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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, so we all know that the paint code for the orange used on the CBR250R Repsol models is YR-271.

I don't know about the rest of the world, but here in the States, it seems to be impossible to get mixed locally. No one I've spoken to can do anything with that color.

I went down to my local automotive paint supply, and we broke out the paint chips, and found a match. It's (wait for it) Repsol Orange... Peugeot paint code KHE.

I'll be spraying the rear seat cowl soon, and I'll do my best to post results.

I hope someone finds this helpful.

Good luck!
 

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You can also get it here: Honda YR271 Nitric Orange

The ColorRite paint prices seem expensive... $90 for half a pint, but then I haven't bought automotive paint in a long time. How do those ColorRite prices compare to what your local auto paint supplier charges for the Peugeot Repsol Orange?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Half a pint was just under $20.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Small update:

Strip oe finish from parts to be painted.

Evidently the paint isn't compatible with the factory clear.

After the tack coat, I shot a somewhat wet coat.

The clear underneath began to shrivel. I'm currently waiting on my buddy's wife to get back with a large can of lacquer thinner.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Here is the formula for anyone who might find it helpful.

 

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Most OEM clears can handle refinishing without stripping, but apparently not the CBR.

Because it's listed as a "basecoat", I would say you will need to clear it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Most OEM clears can handle refinishing without stripping, but apparently not the CBR.

Because it's listed as a "basecoat", I would say you will need to clear it.
Yeah, I have the clear, but didn't get that far.

I may have put the base on a little too wet, but I should have tested the surface with a little lacquer thinner first.

This is what it looked like:

 

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That did really blow up!

Not very common with today's OEM finishes, but you have no choice but to strip and prime.

Bummer. A lot more work.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, here it is with several coats of SEM flexible primer. I won't get a chance to wet sand it today, but it may be orange by the end of the weekend.



Hopefully the orange will cover the gray primer better than the black finish that was on it. I did not realize how translucent the paint was going to be. I just hope it matches the Honda tri-coat.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Here are a few more pics:









I don't think the results will be as good as I was expecting. I've got to wait for some sunlight, but it appears that the finish came out yellower than the factory finish on my bike.

I may have needed to spray a few more coats, or have started with a different color primer.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Yeah, the color is waaay off. It doesn't even look like the color in the can or the chip I compared it to. I'm thinking that gray primer wasn't the way to go.

Color Rite's tri-coat uses a white base, and that may be what I needed to do.





 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)


For whatever reason, it looks better in pictures, here is a better representation, the final product looks like the can on the right, where as the rest of the bike is the center or left can.

 

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Yup, correct base coat is everything when it come to getting a good match to the factory color. That said, even professional auto body painters can have difficulty getting a perfect match to factory finishes, particularly with some colors. This is why Honda paints all of it's replacement painted body parts at the same time they paint the body parts used for bike production, so that the new part is as close to matching the original painted parts as possible. Which then explains why when Honda sells out of a particular replacement body part, they become NLA on the parts listings... when they're gone, Honda doesn't make any more.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Looks like the primer color is the culprit. I used a decal backer, and brushed on some of the paint from the can, well, the results speak for themselves.

 

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Dark primer= dark color, light primer= lighter color. Use the same idea when painting model kit parts, thought everyone knew that. Then again I'm ignorant and using 'lumps' of people. Sorry about that, I'll work on it. But try a black primer and you should get pretty close to the original color you're looking for. :D Hope that helps and good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
It's from a CBR300R
 
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