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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Folks,
Planning on my first mini-trip in a couple of weeks. I think I know the basics about watching for oil slicks and painted lines and such. However, how do you keep water from running down your neck and coming in through your face shield? Does the 250 windshield keep much of the rain away from you?
Thanks for any comments.
Regards,
George
 

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how do you keep water from running down your neck and coming in through your face shield? Does the 250 windshield keep much of the rain away from you?
Take the car if you dont want to get wet. Think about what you're asking man. If it starts pouring rain and you pull up to a stop is a windshield going to keep you dry? Think about it.

Not trying to be rude so please don't take this reply that way.
 

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rather disjointed post but here goes:

make sure you have somewhere waterproof to store your stuff, its no fun paying for things with wet money. note: not all waterproof jackets actually waterproof the pockets.
Keep further back from the vehicle ahead. it takes longer to stop
standing water may be deeper than it seems i.e its not a small puddle it's massive hole
use the top of your glove to wipe visor clean
carry decent waterproofs in an easy to reach place.
plastic bags inside your boots = water proof
turn your lights up in heavy rain to increase your visability (careful not to blind oncoming driver)
turn your head to one side to let the wind force off water building up on your visor

i wear a gortex 2 piece motorcycle jacket and trousers. i ride all year in them and have been caught in horrific storms where i cant even see its raining so hard and i stayed dry = invest in decent gear

only a couple of times has rain come through the visor and that was because i had to ride with it slightly open to stop the inside steaming up.

the cbr screen is good weather protection and you can duck behind it for some shelter.

the helmet goes further back than my motorcycle jacket collar so water runs helmet onto back and lap and not down my neck.

careful your jumper/ t shirt sleeves dont absorb water from your gloves and pull it all inside your waterproofs, same goes if your clothes are not tucked in properly.

Have a great trip and i hope you get decent weather. looking forward to any pics you take
 

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I asked about whether or not the gloves are meant to be worn on the inside or outside by my dealer when I first got my bike with jacket + gloves, he said it was down to personal preference but that the general consensus was "cold/wet, gloves over jacket, warm/hot, gloves inside jacket". I have always worn my gloves over my jacket though, regardless of weather. Helps in the rain :)

Also, what Dukie said. Invest in a decent set of gear, if there's any chance of rain where you are going, I'd be wearing gear designed for wet weather riding. I myself have Dri-Rider Speed jacket and Nordic pants, which are awesome for cold/wet days. That and the pants have got swag.
 

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All good tips from Dukie.

I'll add - always keep your tires in the tire track from the car in front of you. The car tire will have squeegeed the water away temporarily, and will give you more traction and control. Good tip about the puddles/potholes.

Slow down, increase distances, and ride smart, but be prepared for some added stress and tension when riding in the rain. Try to relax but stay alert and make sure you are not riding tensed and stiff.

EDIT: Another important thing to always do in the rain, as Micheal noted below, is to keep your inputs smooth.


Jay
 

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Ride your brakes at low speed to "wipe" the water and any other crap off of the discs, ensure they work.

This will most likely only apply if you park your bike outside of a garage, and it's been raining before you depart. My house is raised above the road level, so I get to test the front and rear brakes rolling down to the road, just to make sure no wildlife/dingos/other-fictional-australian-beast has been gnawing at my brakelines, and the discs are free of animal faeces.

In any case, checking the brakes is good practice as part of your general checkup (lights, oil, etc) before you start blipping out of your street.
 

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Jumping into a car if it is about to rain is for wusses.

Get some decent rain gear; waterproof jacket and over trousers, for a start.

Some rain gear has a soft cloth liner to the collar that absorbs a little water, and prevents seepage. if you don't have that some kind of a scarf can help.

If i am in a colder climate I wear woolen under gear. It will absorb a little seepage without feeling wet, and will keep you warm even if it is a bit wet.

When riding Keep plenty of distance between your bike and other traffic. Travel slower than you would normally, plan well ahead, and be very smooth in your acceleration, braking, and changes of direction. Keep the bike more upright than usual when cornering; shift your body weight into the direction of the corner more (you notice racers doing that when riding in the rain).
 

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Everyone here has it all covered, so I don't really have much to add here.

You end up just getting used to it. When you don't have a car to drive, there isn't another choice.

Sometimes I get wet, most of the time I don't. I don't have waterproof boots, but unless it's hours of riding in the rain my feet stay dry.

Jumping into a car if it is about to rain is for wusses.
That is totally true.
 

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i have a cheap $15 neoprene rain suit i carry in my tank bag when im on a longer ride...unless its a big downpour i dont even bother with it if its hot out..i usually dry off in 15 minutes anyway riding up the road....it has a hood that goes on under my helmet..no water down back...no water gets in my face shield...i just turn my head sideways occasionally to blow the water off my shield...slow down and use back brake more is the only other tip..seems you know about the painted lines and rest of it already....during summer months your guaranteed to get rained on around the mountains here during the course of the day
 

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I rode in the rain today, all I can say is however careful you are dry and sunny, you wanna increase that carefulness and times it by 4 and then you will reach a nice safe level. Remember Safe doesn't necessarily mean drive much slower where you are endangering yourself by gong slower than traffic, but it definitely means being less risky with your cuts, serves, and corners.
 

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It doesn't rain a whole lot, but when it does I'm out riding in it more often than not. There's some good advise in here, but here's one critical point that I have learned:

Be patient. The only times I've been in trouble in the rain is when I got in a hurry and decided to pass somebody, or tried to brake hard for a turn, or some other dumb nonsense.

So. Going to miss your turn? Take the next one. Really want to pass that moron doing 35 in a 55? Let it ride.
 

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I generally ride any day it isn't raining when I leave home, but it rains allot in the afternoons here in Florida, so I am always getting caught in the rain.

I carry 3 or 4 ziplock bags in my inside jacket pockets for cellphone, mp3, wallet, etc. My Triumph jacket had a pocket on the bottom rear to hold the waterproof overshell. I also kept my water proof pants in the same pocket so I could be waterproof in a few minutes when needed.

I also have a one-piece waterproof suit if I know I am going on a long ride in the rain.

In normal rain I will stay dry, in extreme downpours, I am getting wet too:eek:
 

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I used to commute to work in the rain a lot. Now I don't have to ride in the rain and I don't. Riding a bike in the rain sucks.
The best piece of rain gear I ever had was a 1-piece rain suit. Don't cheap out on a 2-piece suit if a 1-piece is available. Get one with sealed seams and storm flaps on all the zippers and buy a suit intended for motorcycle use, not camping.
Riding on a wet road demands that you ride smoothly, with no sudden throttle or handlebar input and you have to stay well behind whatever is in front of you to mimimize any sudden braking. You have to anticipate a lot more than on dry pavement so any braking is slow and smooth. That doesn't mean you won't still go down if you hit a painted section while you're braking or an unseen patch of oil (like I did once - ouch).
Riding in the rain stinks. Don't believe anyone who tells you otherwise.
 

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I ride in the high spots in my lane when its raining so i dont ride in the standing water. i also got quick removable mud flaps to keep the water off my back and the mud off my engine.
 

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since my first ride in the rain about a month ago, which was an all out nasty thunderstorm at sundown and into the dark of night, with no rain gear, i second what the other folks are saying..good rain gear is a plus, riding ithe rain is a bit intense so keep your cool, and this bike handles extremely well in the rain and feels very stable in the rain..just be careful, keep a cool head, and go for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hi Folks,
Planning on my first mini-trip in a couple of weeks. I think I know the basics about watching for oil slicks and painted lines and such. However, how do you keep water from running down your neck and coming in through your face shield? Does the 250 windshield keep much of the rain away from you?
Thanks for any comments.
Regards,
George
Wow,
Thanks so much to all of you who left comments and tips. They are all well received and I am sure, if I am able to pay attention to them, will be extremely valuable. Truly appreciated from a nice community of people.
As I mentioned, I plan a mini-trip to the mountains over the next few weeks. I picked up my motorcycle a few days ago. Getting a motorcycle and trying to learn to ride again has been a somewhat daunting task; however, will say that the 250 was the right choice as it is confidence inspiring. In my opinion, it allows many mistakes that a 600 or larger motorcycle wouldn’t.
The last time I rode with any regularity was 1970. Yes, a few years ago.
I have a rain suit, waterproof boots, and will buy some of the rubber gloves to slip over the gloves I use for riding.
Anyway, again, thanks so much.
Regards,
George
 

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It's a "windscreen" not a "windsheild" or a "windroof". Buy a shammy, secure it to a glove, so if it shd rain you can wipe you "helmet sheild" to keep it clear. Works for me! Along with rain gear.
 

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Lots of great information here, I can't add anything really. My touring days are over but I do ride nearly every day rain or shine and I just have a cheap Costso rain suit that I slip on usually after I'm already wet.

One thing is if you get and wet and cold for an extended period your thought process and reaction time slow down so be careful and if your travelling any distance buy good gear....for comfort as well as safety. Happy travels.
 

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I ride in the rain every other day in the spring. The CBR250R is very good for it. The stock tires stick like glue. The windshield and fairing will keep you totally dry except for your fingers and your toes if you can lay on the tank to ride in a tuck or on a tank bag for a little higher position. There is a spot 2-3 inches high just over the top of the windscreen where hardly any rain strikes your visor and any rain that does get on you visor will bead and blow straight down and off. I can make the entire highway section of my commute without having to wipe the visor, which a good leather glove does quite nicely. The bike handles sidewinds much better, the lower and more anchored to the tank your position is also.
 

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With barely 400 miles of motorcycling experience, I encountered a brief storm last weekend. First time riding in the rain.

I try to only ride when the chance of rain is low, but I really wanted to take it with me on my weekend adventure. I could see the rain from miles away, under a single large cumulus cloud with lightning shooting from all sides.

When I got to the storm... I was on an interstate with a 70mph speed limit during rush hour. I stayed between 70-75mph to keep up with traffic, and it really wasn't that bad. Big raindrops sting at that speed, so be sure to at least cover up. The crosswinds made it a little unnerving, but I basically just stayed loose on the handle bars and it kept mostly straight. Was not nearly as bad as I expected.

Girlfriend and I rode the bike in the rain just a couple days ago, semi-intentionally. Was nice.
 
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