not finding any takers for a street motorcycle which he doesn't have a US title on. He is moving home in the coming weeks, and will reluctantly haul the machine back if no one bites.


What to do about it-
My home state is very strict about adhering to the Federal process for registering a foreign motorcycle, already described above as a non-starter. Thus, I could not make one of these baby CBRs street-legal on my own; I will need to buy such a thing already US-registered from a more pragmatic location. A location like some of the counties of the seller's state of Florida, for example.

Choices:
A.) Let this one go, permit the US-market to be deprived of one of these bikes _already_here_, and hope another affordable and nearly-new 11 year-old example happens my way soon? This is not a completely crazy option; fresh opportunities do come along, sometimes.
B.) Stop wanting what I want?
C.) See if I can help this guy get the thing state-titled, and able to be purchased as more than a parts bike? This may cost me bother & money, and then still not work out.

I choose option C, even if my efforts turn out not to be successful. So...


The journey of a thousand miles-
...(or nearly 3000, in this case) begins with the first step. Here is my mandatory initial public post on cbr250.net, so that I may afterward send a private message to one of the forum members.

Believe it or not, one of your members here described his quietly victorious experience with this titling matter, some time ago on the now-defunct hondacbr125r.com forums. Perhaps he can help me to make this happen.

Wish me luck!
-seeking!
 

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I'm not sure what sort of ergonomics you are after, but, the 125 cc Super Cub should be available in the USA shortly.
 

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Titling & registration issues aside, something else worth considering is that you'll never be able to order OEM parts for that CBR125R from a US Honda dealer.

Save yourself all the headaches, find a nice clean CBR250R and don't look back.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Get something else-
...the 125 cc Super Cub should be available in the USA shortly...
...find a nice clean CBR250R and don't look back...
Heh. You guys each made your own pitch for my "option B: Stop wanting what I want."

Thank you both for the info and suggestions, jsonder and MotoMike. The CBR-250r and SuperCub are just not the machines I'm after. Even if we leave out a comparison of technical merits, or that of the ride experience, there remains the driving matter of preference.

You probably have your own example of reading about a particular model, or riding a friend's chosen motorcycle, and not being emotionally moved. Surely, we can all relate to the feeling of, "I bet that's a fine bike. I just don't want it for myself."

My heart lay with the CBR-125, and then only the particular generation therein. For those folks (quite reasonably) not familiar with this lowest man in Honda's sportbike-fashioned lineup, here are a couple of links to start you off.
Bennetts.co.uk
Wikipedia


USA parts availability-
...you'll never be able to order OEM parts for that CBR125R from a US Honda dealer...
Reading on the hondacbr125r.com forums, when that was still around, at least one of the stateside bike owners described coordinating his local shop with a dealer in Canada. If his mechanic would do the work of figuring out which item on the bike needed renewing, the Canadian dealer could nail down a part number and ship it out.

I cannot walk in to Honda in the US, and pick up new fairings for a motorcycle which was never sold here; this is for sure. But if I can build a fair rapport with my nearby shop, and plan ahead for purchases, maybe there won't be so much headache as you fear.

Aside from that method, we are all living in the internet age here, and may be able to order parts directly from an online retailer. The British Columbia, Canada-based cbr125world.com sells a number of maintenance (and/or performance-improving) items for this machine, and ships worldwide. Just one example.

I don't speak from experience on this parts matter, however. Whether MotoMike or other forum members, have you lived the USA spares difficulty for these watercooled 125cc bikes?
-seeking!
 

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I've spent most of my working life in the power sports industry, both at the factory and dealership level... you cannot order OEM parts through US dealers for bikes that were never imported here. OEM parts for those bikes simply do not exist in the distributors parts systems.

Not saying you can't possibly get OEM parts for a CBR125R through a Canadian Honda dealer, I'm sure you likely can. Question is at what cost... not just the price of a given part, but availability, lead time, shipping & customs duties, taxes etc.

Also keep in mind that after a particular model is discontinued, eventually OEM parts availability dries up as well. OEM's don't keep making parts forever. For example, I have a 2001 Honda XR400R, and there are now quite a few OEM parts that are NLA (No Longer Available) for that bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Foul play?-
...you cannot order OEM parts through US dealers for bikes that were never imported here...
Hey, that's cheating. I said that.
...I cannot walk in to Honda in the US, and pick up new fairings for a motorcycle which was never sold here; this is for sure...

Impact on ownership expense-
...Not saying you can't possibly get OEM parts for a CBR125R through a Canadian Honda dealer, I'm sure you likely can. Question is at what cost... not just the price of a given part, but availability, lead time, shipping & customs duties, taxes etc.

Also keep in mind that after a particular model is discontinued, eventually OEM parts availability dries up as well. OEM's don't keep making parts forever...
Your whole post is a fair criticism, MotoMike. I should expect that maintenance and repairs will involve more money and logistics than your average small-displacement bike which sees in-production US dealer support. The _hope_ is my ownership-difficulty will still remain lower than with a stateside 600-class sportbike, or versus anything Italian branded (MotoGuzzi, Ducati, Beta).

The context is valuable here, as motorcycles in Canada and the United States are typically a luxury item rather than a transportation necessity. I anticipate the challenge and expense appropriate to an "unusual" motorcycle, just not that of an "exotic" one.

Are there any USA CBR-125r owners reading here, past or present, who would care to confirm/deny this premise? The resource of all those hondacbr125r.com forum posts is now lost, and my memory of investigating the above idea there has become fuzzy. Please comment on the cost or frustrations you have experienced!


Perspective-
...For example, I have a 2001 Honda XR400R, and there are now quite a few OEM parts that are NLA (No Longer Available) for that bike...
In the face of this NLA situation with some items for your XR400R, do you now wish you hadn't purchased the machine to start with?
-seeking!
 

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It sounds like an impractical purchase because of the difficulty of ordering parts in USA. Maybe consider a Kymco K-Pipe.

I dont know why anyone would want a 125cc, its lack of speed and torque make it DANGEROUS on the street (A car could run you down) and you cant take it on the Motorway.

If i did not care about going on the Motorway I would just buy a scooter
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Maybe not that bad?-
...It sounds like an impractical purchase because of the difficulty of ordering parts in USA...
I will be the first to acknowledge (and I literally was, in this thread) that I can not purchase CBR125-specific parts as cash-and-carry, at any moto shop in this entire country, whether dealer or independent. I have found out over the years that almost all have never even heard of the bike, before.

However, I dispute the assertion that parts would be difficult for me to _order_. I would just be responsible for that myself, with this machine. We already have the one easy web-based example, and I also described reading the scenario where a US owner got help from a friendly Canadian Honda dealership.

Further: Tires, chains, air filters, oil, coolant, brake fluid, brake lines, fuel lines, fuel filters, spark plugs, wheel bearings, light bulbs, and handlebar grips are all reported as easy to keep up on, using aftermarket US-sources; the same as you can do with almost _any_ motorcycle.

For this model's bespoke bits, international shipping will cost money after the price of any part itself. But this is how the whole world worked before Amazon.com's free p&p pricing model, and we still got by. The CBR's 125cc engine is not a 2-stroke design, and isn't spec'd for a rebuild at 3.5 usage-hours; so maybe I won't have to sweat that kind of order very frequently.

It would be swell to hear an actual stateside CBR-125 owner's perspective on this though, rather than have me trying to convey forward what I have merely read on the subject. Perhaps someone will chime in.


That's okay-
...Maybe consider a Kymco K-Pipe.

I dont know why anyone would want a 125cc, its lack of speed and torque make it DANGEROUS on the street (A car could run you down) and you cant take it on the Motorway.

If i did not care about going on the Motorway I would just buy a scooter...
Any motorcycle (or scooter) will have jobs it's good at, and those it isn't. I would not begrudge you your preference.

And if I am successful at acquiring a streetable example of the CBR-125r, whenever that works out, I will not force you to ride it. However, I would offer, if you wanted to test your assumptions. What is your region of the country, Radha21?


Still seeking-
My prospective Canada-Florida bike still does not qualify as an above-mentioned streetable unit, yet. No change since my original post. I continue to work toward connecting with the particular cbr250.net forum member I know about, who has been through the CBR125r US-registration experience.
-seeking!
 

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Maybe not that bad?-


I will be the first to acknowledge (and I literally was, in this thread) that I can not purchase CBR125-specific parts as cash-and-carry, at any moto shop in this entire country, whether dealer or independent. I have found out over the years that almost all have never even heard of the bike, before.

However, I dispute the assertion that parts would be difficult for me to _order_. I would just be responsible for that myself, with this machine. We already have the one easy web-based example, and I also described reading the scenario where a US owner got help from a friendly Canadian Honda dealership.

Further: Tires, chains, air filters, oil, coolant, brake fluid, brake lines, fuel lines, fuel filters, spark plugs, wheel bearings, light bulbs, and handlebar grips are all reported as easy to keep up on, using aftermarket US-sources; the same as you can do with almost _any_ motorcycle.

For this model's bespoke bits, international shipping will cost money after the price of any part itself. But this is how the whole world worked before Amazon.com's free p&p pricing model, and we still got by. The CBR's 125cc engine is not a 2-stroke design, and isn't spec'd for a rebuild at 3.5 usage-hours; so maybe I won't have to sweat that kind of order very frequently.

It would be swell to hear an actual stateside CBR-125 owner's perspective on this though, rather than have me trying to convey forward what I have merely read on the subject. Perhaps someone will chime in.


That's okay-


Any motorcycle (or scooter) will have jobs it's good at, and those it isn't. I would not begrudge you your preference.

And if I am successful at acquiring a streetable example of the CBR-125r, whenever that works out, I will not force you to ride it. However, I would offer, if you wanted to test your assumptions. What is your region of the country, Radha21?


Still seeking-
My prospective Canada-Florida bike still does not qualify as an above-mentioned streetable unit, yet. No change since my original post. I continue to work toward connecting with the particular cbr250.net forum member I know about, who has been through the CBR125r US-registration experience.
-seeking!
Hi,

Please dont take my advice the wrong way, I am not criticizing you. Just wanted to make sure you see the pros and cons and all points of view so that you can make the most informed decision.

If you are a collector or an enthusiast than by all means go ahead and buy it. I was just pointing out that it has many pitfalls to use such a bike as a "daily driver" and I made a mistake when I was younger and bought a Saab and then when I needed to replace parts it was extremely expensive and I ended up regretting that I bought the Saab in the first place.

By all means, follow your heart and nobody knows your situation better than you yourself knows. I just was offering my own personal opinion about it.

I can tell you for myself that the only reason I own a motorcycle AT ALL is because I want to go on the highway at 70 or 80 mph. But If I had resigned myself to only driving on city streets I would just get a 125cc scooter. Ive owned both motorcycles and scooters and I can see the pros and cons of each.
 

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... In the face of this NLA situation with some items for your XR400R, do you now wish you hadn't purchased the machine to start with?
-seeking!
Not at all. The kinds of OEM parts that are now listed as NLA for my 01' XR400R are for the most part major items I'm not likely to ever need... complete fork assembles, rear gas shock, fuel tank, swing arm, seat assembly, etc. Whereas other OEM hard parts, like engine gaskets & oil seals, pistons & ring sets for example, are readily available and will be for the foreseeable future. Point being that for any of those OEM "keep it running" parts, I can easily and quickly order them from any US Honda dealer.
 
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