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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi, I'm new here! (newly registered but I've been here for countless times.)

Some of my final concerns:

1. How much did you pay for your CBR 250(ABS) if you don't mind me asking? I need total price, in order to judge among sales people. Is it below the MSRP or above it?

2. Emergency Stops. I've never touched a motorcycle although I know it's gonna be my thing. I'm an intermediate MTB rider and I know two wheels don't do as good as four wheels at braking. But how does motorcycle compares with bicycle at this point? Are emergency stops always deadly or does it depend on your skill level?

3. ABS or not? How does the ABS version compare to the regular one? I ride (MTB) and drive aggressively (for exercise and fun :D) while treating other traffics well, I have to have good brakes. (my brakes worth as much as my bike...proved it's a good upgrade)
If the ABS feature is proved to be a big bonus, then I can't wait to love it.

4. Split Lane illegal in Ohio? I've never seen a rider did that here, but I've done it so many times on my MTB in front of cops...:confused:

Don't answer all if you don't want to, tho I appreciate any inputs!

I'm looking forward to become a *real* member in the coming month or two. A big thank you to this community, people seem very nice here!:p
 

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Reports suggest that ABS can certainly help in some situations, but ultimately attitude and how you ride will have more bearing on your safety than technology.

After 43 years of riding on the road I would say that being aware, and finding a way to avoid the danger, is more important than an emergency stop (but do still practice doing the latter from time to time, ABS or not). I cannot recall the last time I had to pull up quickly; it must have been in my formative years. Swerving to avoid things is the norm on Phuket's mean streets.

Keep your aggressive riding to your MTB, and off road, but take it easy on the road, and you should be fine. That's what I do (I also cycle a lot), and it has kept me out of trouble for a many years. The last time I was involved in a collision it came from behind, and had nothing to do with braking. Not my fault, but if I had been more aware of what was going on around me I could have avoided it.

Be aware of what you want to avoid, but look where you want to go.

Oh, and some think that I am not very nice.

Well, I don't have much time for pistol packin' squid wannabes who think they can buy their way into becoming bikers with a brand new nancy boy bike..... then start complaining that there is something wrong with their machine, but really it is because they know nowt, but are too proud to admit it.

Coming from a MTB background, you will already have some useful skills on two wheels.
 

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$4197 + license and registration for the ABS model at Southern Honda Powersports. Best deal in the country. I drove from Illinois (468 mi) because my local dealers wouldn't budge from $5500. They'll ship the paperwork if you pay cash, but I decided to finance. They gave me $100 travel credit toward any accessories for driving.

The ABS is not a necessity, but it won't hurt to have an extra measure of safety as a first time rider. I went with ABS to try it out on the cheapest bike possible, and I'm happy with my decision. It feels different than a normal system, especially since the "combined ABS" simulates manual modulation.

Sent from my DROID2 GLOBAL using Motorcycle.com App
 

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In my opinion, if you can afford ABS, why not get it, but learn everything you can about riding and consider that task a lifelong process. Your questions about braking will be answered if you take the MSF course (which is, as my friend from Rhinelander stated, more important than ABS).

Lane splitting is expressly illegal in 49 states and pretty stupid in all 50.
 

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I was deadset on getting ABS. Then I started talking to my friends and they told me that since I've never ridden before, I wouldn't know the difference between having ABS and not having it. I also wanted to save the $500 that it would've cost with it. And the fact that I'm taking an MSF course would help me with panic stopping/emergency braking etc. I was an idiot and ended up buying the 4 year warranty. And my dealer had a ridiculous doc fee, and the taxes etc. So I ended up paying....$5900. I know. I know. I'm an idiot. But I wanted the bike. It was 4199 sticker and after the 800 warranty and the other bs fees that's how much I paid. I should prob be punched in the face. But at least the Hubs bought it for me. lol. Oh yeah. Hubs was worried about me getting the ABS b/c he said when I eventually want to move up to a 600, he was worried I'd be too dependent on having the ABS and be used to it. Said it'd be better if I learned w/o so I wouldn't be missing anything down the road.
 

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The ABS question is answered SUPER simply: IF you can afford it get it, it's worth the $500. IF you can't afford it, then don't get it, the bike is worth it without it, too. Either way, you had best learn to control your bike while braking or you could wind up typing on this blog using an blow tube.
 

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Without.

Next question.
 

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Sorry, but just saying "without" is inane. I have two non-abs bikes and bought them because I got WAY more than $500.00 off each and I needed that margin to afford the bikes at all. Aside from just the ABS itself, the CBR with ABS also has linked braking. The CBR without ABS does not have linked braking.

Again, it's a matter of affording it or not. The bike is clearly better with ABS than without and to imply otherwise to someone new and considering the options is misleading. If someone wants to buy a bike without ABS, that's their choice. But they shouldn't be implying that non-ABS is actually better than ABS. It's not.
 

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^ How is it insane? or inane? Most bikes don't have ABS.
 

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Learn the skills of stopping your bike (speed, position, breaking, decision making) and you will carry it over to every bike; most bikes do not have ABS. If you learn to depend on ABS you will lock the front wheel, wobble, and eat **** due to inexperience on another bike. Use your $500 on gear/MSF and you'll be way more safe. Also, if you ever want to upgrade in the future to a full sports bike, or do canyon runs, track days etc., abs/linked breaks is bad news.
 

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I bought mine WITH ABS.
I believe over the next 5 years or so most bikes will have ABS and some countries will make it compulsory.
 

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^ How is it insane? or inane? Most bikes don't have ABS.
Not "insane", but "inane". (silly or nonsensical). And I didn't say that not having ABS is inane. I said that a one word answer of "without" is inane because a new rider may infer that the non-ABS bike is actually better when it's not. The best a non-ABS supporter can come up with is that being a highly skilled rider SHOULD eliminate the need for ABS. This may be true, but that argument doesn't automatically make the non-ABS bike the right choce as saying "without" may imply. The OP may decide that the ABS isn't worth the $500 or can't afford it, but that doesn't mean that his bike is better without it.
 

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I bought mine with ABS

Read this..

Braking for Motorcyclists <<= Click!!

" What do you think about antilock brakes?
Quite a few of my students are confused about what exactly antilock brakes do. A comment I've heard several times is "If I want the brakes pumped, I'll do it myself." That's a serious misunderstanding of what antilock brakes do. In fact, you don't want the brakes pumped. You want them applied as hard as possible, just short of the point where the tires begin to slide. That's where you get the greatest deceleration. The problem is that we humans have a hard time keeping the brakes at that point. The front tire, where nearly all of the braking power is, will slide if we brake too hard, requiring instant and dramatic action (namely, release of the brake) to prevent a fall. Many times we fail to react quickly enough, and crash. Or, fearing a fall, we don't apply the brakes hard enough and thus sacrifice some of our stopping distance.

Antilock brakes will not activate unless the rider makes the mistake of applying the brakes hard enough to lock a wheel. But if that happens, the machinery reacts more quickly than we can, releasing the pressure on the brakes to resume rolling and prevent a fall, followed more quickly than we can by reapplying the brakes to resume the stop.

The word from the experts at the motorcycle magazines, the people who do the 60-to-zero braking tests, is that under test conditions, they can outperform antilock brakes. That is, if their skills are already highly-developed, and if they have three or four tries to get tuned up, and if they know exactly when they're going to start braking, and if there are no traction surprises (like going over a sandy or painted patch of pavement), then they can outperform the machinery. But under real-world conditions, they say that antilock brakes win.

That's good enough endorsement for me. Furthermore, my guess is that over the next few years even test conditions won't be enough to outperform antilock brakes. Neither of my motorcycles has antilock brakes. My next motorcycle will have them. "
 

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There are several threads on here with extensive discussion on ABS. Search for "ABS".

My bike does not have it. In my last "panic" stop I was courting a stoppie, so I don't think i need it. However, several people whose opinions I respect think highly of it, especially for new riders, so I'll stop there, except to say:

Your survival on the street depends on knowing the limits of your bike and how to stay within them, or exploit them, depending on the circumstances. ABS is not, in my opinion, an acceptable substitute for learning how to stop your bike quickly and efficiently in a crisis. In fact, most manufacturers (Honda included) will bluntly tell you that ABS will not stop the bike as quickly as a skilled application of the brakes. Learn how to skillfully apply your brakes and let ABS (if you have it) be that insurance policy that you never have to use.

As always, my opinion.

Luke
 

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^ agreed. As Auffit said someplace: ABS improves the bike not the rider.
 

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Back in the day, many people argued against first against seat belts and then against airbags in cars, saying ridiculous things like, "I prefer to be thrown clear of the accident."

The Motorcycle ABS discussion is at a similar point right now. The data is clear (though there will always be people who aren't swayed by data):

The most-valuable motorcycle feature: antilock brakes

The bottom line is that if you can buy it, absolutely buy it. And whether your bike has it or doesn't have it, practice emergency stops regularly.
 

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I agree with Luke. I was worried about money b/c we were buying two bikes at once and had to buy gear for two. I wanted ABS but was trying to save money. Also they couldn't find a black ABS within surrounding states. It's nice to have but if you just can't swing the extra 500 it's not the end of the world. But def take the MSF. Hubs wrecked and flipped over his CBR600 b/c he panic stopped.
:(
 
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