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Hi new here with a 2013 bike I just bought. Bike fell over and has been causing problems since. The BAS does not seem to be the fault, fuses are good, and we’ve charged the battery. I’ve a headache. Any advice appreciated.
 

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we’ve charged the battery
Bonificus, Welcome to the forum, and thanks for sharing and the video. Excellent video.

Why should I be the bad gay? Dear friend, I think you need a new battery. And I'd love to know I'm wrong.

Immediately after you turning on the starter you have a strong voltage drop. This is typical sine of a dead battery situation. I would say a short, but all your fuses are fine and you have no problem going back and reproducing the fault. So I think it's not a short.

In the past I fell with a new battery, and entered a loop of unnecessary expenses. It's that simple to test a battery. So I suggest you check her out and let us know how she is doing.
For this test you need a voltmeter.
1. Voltage on the battery should be at least 12.7V (less than this requires charging).​
2. Measure voltage on the battery during startup. The voltage should be above 10V (If the battery does not hold 10V it means it is a dead battery).​
3. If the engine starts, check the voltage on the battery terminals again, it should be around 13.9V (if there is less, it means there is a problem with the coils of the generator).​
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bonificus, Welcome to the forum, and thanks for sharing and the video. Excellent video.

Why should I be the bad gay? Dear friend, I think you need a new battery. And I'd love to know I'm wrong.

Immediately after you turning on the starter you have a strong voltage drop. This is typical sine of a dead battery situation. I would say a short, but all your fuses are fine and you have no problem going back and reproducing the fault. So I think it's not a short.

In the past I fell with a new battery, and entered a loop of unnecessary expenses. It's that simple to test a battery. So I suggest you check her out and let us know how she is doing.
For this test you need a voltmeter.
1. Voltage on the battery should be at least 12.7V (less than this requires charging).​
2. Measure voltage on the battery during startup. The voltage should be above 10V (If the battery does not hold 10V it means it is a dead battery).​
3. If the engine starts, check the voltage on the battery terminals again, it should be around 13.9V (if there is less, it means there is a problem with the coils of the generator).​
I checked it out and when the starter is pressed it drops to 6.3 V, I believe the battery is under warranty so I’ll replace it today. There may be another problem as the bike died while I was driving, and the battery status shouldn’t have affected that no? I’ll keep you updated after I replace the battery. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I checked it out and when the starter is pressed it drops to 6.3 V, I believe the battery is under warranty so I’ll replace it today. There may be another problem as the bike died while I was driving, and the battery status shouldn’t have affected that no? I’ll keep you updated after I replace the battery. Thanks
Well I replaced the battery and the problem persists
 

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There may be another problem as the bike died while I was driving,
I'm guessing your battery was destroyed by a charging system that stopped charging. You can check if there a short on the coils, but sometimes there is no measurable short, and the coils are not normal, and the generator does not provide a high enough voltage to allow normal charging. If the battery is destroyed as a result of a previous failure in the charging system, I'm not sure it's under warranty. It's really annoying, but it could happens sometimes.

It is very easy to tell if the charging system is not good, but in the CBR we don't have a warning light or gauge that shows the voltage on the battery (when the voltage on the battery terminals, while the engine is running, drops below 13.9V, this indicates a problem with the charging system).

I thought about adding such a volt meter in our panel, but there is no place to install it in a way that would be both efficient and beautiful. So now I have a "panel" volt-meter under my seat. But when it's not online, it doesn't have much meaning.
Maybe someone here want to suggest me a better use for that gadget?
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So try to measure a short on the coil wires, but even if you don't find a short, the first thing you measure when the engine starts again is to measure voltage on the battery terminals and it should be around 13.9 volts at idle. If you get a lower value, then you definitely have a problem with the charging system. Sometimes it's a problem with the rectifier. Sometimes the problem is with the coils.
 

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Well I replaced the battery and the problem persists
Please don't check by changing the battery, check ONLY by the voltage level during startup.
If even now you measure a voltage lower than 10V during starting, it means that your replacement battery is also not good, because that's how a battery that is close to dying behaves.

If you measure still below 10V and you do not accept my explanation, you will have to find an alternative explanation. But don't give up. Don't just replace parts if you can't finish the troubleshooting process effectively.
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Can you jump-start it with a car?
Do not use a car battery, it has an amount of current available that can only create new problems.

Yes, good idea...
  • to see what's going on in the starter circuit? It's short? Bad connectors? Problem with The brushs?
  • Or if there is a mechanical jam in the mechanism of the starter? a problem with the bearings? A problem with the one-way clutch?
But I don't think this is the right direction. Everything there worked as it should until the current malfunction. If it was a problem with the starter, it would slowly developing, and not appears at once. The current problem as I understand it is a classic problem of a dead battery due to lack of charging. But maybe I'm wrong.
 

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Do not use a car battery, it has an amount of current available that can only create new problems.
I used to think the same thing, and it's sorta true. 12V in a motorcycle battery is the same as 12V in any other battery, no matter how large or small. You could jump a small vehicle (a 250cc motorcycle) from a larger one (a car), but you wouldn't want to go the other way around. If the vehicle is going to draw more amps than the battery can provide, then that is where you will run into problems.

It's basically the same reason we can run a 1200w Microwave or a 5w phone charger from the same 120v wall outlet (or 240v in other parts of the world).

As I remember...
Voltage is the Pressure on the electrons, Amperage is the Volume of electrons, Ohms is the Resistance of electrons.

Maybe consider jump-starting from a non-running vehicle if it's a concern?

A 3rd alternative is to see if there is a short in the wiring? It's difficult to see with all the black sheathing, but maybe you might see a frayed piece of copper wire shorting out on some exposed metal. It's unlikely if it fell on flat ground, but if it fell on something with edges like a toolbox, I could see that happening.
 

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If the vehicle is going to draw more amps than the battery can provide, then that is where you will run into problems.
Yes AND NOooo
The car's battery can provide a much, much higher current. if there is a problem of a short or a problem of mechanical jamming, in that case a higher current supply (because the battery will give what it has to give), that higher current will cause more damage. And there are other situations where connecting to a car battery can cause damage.
It is simply not recommended, possible, but absolutely not recommended. At the moment it is not an emergency road repair etc.
A 3rd alternative is to see if there is a short in the wiring?
If you short a battery, even a motorcycle battery, the current rises to the levels of arc welding. That's not what Bonificus said: And his fuses are fine.
 
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Wouldn't a 12V battery give the same amount of current no matter if it's a car battery or a motorcycle battery?

Voltage = Current * Resistance

Not voltage = current*type of battery

Or am I missing something crucial?

Edit: Assuming the motorcycle has a 12V battery too of course, which most motorcycles have.
 

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Voltage = Current * Resistance
YES ===>>> Volt/Resistance=Current
According to that formula, in a short time, when the resistance tends to zero, the current tends to infinity. But the battery does not have an infinite current, and in a short state it will give everything it has.
As Sgt.Stupid said, a car battery has about 55Ah
Car battery : 12v 55Ah
CBR250R battery as only 6Ah <<<< 55Ah
A difference of almost 10 times.

In a road repair situation, at emergency repair, you can use a car's battery, only for an emergency, because it may sometimes cause more damage than helpful. Therefore basically it is not recommended.

P.S. And if it's a car battery, the car engine should be turned off, because the alternator of a car also gives a much higher charging current, one that is suitable for a 55Ah battery and not for 6Ah battery (The car's charger destroys the motorcycle's battery)
 

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Each battery also has an additional figure that has not been mentioned until now and is very relevant.
The maximum current that the battery can provide is much higher, ten of time higher or more, than the declared current for continual use.
For example: Our YUASA TYX7L-BS as continuous ability to deliver 6.3Ah AND 100Ah for short time (CCA).
CCA
C
old Cranking Ampere, is the rating used to define a battery's ability to start an engine in cold temperatures.
The starter pulls the maximum current from the battery which is 100Ah (in a normal and good battery).

Our friend's battery does not provide this 100Ah CCA current, and this is what is confusing, and in the past it confused me too, because I wrongly thought that if the lighting works and does not weaken, then the battery is good. But the lighting does not need more than 6Ah. When I learned what should be measured, I stopped being confused:
[Tamir said:]
1. Voltage on the battery should be at least 12.7V (less than this requires charging).​
  • If after charging the battery does not hold 12.7V, it means that the battery is about to die.
2. Measure voltage on the battery during startup. The voltage should be above 10V.​
  • If the battery does not hold 10V during startup it means it is a dead battery.
3. If the engine starts, check the voltage on the battery terminals again, it should be around 13.9V.​
  • if there is less, it means there is a problem with the coils or the rectifier or both.


It's always a pain in the pocket to buy a good new battery😢😢😢, the batteries are one of the most expensive parts of the motorcycle's ongoing maintenance, and it sucks when you come to the conclusion that yours battery is dead, and this is part of the psychological reason why people insist on looking for the problem elsewhere.
 
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Oops....not fun at all...but...
I just bought. Bike fell over and has been causing problems since.
And your conclusion
Turns out it’s a broken crankshaft.
There is no connection between the two events. No way.
I explained to you what tests to do, We found that your have a defective battery, and you failed to convince me that your alternative battery is fine.
Hey; but sir, you don't have to convince me, and I would appreciate it if you could explain to us what was the set of tests that led you to your dramatic conclusion.

If your engine is stuck/stall? There are simple ways to conduct an experiment for this as well.
Open the central CAP in the left engine cover, insert a 17 mm socket and try to turn counter-clockwise.

Maybe you can upload here again some short video of the additional test.
 

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Turns out it’s a broken crankshaft.
Sorry to hear that.

Did you physically see the break or did a mechanic tell you the news? Looks like an engine shipped is about $1,200. Not sure what a broken cbr250r in your neighborhood is worth, but maybe you can get $1000 or so for what you have. Maybe this is fate's way of telling you it's time to upgrade!
 
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