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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone been riding and at some point thought "this wind is going to blow my bike over" and genuinely believed it?

i dont know if its how light the bike is or what, but lately any time im on the highway around 70-75 i take some hard gusts that push me across the lane etc


just curious
 

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Of course, it's a little bike, it gets blown around. But if you are sitting up, then you are like a big sail. I hunker down as the wind blows, always passing big trucks going the other way or overtaking. I ride over to one side if it is real gusty.

It's nothing like my scooter, that thing will make you go side ways when the wind catches it. The guys on the forum, who can really get it around, ride it like a ten speed and finesse it against the wind.

If you are all the way down on the tank, the bike cuts right through the wind. But it you stick out your head or hand or a piece of luggage, it will catch the wind.

When your way down, you can turn the bike just by putting your head in the wind or pushing out your arm a little. I like the way you can lean against the wind when you sit up. After a long while your body goes automatic against the push of the wind, when you really relax and get one with the bike.:)
 

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Of course, it's a little bike, it gets blown around. But if you are sitting up, then you are like a big sail. I hunker down as the wind blows, always passing big trucks going the other way or overtaking. I ride over to one side if it is real gusty.

It's nothing like my scooter, that thing will make you go side ways when the wind catches it. The guys on the forum, who can really get it around, ride it like a ten speed and finesse it against the wind.

If you are all the way down on the tank, the bike cuts right through the wind. But it you stick out your head or hand or a piece of luggage, it will catch the wind.

When your way down, you can turn the bike just by putting your head in the wind or pushing out your arm a little. I like the way you can lean against the wind when you sit up. After a long while your body goes automatic against the push of the wind, when you really relax and get one with the bike.:)
+1 That's my experience as well. If it gets really windy, tuck in, slow down, and stay to the right tire track if the wind it trying to blow you into on-coming traffic. Or better yet - pull off the highway and sit it out until the weather/wind improves. Safe riding is smart riding.

Mike
 

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Even with my Volusia, which is a big heavy bike, it would get blown around. Just one of those things you have to get used to. After awhile it wont phase ya.
 

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yeah.. really vicious winds can be downright scary no matter what bike. I generally slow down in heavy cross winds. I'm not sure if that's the best thing to do but it seems to allow me to control how much counter force to apply. I remember reading some advice about sticking your knee out on the side of the bike that the wind is coming from (I think), but I'm not sure that that helped matters much when I tried it. The scariest incident I've had were vicious side winds going across the I-80 in Utah where the Bonneville Salt Flats are. This was on my (heavy) old FJ1100, leaned over quite a bit just trying to hold a straight line.. I really thought I was going to lose it for a while there..
 

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I guess I take it for granted that in my area it doesnt get that windy. Im sure Ive never had to ride thru any winds like that at the salt flats. That would be scary.
 

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I guess I take it for granted that in my area it doesnt get that windy. Im sure Ive never had to ride thru any winds like that at the salt flats. That would be scary.

I don't live there (thank goodness). I was 'just passing through' at that time. It was getting dark and I still had about 20 miles to go to get shelter across the Nevada border so there was nothing to do but keep going. That night the wind was so bad that the 2-3 story 'Motel 6 sign' failed from metal fatigue at the base and came crashing down into the parking lot with a loud bang. How it managed to miss hitting any cars (and MY bike !) was like a miracle !!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
thx for the replies

for comparison i was riding yesterday along the 6 lane interstate and i was behind someone on a big ol cruiser and i watched as they sat there fixed in one solid position, unfazed by the wind as i was bein blown back in forth through my lane...

i plan on taking some decent trips on this bike but can only imagine how much worse the wind will be crossing some high points in the Appalachias...

i know im still somewhat of a n00b on this but im just curious to see what others think :)
 

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Even with my Volusia, which is a big heavy bike, it would get blown around. Just one of those things you have to get used to. After awhile it wont phase ya.
I come from New Zealand, and wind is something we get a lot of. It is worse in some parts of the country than others. When I started riding on the road I found it very scary, but I got used to it.

When the wind is up a bit you have to look out for places where it is funneled and gusts stronger. Cuttings, valleys, bridges, buildings.... all sorts of places. After a while it becomes part of your normal scanning and anticipating, and you adjust your riding to allow for it.

Where I went to university was in one of the windiest parts of the country. Once I got used to it I came to enjoy riding along in a cross wind, stacked out like on a sail boat on the windiest days. Going too slow would result in getting buffeted around too much. Moderate speed was necessary to stay upright.

In another part of the country very strong warm north-westrly gales can develop and hang around for a day or two (usually followed by a bitterly cold southerly, sometimes with snow). I came to a cutting where the funneled wind was so powerful that it was like hitting a wall. I couldn't ride any further, so I parked the bike to walk to where I was staying, just a couple of km down the road..... but I couldn't even walk for 20 or 30 metres through that cutting. I had to crawl.

Getting home in the norwester is a challenge, but it beats getting caught in the southerly.

You do get used to it, but there are times when it is better to park the bike up and stay home or seek shelter.
 

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My Honda helix's (two) are very scary in heavy winds... while my Yamaha Morphous (250cc scooter) is one of the most stable two wheeled vehicles I've ever owned in calm and windy conditions, very confident! My little 74 cb200 is good in the wind but it's too slow to ride on the highway for more than an exit or two.

We get some viscous wind around here.. If I'm on of the Helixs and it's windy I'll take the long commute to work rather than getting on the highway. If I'm on the Morphous I don't even think about it.
 

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My Honda helix's (two) are very scary in heavy winds... while my Yamaha Morphous (250cc scooter) is one of the most stable two wheeled vehicles I've ever owned in calm and windy conditions, very confident! My little 74 cb200 is good in the wind but it's too slow to ride on the highway for more than an exit or two.

We get some viscous wind around here.. If I'm on of the Helixs and it's windy I'll take the long commute to work rather than getting on the highway. If I'm on the Morphous I don't even think about it.
WTF is a morphous, sounds like some kind of skin disease. i need to see some pics with you on it. Im dyin laughing thinkin about you in the wind on your scooter. Does it fit in your parents basement?
 

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.....................
When the wind is up a bit you have to look out for places where it is funneled and gusts stronger. Cuttings, valleys, bridges, buildings.... all sorts of places. After a while it becomes part of your normal scanning and anticipating, and you adjust your riding to allow for it.
.........................
+1! Great advice!

 

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A little bike is all about fighting the wind, you against the wind. It's so much more interesting and adventuresome than being on a big bike.:D
 

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wind

I've noticed this as well. as this is my first bike, i wondered how typical this is for motorbikes. I had assumed that the light weight of the bike had a lot to do with this wind effect. I also wondered if the riding gear plays into it a bit - i wear a tourmaster flex 2 textile jacket, and wondered if a more streamlined leather jacket would create less drag. any thoughts?
 

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A little bike is all about fighting the wind, you against the wind. It's so much more interesting and adventuresome than being on a big bike.:D
That is so true. In a similar way, a couple of my friends who are pilots fantasize about buying an ultralight so they can fly low and slow again. Why? Because they want to get bounced around - feel challenged again - they yearn to feel the excitement of "true flying" again. To re-experience some raw "seat-of-the-pants - wind in your face - stick and rudder" flying they say. They don't get this sensation anymore from large aircraft.

With that analogy in mind - your wind worries can be re-framed this way: You get to enjoy the excitement and challenge of the raw experience of really truely piloting a motorcycle out on the open road. Many seasoned riders who ride big bikes will admit that what you do on a daily basis would scare the living $hit out of them. So you earn instant respect. And you can tell the others that raz you for riding such a small displacement bike that if their idea of a raw riding experience involves piloting a big cruiser on the highway - they might as well just drive a convertible Mustang (*Hint: replace the word "cage" with Mustang for a really good effect) because it would likely be just as challenging and engaging to drive. :D They could commiserate with my pilot friends.

Mike
 

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After awhile, you will start anticipating gusts - turning in slightly when you pass a truck for instance. However all of the things that make a light motorcycle so much more fun than, say, a 900-pound Gold Wing, make it more susceptible to outside inputs. Wind, pavement grooves, etc.

I've got an old Honda Civic Si with a Tein suspension - this thing is almost as much fun on a twisty road as my bike. However, for long Interstate trips, my wife's Suburban is the ticket. The 250 will work on the Interstate (just like my Si), but you're going to have to pay more attention,
 

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WTF is a morphous, sounds like some kind of skin disease.
You know what would be great?.... some sort of tool which would allow you to input a term and search for specific information .... perhaps even images could be available. It would probably take less than 5 seconds to find out what a Morphous was,... IF we had such a service available to us.

Oh well, we can dream.! :)-You stupid fucking Dolt!-:)http://You%20stupid%20fucking%20Dolt%21%20You%20stupid%20fucking%20Dolt%21%20You%20stupid%20fucking%20Dolt%21%20You%20stupid%20fucking%20Dolt%21
 
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