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Discussion Starter #1
To those of you who've already taken delivery of your CBR and actually read the manual, what is Honda's recommended break-in requirements?
 

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I would like to know this also. I know that guy Redline is all about a "hard" break in, but this is my first break in and I don't want to go against the advice of a genius (people who actually make the honda engines).
 

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Ive only bought 2 new bikes. Just made sure I varied the speed and didnt beat on in to much. Never had any problems.
 

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I would like to know this also. I know that guy Redline is all about a "hard" break in, but this is my first break in and I don't want to go against the advice of a genius (people who actually make the honda engines).
Vary good thinking and I agree. It makes no sence to me to break in any motor hard.
 

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Running-in Period:

During the first 300 miles (500km) of running follow these guidelines to ensure your motorcycle's future reliability and performance.
- Avoid full-throttle starts and rapid acceleration
- Avoid hard braking
- Ride conservatively


That is it, word for word!
 

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yeah, its nothing really... just like any single cylinder they advised not to stay at the same high RPM all the time, but he said all Honda engines are dyno'd before they're shipped
 

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Running-in Period:

During the first 300 miles (500km) of running follow these guidelines to ensure your motorcycle's future reliability and performance.
- Avoid full-throttle starts and rapid acceleration
- Avoid hard braking
- Ride conservatively


That is it, word for word!
Nice to see a bit of simple common sense advice. Followed during, and after those initial miles should assure a reasonable chance of a long economical life for both bike and rider.

Save the hard riding for track days and the like.... after the bike has been run in.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
here is a thread about break-in period or how to break in your bike!

hope it helps

http://www.cbr250.net/forum/cbr250-performance/100-breaking-your-motorbike.html
The article that thread links to has been making the rounds for ages. But as long as *I* am the one paying for the bike, I will follow the advice of the manufacturer. (I've owned about 30 new bikes over the past 10+ years or so. Long story...)

At least Honda has a relatively easy break in process.
 

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don't forget to watch your tires too! They'll have residue from the mold on them still so your traction won't be 100% for at least a few hundred K. Heard many stories of new bikes being dropped because the rider didn't compensate for the reduced traction!
 

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Nice to see a bit of simple common sense advice. Followed during, and after those initial miles should assure a reasonable chance of a long economical life for both bike and rider.

Save the hard riding for track days and the like.... after the bike has been run in.
By the way, that is what honda say in every manual for every bike. :eek:

They cannot even differentiate between a 100cc single cylinder scooter and a 1300cc 4 pot monster.

Crazy!

Shame on you Honda.

But do follow their advice: take it to 2000rpm short of the redline, but not rapidly, just like they say. Then let it engine brake back down thus avoiding hard braking, just like they say. Do this throughout the gears as soon as you've gotten it to running temperature, ie let it warm up then do that the first 20km.

Let it cool down and repeat it a few time.

Failure to do so will likely result in future problems (both physical and performance wise).

Take it out for a nice ride - about 150km. Don't let the engine sit one rpm for long, let it go up to 2000rpm short of the redline and engine brake it down again. DO NOT pansy about at 5000rpm, the engine needs to be ridden.

Change both the oil, and the oil filter after this.

Do not change to synthetic oil until after 4000km or so.

:)

BTW, generally speaking, bikes don't need to be broken in like they did 30 years ago. Engines have come along way since then.
 

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Running-in Period:

During the first 300 miles (500km) of running follow these guidelines to ensure your motorcycle's future reliability and performance.
- Avoid full-throttle starts and rapid acceleration
- Avoid hard braking
- Ride conservatively


That is it, word for word!
BTW you could of course rev it to 12500 rpm, the limit of the redline and still be following Honda's 'recommendations'. :rolleyes:
 

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My dealer did tell me to fluctuate the rpm's and not stay at any "cruising" rpm for too long. I just made sure to stay at a lower gear so I could do this without driving the guy behind me crazy.

From what I've heard if you stay at one RPM for too long, your engine might "favor" that rpm and hiccup a little going past/under it.
 

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don't forget to watch your tires too! They'll have residue from the mold on them still so your traction won't be 100% for at least a few hundred K. Heard many stories of new bikes being dropped because the rider didn't compensate for the reduced traction!
yeah this is something i forgot about but thankfully they reminded me before i left

BTW you could of course rev it to 12500 rpm, the limit of the redline and still be following Honda's 'recommendations'. :rolleyes:
its actually not an issue, just dont do it extended. when they dyno the engines before they depart, they do run them to redline already
 

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By the way, that is what honda say in every manual for every bike. :eek:

They cannot even differentiate between a 100cc single cylinder scooter and a 1300cc 4 pot monster.

Crazy!

Shame on you Honda.

But do follow their advice: take it to 2000rpm short of the redline, but not rapidly, just like they say. Then let it engine brake back down thus avoiding hard braking, just like they say. Do this throughout the gears as soon as you've gotten it to running temperature, ie let it warm up then do that the first 20km.

Let it cool down and repeat it a few time.

Failure to do so will likely result in future problems (both physical and performance wise).

Take it out for a nice ride - about 150km. Don't let the engine sit one rpm for long, let it go up to 2000rpm short of the redline and engine brake it down again. DO NOT pansy about at 5000rpm, the engine needs to be ridden.

Change both the oil, and the oil filter after this.

Do not change to synthetic oil until after 4000km or so.

:)

BTW, generally speaking, bikes don't need to be broken in like they did 30 years ago. Engines have come along way since then.

So the difference between this advice for the 250 and advice for the 1300 inline 4 engine is that if the inline 4 rider takes it to 2000 rpm short of redline, they'll probably kill themselves ?

That said, when I finally get my shiny new 250, there is no way that I'm going to take it up to 8000 rpm in the first tens of miles..
 

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By the way, that is what honda say in every manual for every bike. :eek:

They cannot even differentiate between a 100cc single cylinder scooter and a 1300cc 4 pot monster.

Crazy!

Shame on you Honda.
An engine is an engine. Honda offers simple, common sense, advice that is appropriate for their whole range. If any specific engine had special requirements I am sure Honda would advise accordingly.

As you say, with modern engines the running in process is not as critical as it once was. We can thank modern manufacturing and technology for that.

If a new owner wants to complicate things with all sorts of theories fine, but I would be inclined to go with what a reputable manufacturer recommends.

As calgary250r says, it is not just the engine. Every time I change tyres, chain, brakes or whatever I take things extra carefully for a bit. Learned that one years ago after nearly losing it a couple of km down the road on a new tyre.

In the end few new vehicles are kept to the end of their useful life by the original owner. Most land up in the hands of mugs like myself, and I would say that maintenance has more affect on durability and performance.

I have simply followed manufacturers recommendations, with some variation for operating conditions (again as suggested by manufacturers) and situations. The three Hondas I have owned over the past 26 years (in three countries, I still own two of them) have all done well over 100,000 km. My current every day ride (1997 Honda Dream 100; ex rental) has done 185,000 km.

I had the engine overhauled at about 170,000 km.

How did I run it in? I followed Honda's recommendation. When running in an overhauled Ford TW20 tractor engine I followed the engineer's advice.

Who am I? An ignorant country hick who has done most of my own routine maintenance.
 

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Absolutely follow their recommendations.

What part of their recommendations would I not be following?

Take it up to 2000rpm short of redline and let it engine brake back down. Through-out the gears as best you can. Don't let the engine overheat, stop and let it cool down, then repeat.

Simple really.
 

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That said, when I finally get my shiny new 250, there is no way that I'm going to take it up to 8000 rpm in the first tens of miles..
Do you know anything about breaking in an engine?

For the love of motorbikes read up on the importance of seating the rings.

The main purpose of break-in is to seat the compressionrings to the cylinder.

This is 'breaking in motorcycle engine seating the rings' through google.

Read it.

breaking in motorbike engine seating the rings - Google Search

Failure to properly seat the piston rings to the cylinder wall will result in 'glazing' - combustion gases escaping the combustion chamber. This is not good for the owner of the bike.
 

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I would like to know this also. I know that guy Redline is all about a "hard" break in, but this is my first break in and I don't want to go against the advice of a genius (people who actually make the honda engines).
I totally agree with you - do what Honda says.
As i mentioned before it is actually possible for Honda to see if engine had been run hard - so no warranty.
 
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