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Alright guys, so i’m in the market for a sports bike , i’m a bigger guy. About 280LBS and i’m curious as to if a 250r would be the right choice for me? I love the way they look and would love to own one, i’m just worried about highway driving will i be able to get up to speed? lol thanks in advance guys!
 

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Alright guys, so i’m in the market for a sports bike , i’m a bigger guy. About 280LBS and i’m curious as to if a 250r would be the right choice for me? I love the way they look and would love to own one, i’m just worried about highway driving will i be able to get up to speed? lol thanks in advance guys!
Hi
I do not think there will be a weight problem(280lb=127Kg). The problem is usually in the height and the width. Up to 1.8 meters this is possible. The problem is usually with the wind and not with the weight. The tow generated by the wind at speeds of over 80 km / h is much more significant than the weight differences.
If your height does not exceed 1.80m you may be able to lower some of the tow by lying under the windshield. If you are very tall and wide the windshield will not be effective for you.
The cruising speed of the CBR250R is 100-110 km / h, that is without any effort to "fold" under the windshield.
A 250 cc engine is not suitable for highways.
According to the manufacturer's data MAX loaded is 353lb(160Kg) including rider, passenger, all luggage, and accessories.
 

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I've taken passengers plenty of times with combined weight > than your 280-lbs. No big deal. Weight really only affects acceleration. Cruising and top-speed will be same as it's dictated by total aero-drag vs. power. I can cruise at 130kph all day long with passenger, average-speed on U.S. highways on my Ninja 250.
 

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Depends on how much highway driving you plan on doing. While the CBR250R is capable at highway speeds, it's not the bike I would choose if the majority of my riding was on the highway. Were that the case a slightly bigger engine and frame, like on a Ninja 400, might be better suited for that purpose. I'm 225lbs. and I think I'm at the upper limit of fitting on the CBR. It's completely comfortable thanks to the Honda's stellar ergonomics, but I don't kid myself that I don't look pretty darn big on my CBR. The CBR will fit larger people better than many other bikes in it's class, like the Yamaha R3 or MT-03, but in your case I feel like you may be wishing you bought something slightly bigger fairly quickly. The best advice is actually go to a dealer with a good selection of smaller bikes and sit on them all. You may find that the higher seat height on something like a KTM RC390 makes a huge difference.
 

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Everyone above is right. You didn't really mention if this is your first bike. If you already have some experience, like with dirtbikes for example, I suspect you'll be more happy on a 400cc or 500cc bike. The CBR500 gets a bad rap for some reason but complaints seem to come from seasoned riders. But for a big guy learning how to ride, I think this is probably appropriate. When you start getting into the 4 cylinder bikes (generally sport bikes 600cc's and up), then those are more for intermediate riders. 1 or 2 cylinder bikes are generally docile and can be driven by any beginner, assuming the bike is light enough that you can lean it over without dropping it and with a seat short enough to touch the ground. You can find the "wet" weight of any vehicle online. A Suzuki SV650 has a wet weight of about 430lbs, and the CBR250r is about 370lbs. You're a big guy. If you have the strength to hold up the extra 60lbs, you'll get more out of the the 650cc bike.

My opinion only, but...

Pros of a 250cc bike:
1) Affordable bike. Cheap to insure, repair, fuel, and buy.
2) Can be sold quickly. There area always new people entering the sport and every rider needs a first bike.
3) Small and nimble. Can be maneuvered easily under power and pushed around when not. Can park almost anywhere from sidewalks to unmarked parking lots.
4) Socially acceptable. Easy to convince loved ones it's safe.
5) Great to learn on. Everything you need to know about motorcycle riding can be learned on a 250cc. Any mistakes are generally not catastrophic.

Cons of a 250cc bike:
1) Generally a 1st bike. Prone to abuse, drops, crashes, neglect, and repairs/maintenance done by unskilled people new to the sport.
2) Limited interest. You will either exit the sport shortly after buying or move on to the next bigger bike. The next bike is generally a longer term purchase.
3) Less refined. There are more technologies on the more expensive bikes, although ABS and other traction controls are starting to make their way into the smaller affordable bikes.
4) Generally less stable. Larger bikes can handle the winds and road flaws better than lighter ones. You'll probably pee your pants the first time an 18 wheeler blows it's airstream into you.
 

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Alright guys, so i’m in the market for a sports bike , i’m a bigger guy. About 280LBS and i’m curious as to if a 250r would be the right choice for me? I love the way they look and would love to own one, i’m just worried about highway driving will i be able to get up to speed? lol thanks in advance guys!
Hi and welcome to the forum! I think the old rule applies here. For primarily highway and interstate use you should have a minimum of a 400cc, 2-cylinder bike. That said my CBR250 has done well for me on highways for over 9 years. I mostly use it for commuting but every year take a long ride with my sons and their bigger bikes. The CBR250 keeps up just fine and is more maneuverable. Good for the twisties. But the times we cruise mostly highway I miss my old 750 Nighthawk. The 250 will do highway speeds with no problem but the issue is the wind buffeting and hills. Overall my 250 has served as a swiss army knife of motorcycles and I intend to keep it.
 

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But the times we cruise mostly highway I miss my old 750 Nighthawk. The 250 will do highway speeds with no problem but the issue is the wind buffeting and hills. Overall my 250 has served as a swiss army knife of motorcycles and I intend to keep it.
I miss my old Yamaha Seca 400. "Small" as it was, it was a dream on the highway, but it was also a "naked" bike.
Unfortunately, the CBR's fairings act like a sail in a strong crosswind. There's nowhere for the air to pass through the frame and a stiff crosswind will try to blow the bike out from under you. The first time you experience it can be a bit unnerving. Riding a bike down a straight highway at a 60-degree angle does not feel "normal", LOL
Like everything else you adjust, but a heavier, more "planted" bike would be much more comfortable.
Luckily I never have cause to ride a highway. I bought my CBR to bomb around the plentiful 2-lane blacktop in my rural part of the state and it does that exceedingly well. :giggle:
 

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Alright guys, so i’m in the market for a sports bike , i’m a bigger guy. About 280LBS and i’m curious as to if a 250r would be the right choice for me? I love the way they look and would love to own one, i’m just worried about highway driving will i be able to get up to speed? lol thanks in advance guys!
One guy says he can cruise at 130 with pasaenger on us highway ,,,is not the highway in USA 55 mile an HR.
 

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An unmodified CBR won't go much faster than 85 mph. Maybe the guy was talking km/h?
Yes, it is almost impossible to reach that speed with two people (130 km / h). The main problem is with the wind resistance, the passenger sitting on an elevated seat therefore can not get under the air bubble created by the windshield. At CBR250R (2011) higher than 100-110 km / h (62-68mph) it is unpleasant and even for long periods of time it destroys our engine.
Therefore our motorcycle is not suitable for highways where in the slow lane the traffic flows at a speed of 120 km /h (75mph).
 

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At CBR250R (2011) higher than 100-110 km / h (62-68mph) it is unpleasant and even for long periods of time it destroys our engine.
Therefore our motorcycle is not suitable for highways where in the slow lane the traffic flows at a speed of 120 km /h (75mph).
That's the first time I hear that CBRs aren't highway capable and destroy their engines above 120km/h.😳
 

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That's the first time I hear that CBRs aren't highway capable and destroy their engines above 120km/h.😳
There is always a first time, but you may have heard it in a different wording, let's say: "Small engines that work hard at high rpm for..." ...

The CBR250R at 120 km / h is at 7000 rpm out of 10000 (the red line), and if you want overtaking then you downshifting, and going into around 8500 rpm because that's where most of the power .... whoever runs like this on a high rpm regularly reduces the number of engine hours significantly.

And also at speeds above 120 kph if your a 1.8m tall or more, It's hard to get under the "cocpit", and the whole business becomes very uncomfortable. And whoever decides to stay upright, the wind stops him, because the 250cc engine lacks power to effectively overcome the wind at this speed(over 120kph)...Small engines etc.
 
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