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Discussion Starter #1
Just minding my own business on the highway. Doing about 72 mph in the right-hand lane.
I'm coming up on a Civic a few dozen yards ahead of me, and it's probably doing about 68 mph.
I get a little closer, throw on my left signal, do a shoulder check and dip into the other lane.
I'm slowly overtaking this Honda Civic, just about up to the driver-side window, when I see him start to cross the center line.
My heart skips a beat as I fumble for a second and then brake moderately hard and lay on the horn as the driver cuts in.
He gives me the SMIDSY one-hand wave in the rear-view mirror while I was still catching my breath.
After 3,500+ miles on my CBR, that was the first time I wished I was riding a 600 or a liter bike. A little harder twist on the throttle and I'm out of there.
My 250 is out of breath at such speeds.

I fumbled because I tried to decide between accelerating, honking and breaking.
1.) Accelerate - I would have no chance of speeding up enough before he switched lanes. I might've been lucky enough to be seen by the driver, but probably not. Result: Dead.
2.) Honk - No guarantee he wouldn't continue to my lane. Result: Dead.
3.) Break - It worked, but it was still way too close of a call. Result: Still breathing.

Anyone had any similar experiences riding a 250?
I love my bike, but I think it would be nice to have some extra power available.
I may be in the market again soon...
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Also, I'm a bit of a bigger guy, who takes passengers on occasion.
I think it would be nice to have something physically bigger and more powerful for these reasons as well.
Hm, I might just be looking at some CBR600's or something next week. Any thoughts?
 

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At that kind of speed, acceleration would not be instantaneous for any cc bike, so 600cc or larger cc bike would not have made any difference. From the moment you see someone crossing into your lane to when the vehicle hits you happens in matter of a second. From around 70 mph it takes quite a bit of time to accelerate for any cc bikes. The best course of action, and the fastest, would have been to swerve away or to slow down.

However, if you need a motive to get a larger cc bike, just go for it. You don't have to ride a 250cc bike.
 

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I've had two encounters similar to this in the last 5 days, albeit at slower speeds. The first time I was in second gear and managed to swerve and gas it to safety. Didn't give it a second thought. This morning, however, I was in 5th gear and had no option but to perform an e-brake to avoid a collision. Perhaps I could have accelerated if I was in 3rd or on a different bike. But, the fact that it was a non incident proves that i made the right decision in those circumstances. If you want a bigger bike, get one. I would be all over a 600 if it wasn't highway robbery for insurance at my age.
 

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At that kind of speed, acceleration would not be instantaneous for any cc bike, so 600cc or larger cc bike would not have made any difference.
Thailand is no where near the same as the U.S. But when i hit the sad excuse for a highway here (interstae) my 600 is always in 3rd gear for the exact reason stated before by rdxj . And it will go like the wind.

I use AlOT of fuel. But when you have idiots 50/50 over one lane out of 3. It pays to anticipate the idiocy. On the Cbee i hang back and just go with the flow.
 

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Imho:

Whichever bike you chose, whatever option, gas or brake, you go for, there are 3 thinks to take into account, anyway:

1. having or getting a car sounding loud horn

2. using it at the first sign of someone only may think about to get into your lane.

3. keeping overtaking manoevers as short, as possible. 'truckraces' are for trucks, a motorcycle is passing or staying behind. But no slowly passing/traveling aside a bigger vehicle. Staying in the blind spot for some time is never good.
 

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Others have said it in different ways. On a bike you minimize the time you are in danger zones and blind spots. Pass slower cars quickly and faster cars maybe not at all.
 

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At that kind of speed, acceleration would not be instantaneous for any cc bike, so 600cc or larger cc bike would not have made any difference.
I'll have to differ with you there. I've ridden plenty of bigger bikes and whilst it is true that a sports 600 at 70mph in top will be out of it's power band and not likely to feel like it's doing much when you open the throttle there are many other bikes eg big twins, retros, tourers etc that will all be tuned to provide a great deal of shove in that situation. I once had to back off mid overtake on a VFR750 because I got wheelspin on the wet road at 70.

I'm guessing you haven't ridden many bigger bikes. Take up any offers you get and I think you'll be surprised how different the experience is to piloting a CBR250R.
 

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At that kind of speed, acceleration would not be instantaneous for any cc bike, so 600cc or larger cc bike would not have made any difference.
This is not true. Some 600cc bikes in top gear are geared quite tall, and would have a problem getting moving, but not all. Any liter bike, and the correct 600 class will have no issue. It is surprising how fast my Daytona is at 70 mph in 6th.
 

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I prefer a revbomb to the the horn. Of course if you have the stock pipe, as I do, the 250 will sound like a premium lawn mower getting cranky.


For a 'revbomb', you need longer as for a horn signal
Aside, the rev bomb eats valuable time, you could use for accelerating away.
And it still sounds like a 'opsi, I haven't seen a motorcycle'
If the reaction is that strong, like the '[email protected]@k, there is a car at my side' horn signal gets you?
Out of my experience with people, who even forgot during there overtaking manoever, that there was someone to overtake in the first place, and cutting into this someones lane straight after, I would say:

Get yourself better a real loud and in best case like a truck sounding horn.
 

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Some will disagree, but in a situation that requires you to take evasive action, the horn does 2 things: 1. The decision to sound the horn and then making the action eats up valuable time that could be used to swerve/brake/accelerate. 2. Sounding the horn and hoping the driver reacts accordingly places responsibility for your safety on them, which is not ideal. I can honestly say I have never used the horn in the heat of the moment. Only as a gesture upon departing the situarion. I do rev bomb a bit, mostly just to make my presence heard as I filter through congested traffic.

On topic, it doesn't matter if you ride a 50cc scooter or a H2, you need to acknowledge the limitations and stengths of your motorcycle and ride accordingly, practice maneuvers accordingly, and react intelligently when the time comes.
 

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I cringe when inexperienced riders sit in my blind spot.


Make me feel like giving them a scare to wake them up to themselves, but sadly they have to learn the hard way, or not at all and end up dead.


NEVER in 40 yrs of riding have wanted more power on any bike in the name of safety.
 

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:wink2:
I never thought about, that using my horn is disengaging the powertrain.
And thinking it over now, no it wont do that.
I can honk, accelerate/brake , swerve, all in the same time.

'Rev-bombers' somehow give up on the accelerating option for 1 or 2 secs.
And on the 100% handbrake control, at the bomb time.

Also I never sound the horn as the only thing to do.
It's a more automated behavior, than you may think.
And in the same moment, I try to get as far away to the side, as I can/have to.
And depending on the pos./neg. difference in the vehicle speed, either accelerate or brake.

And its so useless 'as a gesture upon departing the situation'.
If it's done, it's done. It only helps, before something happens.
0:)

And that is for me the biggest negative point, on the new horn signal button design of Honda:
It is not at a handy point, anymore!
The thumb needs to move up, now, not only to the right!


(sry, only had pictures of two clicks ;-)
 

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That is exactly why I have my dual Fiamm horns (with relay) on my bike, or ANY motorcycle I own, for that matter. He would have changed his mind quickly, I assure you. At least they always have for me.

edit: But really, you should not be leisurely passing other vehicles.
Move over, tuck down as far as practical, and get on the gas.
 

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NEVER in 40 yrs of riding have wanted more power on any bike in the name of safety.
I'm with Aufitt here (but I've only got 30 years of road riding under me). Accelerating out of the situation is rarely if ever the right response. And I've ridden everything from a liter bike to a cruiser, and even a moped.

The best thing to do is plan your escape before you go to pass. Then don't dawdle with the pass. Just expect that people will change lanes into you - it happens - a lot.

The next best thing is learning how to emergency brake. A little 250 will decelerate mighty quickly! I haven't seen a stopping distance comparison, but it sure feels like my 250 will brake harder than my 600 on the track. (I know, that's not the same as on the road.)

Honking and loud pipes are good, but I've also seen people do some stupid maneuvers when they are surprised by a horn or rev drop.

In any event, I'm glad you made it out OK and learned from it. There's a lot of good reasons to get a higher cc bike, but I'm not sure safety tops that list.
 

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Two years ago I was on a 300 mile ride when I attempted to pass a pickup tailgating a pickup hauling a 4-horse trailer. A curve came up too soon and I needed to squeeze in behind the trailer rather than pass them both. Obviously, I should have waited for a longer straight, empty stretch of road before passing.

You do not want to be "exposed" while passing any longer than necessary. Do it quickly and return to your lane.

That led me to consider a little more passing capability and ABS to replace my 24 year old 250.

BTW, the new bike did fine on a 3300 mile trip to Montana this summer.
 

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I feel braking hard is the correct thing to do, in that situation. Making some sort of commotion, to the left of the driver, could provoke some unusual reaction from him.

I wear hi-vis attire, and drive with the high beams on. Hoping to be seen coming. Also, always pass with authority.

I understand the desire for a bigger bike, I have had many. Today... the CBR250R (my current, and only bike) is enough. Seems I like single cylinder engines. Something about that pulse of the single that just makes me feel good. Go figure.
 

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I feel braking hard is the correct thing to do, in that situation.
In a civilized country maybe. Out here everything tailgates bikes. From other bikes,buses & 18 wheelers. I prefer holding in 3rd for the "what if situations". Enough torque to pull / get away & enough to keep control if i have to eb.

I am much more carful on the 250. No worse situation than being sandwiched between two buses with no way out when they begin to merge lanes. As most people here are in a kookoo land of their own when they drive.
 
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