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Discussion Starter #1
My battery has recently been dying on me continuously. A new battery was installed, yet the same issue again.
I started testing with a multi-meter and found the regulator/rectifier to be testing good. I followed the procedures that I found online, as it was my first time doing this.

I figured it had to be the stator, so I ordered one and took the crank case cover off tonight to begin with the install of the new one. Once the crank case was opened and the old stator was removed, I noticed that it shows no visible signs of being faulty. All of the videos and forums that I've searched online always show black or shorted areas on the coils or soldering. My old stator showed no visible signs of any of those symptoms. It looks flawless, visually - on both sides of the coils, soldering points and wiring to the harness. It looks like my new stator in every way. I'm going to go ahead and install the new stator anyway, just for peace of mind, since I already have it.
My question is this: Have any of you had a bad stator that looked good upon visual inspection? My old stator literally looks brand new!


Also, should I use gasket seal on the rubber grommet that feeds the wiring into the crank case, or would you recommend another type of sealant for that area?

This is the first time I've done this type of work on my motorcycle, so any feedback regarding the process is helpful. I want to do this without issue.

Once I get things back together, I hope things will work fine. If not, my plan is to replace the regulator/rectifier (even though it tested good), in hopes of finally solving my charging issues.

Anything else I should consider, if the new stator doesn't work?
 

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There is a process to testing for a bad stator but I don't recall it right now. When the stator on my dad's VFR 800 failed it looked black. As for the rubber grommet, I would say don't use any sealant. There is no engine oil in that area anyways, right?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
There is a process to testing for a bad stator but I don't recall it right now. When the stator on my dad's VFR 800 failed it looked black. As for the rubber grommet, I would say don't use any sealant. There is no engine oil in that area anyways, right?
There's oil in there. It's necessary to drain the oil before removing the crank case cover, in order to access the stator. I'm guessing stators can be faulty without visible signs, on rare occasion.

I found another thread with the same issue: https://www.cbr250.net/forum/cbr250-problems-issues/55921-charging-system-problems-help-please-5.html#post683937

I'll report my findings when I install the new stator and ride the bike again.
 

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Good day,

So recently I also had to replace my stator. Tho I tested the stator before taking it out and it showed that it was only pushing out 3vac, On all three phases.

When you test it make sure you rev the bike to 5000 rpm to see that you get over 35+vac

Also you can test continuity to ground.

Google how to test a stator that's what I did.

Oh and the manual says to use gasket seal on the rubber to make a proper seal.

Good luck.

Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Mufasa. I'll pick up some gasket seal on the way home tonight to finish the stator install. Thats what a person in an online video used when installing a Fireblade stator.
I googled multiple ways to test through these components and am eager to do each test. It's good to acquire more info on this, so thanks. It has been fun to learn and to gain more understanding these processes for the first time.

Good day,

So recently I also had to replace my stator. Tho I tested the stator before taking it out and it showed that it was only pushing out 3vac, On all three phases.

When you test it make sure you rev the bike to 5000 rpm to see that you get over 35+vac

Also you can test continuity to ground.

Google how to test a stator that's what I did.

Oh and the manual says to use gasket seal on the rubber to make a proper seal.

Good luck.

Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
 

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Thanks Mufasa. I'll pick up some gasket seal on the way home tonight to finish the stator install. Thats what a person in an online video used when installing a Fireblade stator.
I googled multiple ways to test through these components and am eager to do each test. It's good to acquire more info on this, so thanks. It has been fun to learn and to gain more understanding these processes for the first time.
Hi Delnorte, no problem. This place has many helpful minds. I'm going to attach a picture of just the install so to help you out.
Ride safe.

Regards


Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I installed the new stator, even though the original stator showed no visible signs of degradation.
Easy install and started riding the bike again. The charging system works like a charm now. Even without any visual signs of fault, the original stator was bad(it did test bad through the process of elimination and direct testing, and the rectifier/regulator tested good, after running through all of the diode tests recommended in online videos, with a multi-meter).
So there you have it... a stator can be bad, even if after visual inspection leaves no indication of faulty signs (mine literally looked brand new with no black or burn marks and showed no signs of fault, outside of multi-meter testing, which eliminated other faulty components).
Hope this helps others who might run across a situation like this. Easy $106.00 fix and an oil drain/change is involved. I gave 24 hours for the gasket seal to set up on the wiring grommet after bolting the crank case back on, an oil fill after that, and it was back to new again.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Update: 11 days after the new stator install the charging system is still working as it should. I've commuted to work every day and did 50 - 70 mile mountain rides each of the last 3 days. Once again, a stator that shows no visible signs of failure can still be faulty. My original stator tested faulty, but looked brand new. Installing the new stator fixed everything and is holding up great. The charging system is operating like new again, and testing with good numbers on the multi-meter as well.

I installed the new stator, even though the original stator showed no visible signs of degradation.
Easy install and started riding the bike again. The charging system works like a charm now. Even without any visual signs of fault, the original stator was bad(it did test bad through the process of elimination and direct testing, and the rectifier/regulator tested good, after running through all of the diode tests recommended in online videos, with a multi-meter).
So there you have it... a stator can be bad, even if after visual inspection leaves no indication of faulty signs (mine literally looked brand new with no black or burn marks and showed no signs of fault, outside of multi-meter testing, which eliminated other faulty components).
Hope this helps others who might run across a situation like this. Easy $106.00 fix and an oil drain/change is involved. I gave 24 hours for the gasket seal to set up on the wiring grommet after bolting the crank case back on, an oil fill after that, and it was back to new again.
 

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Good to hear (read, duh). I'm glad that this fix seems stable.
 
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