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Discussion Starter #1
I've had my 2012 CBR250RA for the past 5 years. Have not been riding the bike for a year or so and it wont start. Just replaced the battery but that won't get it going. Probably fuel pump failure and rust in tank. Cost of OEM parts alone comes out to around $500 (not including labor).

Thinking whether to spend the money to get it fixed by the dealer or to trade it as is for an upgrade. Not sure what I would get in trade for the bike with 4000 miles in current condition.

What options do I have now for an upgrade? I just walked in to the dealership this weekend after a few years to see what they got to offer and don't see much in stock as it used to be 5 years back. It is Southern Honda Motorsports, the largest dealership in the south east. Don't know what honda is going to announce in October but the dealership is running a big clearance event for everything in current stock.

I'm not ready for a super sport yet. So was interested in a bike in the 500, 650 or 700cc range. What options do I have? Or do I need to wait until October to see what Honda is releasing?
 

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IMHO, if you have had the bike for 5 years and have ridden 4000 miles, you do not need a motorcycle.
 

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IMHO, if you have had the bike for 5 years and have ridden 4000 miles, you do not need a motorcycle.
LOL. Hey, some of us aren't into the whole "iron butt" thing. I never seem to put in as many miles as I'd like on my bike every year, but I'd never, even consider being without one.
Out of the possibilities you mention, HPLover, I'd consider either a CBR500R or CB500F, but I think after comparing specs and prices I'd actually end up buying a Yamaha FZ-07. Wicked bang for the buck and a bike you wouldn't ever have to worry about outgrowing.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
IMHO, if you have had the bike for 5 years and have ridden 4000 miles, you do not need a motorcycle.
Partly true. I put the 4000 miles in the first 3 years and have not been riding for a year or two due to having a kid and spending most of my time around him. As TrueFaith said, I wouldn't consider without a bike. And that too not living in TN, there are amazing roads to ride closer to me but so little time. But think the dad thing is getting past me and I need to get back into riding again :smile2:.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
LOL. Hey, some of us aren't into the whole "iron butt" thing. I never seem to put in as many miles as I'd like on my bike every year, but I'd never, even consider being without one.
Out of the possibilities you mention, HPLover, I'd consider either a CBR500R or CB500F, but I think after comparing specs and prices I'd actually end up buying a Yamaha FZ-07. Wicked bang for the buck and a bike you wouldn't ever have to worry about outgrowing.
I looked at the CBx500x while at the dealership and that seemed to be a good choice. Any news of them getting a facelift in Oct?

Have to take a look at FZ-07.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
How about the Rebel 500? The new one looks a lot better and caught my eyes. Not bad at all. Has anyone got one? Any words?
 

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I looked at the CBx500x while at the dealership and that seemed to be a good choice. Any news of them getting a facelift in Oct?

Have to take a look at FZ-07.
How about the Rebel 500? The new one looks a lot better and caught my eyes. Not bad at all. Has anyone got one? Any words?
Big difference between the CB500X and the Rebel 500, they share the same engine, but that is where the similarity ends. Just depends on the style/type of riding you plan on doing. IMO the Rebel is basically an in-town street cruiser, whereas the CB500X is an Adventure Touring bike... @jsonder has owned a CB500X for the past few years, so maybe he'll post his first hand impressions of that bike.

Isn’t the 650F a good option after 250R?
Maybe... again depends on the rider. The CBR650F is a much bigger, heavier four cylinder bike, with about 60 more horse power than the 250R. For some it may be no big deal to transition to a 650F. For others it might be too much of a jump, both in terms of performance and size/weight.
 

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Cb500xa

I like dirt riding but, at 75, it has to be a light bike. Hence I ride a 270 pound, street legal CRF230L for my off road rambles.

When I bought the CRF in 2009, I demoted my NX250 to become my street bike. It did the job, but after 5 years of being the main means of transportation, I wanted bit more highway passing capability and ABS for aging hands that were not as sensitive as they had been.

I've had the bike a bit over 3 years. It is too heavy and the front shocks leave much to be desired. I went cheap and installed Hagon fork springs for $100 and am satisfied with the bike (RR now sells just their level 1 front suspension package alone, and that should be a much better solution).

Basically it is a modern UJM. The seating is similar to an enduro or dual sport. The bike will cruise all day at 80 mph, it is fun in the twisties, it runs on regular gasoline so no problems when you get way off of the beaten path, and is reliable.

Doing the valve adjustment is a nasty work as you have to pull the gas tank and an electrical board that is under the tank and above the engine. You want to buy the shop manual if you plan on doing more than minimal basic maintenance. Parts are reasonably inexpensive and dealers are common.

I intend to ride this bike until it becomes too heavy for me to manage comfortably, as I really love it, despite it having been built to a price point. Plus I've averaged 68.9 mpg for over the 15K miles that I have tracked it. I installed iridium spark plugs when I redid the valve shims as I intend to ride it for quite a while. :)


 
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Do you think its worth it to fix the bike no matter what for resale value?

I hate trading in to the dealer. You always get ripped doing that. CBR250 around 2012 go for about 2-2500 around here. I bought mine for 2300 and had I think about 4000 miles on it.
 

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I've heard nothing but good reviews for the new Honda Rebels. Sort of expected, since they're not exactly re-inventing the wheel here and Honda usually has great success with new designs based on proven frames and power plants.
My only complaint is that I think it's butt ugly and the new tank design is a big part of that. Now I see that Yamaha is coming out with a new naked SXR700 that has the same ugly, sloping and elongated tank design as it's SXR900, both of which closely resemble the gas tank design of Honda's Rebels.
I sure hope this isn't a new styling trend. On naked bikes like these where the gas tank is the most prominent design element, if you get it wrong it can result in an entire segment of the bike's potential buyers not being able to see PAST that one unattractive feature, no matter how good the rest of the package is on paper.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Maybe... again depends on the rider. The CBR650F is a much bigger, heavier four cylinder bike, with about 60 more horse power than the 250R. For some it may be no big deal to transition to a 650F. For others it might be too much of a jump, both in terms of performance and size/weight.
I think the size, weight or displacement does not scare me. I've driven all kinds of bikes starting from 25cc, 50.. 80.. 100.. 150.. etc. I would like to transition to a bigger displacement for sure. One thing that I would like is a low seat height since I'm not that tall (5'5"). I turned my face and just walked away without even giving another look at the Africa Twin while I was at the showroom. Thought I would need a ladder or stool to get on it. Why get the embarrassment when its surely not my thing :wink2:. Looks like my taste is towards sports or standard bikes. And the cruisers for its low seat height. If I can tip toe then its fine no matter how big a bike it is.

I thought I would get a super sports after the 250 when I purchased it, but the prices have jumped so high for the super sports. I couldn't believe 1000RR costs nearly 17 grand. Five years ago 600RR costed the same price of what CBR650R costs now. In fact if I remember the dealer was clearing 1000RRs for less than 10 grand when I purchased the 250r. I couldn't believe the inflation in costs. If I knew about this I might have bought a 600RR in the first place (and let it sit and rot :grin2:). With the current prices its not a good value proposition. I'm not desperate for that kind of speed (at that price). I'm desperate for what is sensible.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Do you think its worth it to fix the bike no matter what for resale value?

I hate trading in to the dealer. You always get ripped doing that. CBR250 around 2012 go for about 2-2500 around here. I bought mine for 2300 and had I think about 4000 miles on it.
Time is the problem. I don't want to spend much time fixing it myself or selling it to a private party. I might use that time to make more to buy more toys like this :grin2:. I have to toe the bike to the dealer in either case so thinking why not trade it for a woking motorcycle.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I've heard nothing but good reviews for the new Honda Rebels. Sort of expected, since they're not exactly re-inventing the wheel here and Honda usually has great success with new designs based on proven frames and power plants.
My only complaint is that I think it's butt ugly and the new tank design is a big part of that. Now I see that Yamaha is coming out with a new naked SXR700 that has the same ugly, sloping and elongated tank design as it's SXR900, both of which closely resemble the gas tank design of Honda's Rebels.
I sure hope this isn't a new styling trend. On naked bikes like these where the gas tank is the most prominent design element, if you get it wrong it can result in an entire segment of the bike's potential buyers not being able to see PAST that one unattractive feature, no matter how good the rest of the package is on paper.
I think it is for the same reason (odd tank design) the Rebel caught my eyes. Not sure if it looked ugly to my eyes, but definitely different.
 

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Are these really available in US?
No, but they are available elsewhere (Indonesia mostly, where they are produced) as a 250 twin.

There have been rumors of bumping it to a 300 or 350 for the U.S. market (to compete with the R3, Ninja 300, RC390) but that's just wishful thinking at this point.
 

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... I thought I would get a super sports after the 250 when I purchased it, but the prices have jumped so high for the super sports. I couldn't believe 1000RR costs nearly 17 grand. Five years ago 600RR costed the same price of what CBR650R costs now. In fact if I remember the dealer was clearing 1000RRs for less than 10 grand when I purchased the 250r. I couldn't believe the inflation in costs. If I knew about this I might have bought a 600RR in the first place (and let it sit and rot :grin2:). With the current prices its not a good value proposition. I'm not desperate for that kind of speed (at that price). I'm desperate for what is sensible.
Actually, a 2012 CBR600RRC had a MSRP of $11690 at that time... the 2017 CBR600RRH has an MSRP of $11799. So they really haven't gone up very much in 5 years. The 2017 CBR650F is at $8799 MSRP, so that's still a $3000 difference in price to the 2017 CBR600RRH.

As for non-current models, sure those bikes will sometimes be significantly discounted, particularly if sales for those models & years were "soft". In the case of the CBR600RR back in '10 - '12, those were some fairly tough sales years for that particular model... which caused Honda to at least contemplate discontinuing the 600RR altogether (that was a couple years ago). So, yeah, there were some very low prices back then for brand new, 1 to 2 year old 600RR's... I recall seeing a few non-current 2011 CBR600RR's for about $9500... but to compare those non-current blowout prices of 5 years ago to the MSRP for the current model of the same bike is like comparing apples to oranges.

Something else to keep in mind, is that when a manufacturer discounts new, 1,2, or even 3 year old non-current units, they do so not only to move them off the dealer showrooms, but also because those non-current units have in fact depreciated in value. And we've all seen how the availability of non-currents can affect the used resale value of the same model & year (at least temporarily). It's a fact that motorcycles depreciate in value, even the current model year bikes... the guy who paid $11799 for a 2017 CBR600RRH this past spring, and is now looking to sell that bike will find that the NADA average retail value for his bike is currently at $9360.
 

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bear in mind cbr600rr is made in japan, cbr650 first made in thailand
now made in india.. made as in assembled including indian brakes etc..

must say hplover we had 5 [homeborn] children, 2 delivered by me,
and incl stay-hme-dad for some time, yet still didnt stop me riding
my cb750 either to work and back [thru blue mts nsw aust]
or for general use and simply riding for pleasure..
including taking them as youngsters for careful rides
around the [quiet] block on the tank, which they loved..
[third daughter and both sons motorcyclists]

the only way [imo] is to be 'full time dad' full time,
thru to university or starting work, continuing
in a different role but still as their father,
friend, support and advisor..
ie, fatherhood lasts a lifetime..

riding is like any other coordinated skill,
in that regular practice develops whatever
experience or ability you have..
confidence is good, generally, but should also
include recognition of the need for practice,,
especially daily or regular general riding..

mention this as it seems you havent been riding
much for a couple of years, letting your bike rot..
anyway mate, just a word of caution about
starting again with a larger motorcycle..

the power lies in your right hand, and attitudes,
which might, not be, such a big difference,,
but the extra weight will be a new condition
for brain to re-learn/adapt to, after lighter bikes..

consider making your existing cbr250r roadworthy
again, get up to speed with normal riding skills etc,
then perhaps translate that into a bigger bike...
 
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