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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
It is mid December in the North Eastern region of the U.S., temperatures are hovering around 40F/ 4C and that can only signify that good old winter is upon us as well as the end of moto-season, or is it? A significant event indeed in moto world, although not quite as dramatic as REM’s “It’s the End of the World as we know it…” but I do “feel fine” about it. I do feel fine about it only because I don’t view this as the end of the moto season, I think of it as a “rest stop” in this journey called sport touring, punctuated by breaks and scenic detours along the way.

This season has been an exciting beginning for me, I found my way back into motorsports after being absent for a decade and was able to check off an item from my bucket list, I finally went on a sport touring trip! No, I did not go as far and as long as had envisioned, nor did I ride an overly expensive steed with excess horsepower. I only managed to ride as far as Indiana (from Maryland), on what most would consider a glorified scooter. However, along the way I rediscovered the joy of riding the open tarmac at highway speeds or just chugging along back roads. I also encountered the challenges and dangers of the sport, bad roads and bad weather tested my stamina and determination, and close calls induced self-doubt. Ultimately, for reasons only my fellow moto-enthusiast can understand, I ‘m still riding!

Tomorrow Scully will go into hibernation; I will miss her. She has been my “Road tripping” ally (RHCP), and during our short interaction it has never let me down, we traversed across a few states, through varied terrain and bad weather, and through it all I was never let down. One man, one machine, 3400 miles/ 5440 km and many more to follow, my 250R has delivered, like a loyal friend always ready for the next adventure, no complaints no hesitations.

During these upcoming times of frigid, gloomy weather while Scully sleeps, I will begin to plot our next moto adventures on the U.S. map that hangs on my wall. The destinations are less relevant then the journey, but the list is ambitious. Maryland to California via Route 50, Yellowstone & Glacier National Park, Bear tooth Highway, Canada and most importantly my “Mecca”: Northern California Redwood Coast, all in due time.

So you see my fellow moto enthusiast, indeed, it’s all dependent on perspective, at least for me winter is a “rest area”, a time in which to re-asses, plan, plot routes and confirm progress. I will refrain from dwelling in the fact that I’m unable to ride, rather, I will rejoice in the fact that I was able to fulfilled my moto ambitions, visited old friends, saw new places and enjoyed my existence on two wheels! I will go through this winter solo, without my road “ally” Scully, but in the end I know that “…it’s always better when we are together…” (J. Johnson). For this reason I will look forward to the spring, when the sun will shine and the tarmac will entice me to follow its endless path, because for me it’s not always about the destination, or about the journey, It's about the Ride. Until then I will dream of “Californication” (RHCP). Enjoy the Ride.

Check out the blog for other posts and pics.
 

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If your doing it right, it's both.
I agree. For my purposes, a worthy destination (ie...a good reason to go) makes the journey worthwhile. If it is more than just an excuse to ride the bike, I get more satisfaction...and reduces the chance of grief from the Mrs.. WIN!!
 

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The great thing about putting the bike away for the winter - is that it feels so f%*$ing good the first time you ride it again after taking it out of storage in the spring. In life you need the bad stuff to make the good stuff feel even better. What is that old Chinese proverb, that you wish upon your worst enemy?......"I hope you get everything you want in life". That would certainly be a miserable existence.

Mike
 

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I think I've always favored the journey over the destination in regards to bikes.
The destination signifies the journey's end which can leave an empty space within one's self, especially if the journey has been epic. This usually requires one to immediately begin a new journey to remedy the situation :)

In a car it is absolutely the destination. The less time sitting in a metal box the better.
 

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I think I've always favored the journey over the destination in regards to bikes.
The destination signifies the journey's end which can leave an empty space within one's self, especially if the journey has been epic. This usually requires one to immediately begin a new journey to remedy the situation :)

In a car it is absolutely the destination. The less time sitting in a metal box the better.
I generally agree. However, I love to take my car on longer road trips too. I revel in the fact that at some point I will be somewhere I've never been before. I enjoy seeing the scenery and topography change too. All from the comfort of my car. I also love getting gas in places like Paducah, KY - and mindfully saying to myself "I can't believe I am actually in Paducah, KY right now filling up my tank"!

My dad has been wintering in Zephyrhills, FL over the past few years. Over the past two years I've visited him over the winter - drove down each time - in two days. Loved every minute of it. I tried to take a different route each time. Loved the Ozarks. Loved driving through the Great Smoky Mountains in Tennessee. Loved chatting with some locals while fueling up in Baton Rouge, LA. A fellow in front of me in line at a Subway restaurant near Richmond, KY had trouble with his bank card. I paid for his meal to help him out. I've rarely seen someone respond with so much genuine appreciation before. Yes - even in a car the journey can be just as important as the destination.

Funny - in Florida I was continually asked by locals if my 2009 Honda Civic Si sedan was a hybrid. I couldn't figure out why so many people thought that I was driving a hybrid model. But time and again I found myself explaining "No - it isn't a hybrid" and then describing the characteristics of the Si model while secretly wondering why they ever thought to ask such a question. At one outdoor carwash, people waiting in line for their cars to be washed spontaneously struck up conversations with me and took out their cell phones to show photos of their family and pets! People don't get any friendlier than that. At this particular carwash, one fellow finally helped me solve this puzzle. After the usual exchange, he asked "Then why do you have an electrical cord hanging through your front grill"? "Umm. That is the cord for my car's block heater. When it is -40C (-40F) outside where I live, you need to plug in your car to heat the engine block - to warm the coolant and oil. Otherwise, you might not be able to start it". :D

Mike
 

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CBR250R, good points, good story.
I concede :)
I have to admit though that the journey is still always better on a bike. I've even entertained the notion of riding my WR250R down to Florida to visit my dad over the winter. Would have to vigilantly follow the weather, take my time, and be ready to stop at a moments notice. It's a pretty crazy idea. But the fact that I am even entertaining this notion is a pretty good testament to how much more enjoyable the journey is on a bike. ;)

Mike
 
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