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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Foggy, damp morning in Chicago. I had to brake hard for a red light at 60 mph. I went ahead and squeezed the front brake hard. ABS activated and the bike stopped straight and secure without me modulating the brake. Worth every penny when conditions are less than perfect.
 

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Glad the ABS worked. BTW, I may have asked and you may have answered this before, but where in the Chicago area are you? I'm right near O'hare.
 

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I've got the ABS model, too. Haven't had to put it to the test yet. Found myself at about 55mph and popped over a hill to a school bus flashing its lights for a stop. I knew I had to stop quickly and for some reason 'pumped' the front brake... what was I thinking? It was perfectly clear and dry road conditions, but I had a car behind me and maybe I was thinking I'd be flashing my tail light at him?!?

Not sure the ABS would have kicked in regardless because the road was dry, but I need to learn to trust the brakes and bike's handling for situations like this and not over analyze it.

(BTW: I'm a BRAND NEW rider--got my MSF license 3/11, bike was delivered 3/16 and this happened 3/20.) I'm learning and look to each experience as an opportunity to improve. Thanks for sharing your experience!
 

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I started playing with the ABS a few times this week. Dry road, 45mph, check the ABS light is out, no cars behind me, then brake as hard as I can. The front fork fully compresses almost instantly, metal on metal, and the ABS is only noticeable for maybe the last second. It stops fast. Not much different doing the same on wet pavement. Pretty amazing for a sub-$5k bike.
 

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If you had to brake so hard that ABS kicked in to stop for a red light, you were riding too fast for the conditions and/or not aware of what was going on around you.

ABS may have saved your arse, but did it make you a safer rider? No.

Fail.
 

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Anticipating the unexpected is a good rule of thumb. i.e. traffic lights and cresting a hill. One does'nt know what is on the other side of the hill, someone passing another vehicle in your lane, school bus with kids crossing the road....Whether in my car or riding my bike I tend to hug closer to the shoulder when cresting a hill anticipating the unkn. Learned and applied this driving emergency vehicles. I've owned two bikes with ABS and have yet to engage, or come close to engaging the ABS on either one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
If you had to brake so hard that ABS kicked in to stop for a red light, you were riding too fast for the conditions and/or not aware of what was going on around you.

Did ABS make you a safer rider? No.

Fail.
Fail yourself. No bike will make a safer rider.

ABS allowed me to mash the brake and let the bike do the work. It stopped straight and secure. I now know if I have a panic stop in wet / dirty conditions, the bike will prevent the wheels from locking and give me a excellent chance of staying up.

I learned to drive cars and ride motorcycles at a high level without ABS. I will never buy another auto or streetbike without it.
 

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Fail yourself. No bike will make a safer rider.

ABS allowed me to mash the brake and let the bike do the work. It stopped straight and secure. I now know if I have a panic stop in wet / dirty conditions, the bike will prevent the wheels from locking and give me a excellent chance of staying up.

I will never buy an automobile without ABS or stability assist if I can avoid it. Now that I've tested the ABS in the real world, I'll never buy a new street bike without it.
If you carry on having to do panic stops, ABS or not, you stand a good chance of becoming a busted up ex-rider, or a corpse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Anticipating the unexpected is a good rule of thumb. i.e. traffic lights and cresting a hill. One does'nt know what is on the other side of the hill, someone passing another vehicle in your lane, school bus with kids crossing the road....Whether in my car or riding my bike I tend to hug closer to the shoulder when cresting a hill anticipating the unkn. Learned and applied this driving emergency vehicles. I've owned two bikes with ABS and have yet to engage, or come close to engaging the ABS on either one.
Agreed. I've never had use for ABS on a bike or in a car on dry pavement. I take pride in my skills and driving defensively...expecting the worst from other drivers.
 

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pricelister never said that he wouldn't have been able to safely bring his bike to a stop in the absence of ABS nor did he say it was a "panic" stop.

What he did say is that he made a decision to use his ABS brakes as intended: firmly apply and hold the brakes and let the system do its job. And it worked.
 

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If you carry on having to do panic stops, ABS or not, you stand a good chance of becoming a busted up ex-rider, or a corpse.
If you carry on having to mash the brakes, ABS or not, sooner or later you stand a good chance of becoming a busted up ex-rider or a corpse.

There, edited it to satisfy the erudite Empty Sea.

In other words, ride to the conditions, and be aware of what is going on around you. For day to day riding, don't rely on technology; sooner or later you'll find yourself beyond the limit, and could well suffer as a result.
 

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I simply disagree that ABS will only kick in during what is being called a "panic" stop. Now, I grant you that I'm new to riding, but I suspect that there are times in every rider's life where he/she senses the lack of adhesion during a braking maneuver. With a traditional braking system, I assume the correct reaction would be to get off the brakes or pump them. With an ABS system, I assume the correct reaction would be to hold the brakes on. Again, maybe either or both of my assumptions are wrong (I've only based them on what I've read) but, if they are correct, then pricelister did, in fact, use correct technique.

Having said all that, I couldn't agree more with the comments by live-to-ride, michael, and highflyer (and even pricelister himself) when they indicate that better anticipation and "riding ahead" are techniques that need to be employed at all times to avoid having to jump on the brakes (ABS or otherwise) in the first place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Lots of worthy input here. ABS is a worthwhile safety device like a helmet, gloves, boots, and armored gear. In a perfect world, none will be needed.
 
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