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Discussion Starter #42
Guess he's not saying. Many of the motorcycle wrecks and near misses I see being discussed on sport bike forums are at least 50% the fault of the rider himself being impatient or getting in a rush.
Hi, post #24 . Thanks.
I was going a good 7 mph over the limit. I don't know if that's necessarily a "rush" though.
 

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Slowing down is usually (not always) safer than speeding up. Most of my close calls in any vehicle occurred at higher speeds where there is less margin for error. Like in this case, had the original poster accelerated hard to avoid the hazard, he might have been unable to deal with a second hazard if it popped up suddenly.

That said, I weigh 235 pounds. When I add a passenger the bike is overloaded and it feels it.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
The rush was trying passing someone that was also about to pass the vehicle in front of him. If you want to be safe on the road it helps to have a sense of what other people will do and anticipate.
As someone said earlier, you can't anticipate at what point a driver will lane change and for what reason. I'm pretty sure there was a car ahead of him about a football field away. If there was a car remotely close in front of him, I'm sure I would've noticed.
I live in Iowa. Our highways don't see that much traffic anyways.
I'm very aware of what's going on around me when I ride, but I can't predict everything.
 

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Did you have your headlamp on regular or high beam?

(Not that it would have forced the driver to see you, though.)
 

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As someone said earlier, you can't anticipate at what point a driver will lane change and for what reason.
Of course you can anticipate these kinds of things. People will often signal their intention to change lanes (though not always). That's a pretty good indication that they plan to change lanes. There may be construction up ahead - and a requirement to merge. There may be a highway merge lane approaching and drivers may change lanes to accommodate drivers entering the roadway. There may be slower traffic up ahead in the same lane that the driver wishes to overtake. A driver may be approaching road obstructions. There may be a cyclist up ahead, or an emergency vehicle on the roadside that requires vehicles to slow down and change lanes to give them space. There may be an emergency vehicle (e.g., ambulance) approaching. This SHOULD prompt people to change lanes and pull off and stop on the right-hand shoulder (in many instances). A driver may begin to move towards another lane (without signalling). This could mean for instance, that they are having trouble staying in their lane (windy conditions?) or that they plan to change lanes without signalling. Stay away from them.

Maybe you meant to say "You can't ALWAYS anticipate at what point a driver will lane change and for what reason".
 

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Today is the day I start to look for a replacement for the cbr. We have had some good times together. Almost three years of daily riding. She put up with my noobish abuse in the early days. And she gets me around in style and comfort. I'm going to test ride all the jap supersport bikes over the next few weeks and pick the one that fits me best... and that makes me grin the most when I look at it.
 

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plenty of good advice here, but doesnt hurt to repeat
a basic reality in any,, road space dispute;
you simply cannot trust them..

a lovely child or inexperienced mother
or anyone with a loaded gun, for eg,
represents a real risk, despite and aside from
whoever and whatever they may be
as a citizen or as a person..

no doubt, a more powerful motorcycle can,
accelerate more quickly, including in overtakes..
however, consider yourself at the lights
next to a more powerful motorcycle,
you intent on getting a good take off
while she contemplates some distraction
or other, as the lights change..
then, in those microseconds, your response
will be faster than her reactions and redirect
of attention back to taking off..
too late, you have gone..

within a road space your attention
and response time are vital..
if he's already started turning
into your space esp at speed,
its too late if you havnt already
taken off in response...

riders on powerful bikes get taken out
in these situations.. riders on less powerful
bikes can also avoid impact, depending on
their state of readiness to respond..

while this does improve with experience
becoming more of a reflex response,
even the skilled reflex response must begin
with intent, as mind must be on the task
at hand to create that reflex response..

thus then on multi-lane roads you must
ride with a basic assumption, such as
that they dont know youre there,,
or that they are incompetent, half blind,
dont look, dont care, or intend to get you..

this is not unrealistic as when passing many
cars, trucks, vans etc, there will be,,
those who dont see you, are incompetent,
are driving distracted, and even the few
percent likely to play a power game
with their heavy vehicle..

placement in the lane or lanes,
incl relative to their blind spots etc
is important.. your approach is also
relevant.. doesnt hurt or take time
to come up within their mirror view
and if overtaking, make a noise
and move in and out of their view
as part of your preparation for
the potential overtake..

i used to ride a 750/4 with open 4 into 1
exhaust, entering t heir mirror view zone,
watching for eye contact while blipping
or if no eye contact a touch of the horn..
no need to blast it, just get their attention
away from the video game or texting
some of them are doing driving..

thing is that cb750 had plenty of power
which was great for completing the overtake
but not to be relied upon for evasion
at that last microsecond before,
beginning the move or response..

distracted driving is now a greater
cause of smashes than alcohol
or speeding..

people are and do text messages,
check their emails and social media etc,
and do eat, drink, or otherwise be
distracted while driving..

just because you can see them,
does not mean,, their attention
is on you or on driving..
or for that matter pedestrians
walking out in front of you..

riding a motorcycle is different
in many ways to driving a car..
one being the necessity for
us to take responsibility
for interactions with cars..

this isnt down to fairness or whatever..
its a simple fact of the matter..
develop this attitude..
make it a 'background' part of
any riding within or near cars
or traffic or even pedestrians..

then your brain will learn to
include it as part of your suite
of natural riding reflex responses..
 

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I prefer a revbomb to the the horn. Of course if you have the stock pipe, as I do, the 250 will sound like a premium lawn mower getting cranky.
My R100RS had a great set of stock horns, they were FIAMMs and were always an attention getter. Especially in extended engagement.
 

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You make a good point. In reality just being hyper-vigillent to upcoming dangers will "buy you more time" than being on a 1000cc bike. The best favor you can do for yourself is to keep enough gap between you and the cars so that you can react quickly to any unanticipated behavior from the cars.

Let us also consider that when stopped at a red light and if some car went "out of control" and came at you that a lightweight bike is easier to handle at a full stop and to roll it around compared to a 500lb++ bike

Let us consider that a lightweight bike is more nimble and agile and can change directions faster or swerve away from danger. I see the guys on a fat Harley that weight over 700 lbs and they look like a clown in the parking lot and when doing low speed maneuvers they waddle around like a duck with that 700lb behemoth.

Buy a faster bike if you want more speed but let us not delude ourselves that it is for reasons of safety. Because if we are talking about safety we can assume that a guy on a SuperSport is going to naturally ride faster and take more risks than a guy on a 250cc CBR and that naturally is going to put the rider in more dangerous situations overall and more frequently.

And also in my personal opinion a rider should MASTER the 250 or 300cc bike first. And when I say Master it I mean COMPLETELY........ that you can carve up the twisties and make tight U-turns effortlessly and make perfect turns leaned over so far that you are scrapping the toe of your boot. I think very few people reach that level of mastery before they "think they are ready to graduate to a 600".

If a chap keeps selling their bike in less than 2 years how will they ever reach such a level of mastery? The answer is that they will not. And when the fateful day arrives that you are "put to the test" in a crazy situation you will either have the Mastery of skills to escape the crash or you will pay the Ultimate Price. That is the true danger of riding a bike like a 600 that you do not possess the proper skills to navigate a crash situation and escape from it. This is why I do not advocate for beginners to EVER start on a 600 or above as a learning bike.

In my opinion one should move up from a 250 only when they have mastered it, the same way you move up different color belts in Karate

plenty of good advice here, but doesnt hurt to repeat
a basic reality in any,, road space dispute;
you simply cannot trust them..

a lovely child or inexperienced mother
or anyone with a loaded gun, for eg,
represents a real risk, despite and aside from
whoever and whatever they may be
as a citizen or as a person..

no doubt, a more powerful motorcycle can,
accelerate more quickly, including in overtakes..
however, consider yourself at the lights
next to a more powerful motorcycle,
you intent on getting a good take off
while she contemplates some distraction
or other, as the lights change..
then, in those microseconds, your response
will be faster than her reactions and redirect
of attention back to taking off..
too late, you have gone..

within a road space your attention
and response time are vital..
if he's already started turning
into your space esp at speed,
its too late if you havnt already
taken off in response...

riders on powerful bikes get taken out
in these situations.. riders on less powerful
bikes can also avoid impact, depending on
their state of readiness to respond..

while this does improve with experience
becoming more of a reflex response,
even the skilled reflex response must begin
with intent, as mind must be on the task
at hand to create that reflex response..

thus then on multi-lane roads you must
ride with a basic assumption, such as
that they dont know youre there,,
or that they are incompetent, half blind,
dont look, dont care, or intend to get you..

this is not unrealistic as when passing many
cars, trucks, vans etc, there will be,,
those who dont see you, are incompetent,
are driving distracted, and even the few
percent likely to play a power game
with their heavy vehicle..

placement in the lane or lanes,
incl relative to their blind spots etc
is important.. your approach is also
relevant.. doesnt hurt or take time
to come up within their mirror view
and if overtaking, make a noise
and move in and out of their view
as part of your preparation for
the potential overtake..

i used to ride a 750/4 with open 4 into 1
exhaust, entering t heir mirror view zone,
watching for eye contact while blipping
or if no eye contact a touch of the horn..
no need to blast it, just get their attention
away from the video game or texting
some of them are doing driving..

thing is that cb750 had plenty of power
which was great for completing the overtake
but not to be relied upon for evasion
at that last microsecond before,
beginning the move or response..

distracted driving is now a greater
cause of smashes than alcohol
or speeding..

people are and do text messages,
check their emails and social media etc,
and do eat, drink, or otherwise be
distracted while driving..

just because you can see them,
does not mean,, their attention
is on you or on driving..
or for that matter pedestrians
walking out in front of you..

riding a motorcycle is different
in many ways to driving a car..
one being the necessity for
us to take responsibility
for interactions with cars..

this isnt down to fairness or whatever..
its a simple fact of the matter..
develop this attitude..
make it a 'background' part of
any riding within or near cars
or traffic or even pedestrians..

then your brain will learn to
include it as part of your suite
of natural riding reflex responses..
 

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Only had time to read the first page but here is my advise...

Teach yourself to brake out of situations. A bike once the throttle is released will slow down very fast, add front and rear brakes and its real quick.

If I have someone coming into my lane NO WAY do I fumble with the horn! What if he doesn't hear it? What if he doesn't care? First priority is get out of there. I would go to edge of lane and brake out of the danger. THEN apply the horn when out of danger to alert him to his fault.
 

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Only had time to read the first page but here is my advise...

Teach yourself to brake out of situations. A bike once the throttle is released will slow down very fast, add front and rear brakes and its real quick.

If I have someone coming into my lane NO WAY do I fumble with the horn! What if he doesn't hear it? What if he doesn't care? First priority is get out of there. I would go to edge of lane and brake out of the danger. THEN apply the horn when out of danger to alert him to his fault.
^ Absolutely!

Using the horn is like a wake-up call for the driver. Don't expect a response, and if they do react it may make the situation worse.

Do whatever you need to do to get yourself out of the way - ride on the edge of the road, the line, whatever, to avoid contact. You don't need much room.

Even after the situation has been resolved, using the horn could cause a negative reaction from the driver. People can get angry when they are confronted.

Best idea is to just let it go.
 

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How do you feel about giving a tiny toot to cars that are sticking out their nose like they are about to pull out in front of you?

I remember in my first month of driving I was paranoid and thought every car would pull out in front of me (did not see me) and I gave them all a warning toot.
 

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How do you feel about giving a tiny toot to cars that are sticking out their nose like they are about to pull out in front of you?

I remember in my first month of driving I was paranoid and thought every car would pull out in front of me (did not see me) and I gave them all a warning toot.
I'd have my horn on all the time!

Doesn't seem like it would be an effective preventative measure. Different people think a "toot" means different things.

I almost never use the horn.

Keep your headlight on high, wear something other than black gear, slow when entering busy intersections, keep 2 fingers on the front brake, have good tires, know your limits, be ready to react.

That's worked for me for over 40 years on the street - but it's no guarantee it will work tomorrow.
 

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How do you feel at night about flashing the headlights from low to high for about 2 seconds to "warn" a left turning car (oncoming car) that you are coming thru and that he should not attempt to turn left in front of you
 

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How do you feel at night about flashing the headlights from low to high for about 2 seconds to "warn" a left turning car (oncoming car) that you are coming thru and that he should not attempt to turn left in front of you
Again - not a fan.

One reason is that it's not a "universal" signal of anything. Some might think it means - "...go ahead...".

It gives you one more thing to do when you should be prepared to react immediately if necessary.

Just slow and watch the front wheel for movement. It's the easiest way to tell if a stopped vehicle is starting to move or moving slowly.

Remember, you don't need to haul it down completely to avoid a collision. Sometimes avoidance, instead of stopping, is a better move. If you happen to have a car pull out in front of you, and it's right in the middle of your path, plan your avoidance route to the rear instead of the front of the car. Chances are good the car will continue moving forward, giving you more room and a better chance of missing it.
 
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