Honda CBR 250 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 48 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
What is it about the CBR250R that has you wanting one? For me, being an owner of a Honda CBR1000RR already, I want to keep it in the family and I've always had good luck with Honda products. Not to mention the single cylinder should provide more torque than the Ninja 250, which is what I really want on the streets anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
879 Posts
I think its a great looking bike and a great value. I like having a few different bikes around to ride. I currently have a yamaha F.J.R.1300. and a honda CBR600RR. I think this bike will be light and fun to ride.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
I think its a great looking bike and a great value. I like having a few different bikes around to ride. I currently have a yamaha F.J.R.1300. and a honda CBR600RR. I think this bike will be light and fun to ride.

Especially if you do the normal hop ups -- tires, suspension, intake, exhaust, ECU mods ...

Then it could be genuinely entertaining indeed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
Just what the Dr ordered.

I enjoy lighter, more efficient, small displacement bikes that have just enough acceleration & power to ride anywhere I want, not hold up traffic, & actually blow most of it off. I believe this CBR250r will be just what th Dr ordered, & so did I. I can't wait.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
I enjoy lighter, more efficient, small displacement bikes that have just enough acceleration & power to ride anywhere I want, not hold up traffic, & actually blow most of it off. I believe this CBR250r will be just what th Dr ordered, & so did I. I can't wait.
Same with my reasons.

Instead of having a big 1000cc bike. I rather have a smaller bike with a smaller engine that can be fun. Honda has that!

But some people say the small CC bikes are bikes some get bored of really quickly. I hope the CBR250R isn't like that. Any experienced CBR250R riders wanna give me some hope?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
want new, reliable, gas efficient, sporty-looking bike that won't break the bank on payments. I'm a CBR fan to the core, so this offering will enable me to keep with the CBR line. I'd love a 600RR but i don't need that power, this is going to be my daily driven vehicle, weather permitting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
I'm a newbie to bikes, and still on that learning curve, but is willing to step onto a 250cc bike as a learner, as it goes for ninja's everyyyyyy one has one, so the cbr250 it is :). plus I've had a Honda for awhile!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Honda reliability, gas mileage, isn't a moped, low cost, gas mileage ...... and above all the gas mileage. It should be a fun little bike though, whenever it gets here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
as an intermediate bike. got a litre kawi & a moped aka cubchai. so this quarter litre would fit the gap just nice...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
879 Posts
The Kaw 250 Ninja has always interested me, but after seeing the new CBR with fuel injection I just had to get one. Now i just wish it would show up. Rrrrrr
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
I actually rode a scooter for a summer & had a blast. It blew off cars in the city coming taking off from a start. I'd be 1/2 a block away when they cleared the intersection. Nobody wanted to beat it cause it was just a scooter. I was 50 & didn't give a rip what people thought.

The CBR250 will leave them behind from the light & round the next corner. I face serious temptations when I come up on a string of backed up cars. I know one of these days I'm going to blow around them & be on my way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
As a great learner bike! even when i have a bike i'd be very tempted just to cut through traffic all day everyday! haha
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Mmm

I've always liked how the bigger CBR's look. A mini sport bike with fuel injection and ABS? Sign me up! Now I just need to get up the gumption to learn to ride etc. =P
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
I'm getting one for the racetrack. I race 600s and 1000s, and I've been thinking about racing a smaller bike. I'll be racing against the ninja, and I hope the Honda can compete!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
354 Posts
Hi Everyone. Some body posted here that there are only two kinds of bikes. the ones you like , and the ones you dont like. I believe this. I had an rz350, and did touring and it was great, so I got a venture royal when it was still 1300cc. It had great torque, bags, radio, intercom, everything. it was also very near 800 pounds. After a while it got more like a 2 wheeled motorhome feeling. I did not have that freedom on a motorcycle feeling. I like the smaller bike feeling, and when I get mine I will eventually take it across a few states here in the U.S.

I also used to like to drive the original air cooled VW bug. they were low on power, but comfortable and fun to drive and inexpensive. You have to anticipate hills and passes, and I forsee a little of this with the 250.

I also always thought a ducati bevel drive single would be fun, but parts are hard to find, expensive, and I would rather ride than wrench. So here is a modern 250 single that looks like it can satisfy all of the usability and fun requirements, I am all for it.
One cylinder, 1/4 the maintenance. This bike is overdue. I think it is very limiting to label this a beginners bike. It is obviously a very good choice for beginners, but I have had bikes since 1978. I am offing a honda vtx 1300 right now. I took it a few states ride, and mostly wished I was back on my KLR650. If the cbr was a 400 or 450, that would be more ideal, but 250 is good. I am hoping to get mine in the next week.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
529 Posts
I had an rz350, and did touring and it was great, so I got a venture royal when it was still 1300cc. It had great torque, bags, radio, intercom, everything. it was also very near 800 pounds. After a while it got more like a 2 wheeled motorhome feeling. I did not have that freedom on a motorcycle feeling. I like the smaller bike feeling, and when I get mine I will eventually take it across a few states here in the U.S.

I also used to like to drive the original air cooled VW bug. they were low on power, but comfortable and fun to drive and inexpensive. You have to anticipate hills and passes, and I forsee a little of this with the 250.

I also always thought a ducati bevel drive single would be fun, but parts are hard to find, expensive, and I would rather ride than wrench. So here is a modern 250 single that looks like it can satisfy all of the usability and fun requirements, I am all for it.
One cylinder, 1/4 the maintenance. This bike is overdue. I think it is very limiting to label this a beginners bike. It is obviously a very good choice for beginners, but I have had bikes since 1978. I am offing a honda vtx 1300 right now. I took it a few states ride, and mostly wished I was back on my KLR650. If the cbr was a 400 or 450, that would be more ideal, but 250 is good. I am hoping to get mine in the next week.
I agree completely. I find that small displacement (notice I didn't write "beginner"?) bikes are just more fun to ride. And I'm not the only one. However, there seems to be a social norm that suggests small bikes are "beginner bikes" and in North America there is a tenacious myth that obtaining a big bike is the ultimate end-goal and an "upgrade" from smaller, lighter, better-handling bikes.

I currently own a Yamaha WR250R and a CBR125R. I have toured with the CBR125R. Last summer I did a 3200 KM trip on it. No joke. Loaded with saddlebags, tailbag, and tankbag - camping along the way. Big bike riders said it couldn't be done. I felt that claim needed to be challenged. They were wrong. I had a blast. Travelled on the Trans Canada highway just fine, kept up with traffic, and even passed some of it. Less can be more. Keep it simpler and lighter. I plan to tour on my CBR250R this summer as well.

Here is my trip report with the CBR125R. Complete with photos and details. All 5 pages and 3200kms of it.

Trip Report: 3200 KM Camping Trip - Part I - Honda CBR125R Community Forum

Here is something I wrote on another forum that captures why I want a CBR250R and feel that purchasing a big bike would be a "downgrade" for me. I used the Yamaha R1 to illustrate my point because that is the kind of bike dealers wanted to sell to me, but you could replace "R1" with any large displacement multi-cylinder bike and I believe the meaning of my comment would still hold true. Here it is:

"I might be part of Honda’s demographic. I’m from Canada. I grew up riding dirtbikes and purchased a CBR125R last year as an affordable and fun way of getting back into riding. The interesting thing is that I could have purchased a Yamaha R1 if I had wanted to. Dealers were eager to start me off on one. A “real bike” they said. The problem for me was that a “real bike” could not perform at the level I required. It really all came down to a lack of performance. For instance, it:

1. Was hard to find a new R1 for $2599. It wasn’t up to the task. I was underwhelmed by its cost performance.

2. I really wanted an R1 that weighed 280 lbs wet. It was unable to perform in this area for me. It’s a pig in terms of weight. I was crestfallen by its poor weight performance.

3. I tried desperately to find an R1 that could return 110 mpg (city) and 92 mpg on the highway (These are real figures from my CBR125R by the way – in imperial gallons). The R1 couldn’t offer this kind of fuel economy performance. I was very disappointed.

4. I wanted an R1 that would cost me $250 per year for insurance. Not possible. Once again I was left disillusioned. It simply couldn’t perform in this area either.

5. I wanted a bike that was incredibly flickable and fun in the twisties – with quick turn-in ability. The R1 is too stable and not as flickable. Sure out on the open road the stability of the R1 would be great. But one might as well be driving a Mustang convertible if they enjoy open motoring on straight highways. It’s the turns that make riding fun. Once again the R1’s handling performance left me cold.

6. I wanted a bike that was easy, simple, and cheap to work on. Nothing more simple than a single cylinder engine compared to an inline four. Parts are incredibly affordable too. I actually started to feel bad for the R1 at this point, as it was evident that it lacked many performance attributes that were important. I was completely disheartened.

7. I wanted a bike that I could ride in the city or on the highway and in both settings feel the excitement of extracting all the bike’s grin inducing performance – to feel like a racer – without the threat of losing my licence. To get this kind of fun from the R1 I would have to ride around in 1st gear all the time and even then I would be at risk of losing my licence in the city. And what fun would that be? Not to mention the stress on the bike. Once again, the R1 just couldn’t offer the same level of fun performance. Like it has been said many times – it’s more fun to ride a slow bike “fast” than it is to ride a fast bike “slow”. And perhaps unlike many people who ride large bikes, I actually want to have fun riding.

8. Finally I secretly yearned to be worshipped as a hero by my fellow riders on large bikes. These “seasoned” riders have all at one time asserted that riding a low displacement bike on the highway is unsafe, as the power wouldn’t be there to get out of danger if needed. Wow instant “street cred” right there! They’ve all conceded that they have been (or would be) “scared $hitless” when riding a small bike on the highway not to mention the absolute terror of being blown around in your lane or being blown off the road by tractor trailers. I could simply explain to them that if these bikes were truly unsafe, there would be road statistics to back this up and hefty insurance premiums that aptly addressed this supposed issue. However, I’ve preferred to stay quiet and let them continue to believe that I am a hero – a renegade, maverick rider with boundless courage and better physical conditioning that enables me to ride under conditions that they would be far too afraid to ever attempt or at least ever attempt again.

While it is evident and incontrovertible that the R1 is glaringly lacking in a number of key performance areas – I would definitely consider downgrading to an R1 from my CBR125R if its cornucopia-like list of performance decrements could be addressed, as I’ve heard (anecdotally) that it is a much faster bike. But would it be worth it to get a one-trick pony R1 just to improve on one aspect of performance? I am anxiously awaiting the introduction of the 2012 Yamaha R1. I figure that if Yamaha can knock $10,000 off the MSRP, remove 100 lbs of weight, and double the fuel economy, this might make it competitive enough in terms of performance with the CBR125R that I just might be convinced to ride blue. Otherwise – I’ll just buy a 2011 CBR250R (with ABS and in black please), as it will come much closer to meeting the criteria I’ve outlined above."

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
Very well said. Excellent. Nice way of pointing out that everything is relative. Strange thing when people feel that others must share their same opinion on matters! Thanks for the write up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
It's always more fun to ride a slow bike fast than to ride a fast bike slow. The CBR250 will be a commuter for me, 35 mile round trip to work and back. I still have a '74 Beetle, and an FJ Cruiser. The Beetle only gets 23-24 mpg, the FJ about the same if I tread lightly with it. I can cut my fuel costs by almost two-thirds with the CBR250, and some of the surface streets between work and home are nice, winding, 40 mph-posted roads. My dealer is still saying "end of June", red non-ABS.
 
1 - 20 of 48 Posts
Top