Honda CBR 250 Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Moderator
Joined
·
745 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Since there are a lot of new riders on this forum, I think it would be good idea to routinely talk about technique and how to get better. And, no, I'm not trying to indicate that I am smarter or more skilled or better looking than anyone else on here (even if the last one DOES happen to be true!).

So, Target Fixation... Simply put, your eyes tend to lock onto objects of interest and you also tend to drive or ride toward whatever you are looking at. Here's an example:

YouTube - Target Fixation

Here's another:

YouTube - Bex's Willow Incident

Think it only happens on the track?

YouTube - Classic Target Fixation

Anything that captures your attention - a sign, a dog, a car, a wall, whatever - will, unless corrected, lead to your steering toward the very thing you are trying to avoid. I've responded to calls where a dog behind a fence "led" to a rider exiting the road toward the animal.

So the next time you're out cruising, work on two things:

  • Don't let your eyes drive your hands: This might sound wrong - after all, the goal is that we instinctively react (correctly) to a threat, right? Start with something simple and safe like roadside signs. Ride two feet off the center line and read a sign. If you look back to the road and find yourself another foot away from the line, your bike followed your eyes.
  • Register the object you want to avoid, then sight where you want to go: Pick the line you need to take in order to avoid the pothole, oil stain, dead squirrel, whatever, then focus your attention on that line. This might sound counter-intuititive as well: after all, if it's a dog, you want to keep an eye on that sucker, right? The short answer is no - if you focus on the dog, you will follow or hit him. In addition, you will lose track of surrounding traffic as well as where you are on the road surface.
Avoiding TF is a exercise you can undertake any time you ride, because the short story is that a safe and successful ride includes avoiding a multitude of objects. Use those mundane and non-life-threatening "hazards" to hone your skills for the day you compete for points.

Luke
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
636 Posts
so true luke..except for the better looking part;-> object fixation is definately real. there are many examlpes on youtube of objects big and small even large stationary walls!
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
745 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Remember that left alone, your bike will continue on the route it was on. Code discusses in "Twist of the Wrist" how if you bank a motorcycle and center the bars, it will continue in that position (and that rate of turn) until the load shifts, pressure is applied to the bars, or you run out of gas.

And no, I'm not saying take your hands off the bars when you go to look at something. However, do concentrate on not changing your bar pressure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
636 Posts
i was just viewing some segments of twist of the wrist last night on you tube..im going to the library to chek that out theres lots to learn in some books out there..
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
745 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I've got both his books ("Twist of the Wrist" and "Twist of the Wrist II"). I like the way he writes - breaks stuff down into easy to understand facts about dynamics, physics, and perception. I recommend them to anyone who is learning to ride or trying to get to the next level of riding.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top