Honda CBR 250 Forum banner

21 - 40 of 49 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Hi Steelo, this is one of my personal pet hates too.

My CBR250 is predominately my daily commuter, however I hit the track with it about once a month or so.

I was there last Saturday, sharing a garage with a guy on a speed triple. After the second session, the guy comes up to me and craps on for a while about how impressed he was with how my "lightweight" bike could flick through corners, and what a great move I made on him when I overtook. Then I get the inevitable "You need a bigger bike".

I just smiled and said "yeah" as usual.

So I'm sitting there a while later considering this guy. He's really impressed with me because he's seen a bike with 250 written on it's fairing going around the outside of him dragging a knee and grinding the side stand (I have rear sets) on turn 6, but HE wants to hand out advice.

You know what? Maybe HE should get a SMALLER bike and learn how to turn. Any f#ckwit can go fast down a straight road, but don't judge me by my bikes top speed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,226 Posts
it comes back to what actually is the 'you'
and what really is your 'need'..

you cant 'need' a speed triple if you are
riding around one on your cbr250r..

perhaps he, needs, you to change bikes,,
so as to stop riding around him
on his expensive high hp bike...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I am riding since more than 45 years and got ALL types of bikes, motocross, sport, touting, from 50cc to 1100cc. If you want to stay alive, there is one rule you need to respect: Ride for you, knowing you are invisible for others, and don't go over your own personal limits and over the limits of your bike. Don't try to follow riders too fast for you. You will get at same destination anyway! Enjoy riding on the bike you like (no matter what others think or say) and try to ride with riders with similar pace (riding tempo). My CBR250R REPSOL is not the most powerful bike I own but is among the funniest ! Keep in mind that you better ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Totally agree! It is not the size of the bike you have that matters. It is what you really do with it! A lot of riders like to show off with their big bike but don't really know to 'ride' their machine...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
Hi Steelo, this is one of my personal pet hates too.

My CBR250 is predominately my daily commuter, however I hit the track with it about once a month or so.

I was there last Saturday, sharing a garage with a guy on a speed triple. After the second session, the guy comes up to me and craps on for a while about how impressed he was with how my "lightweight" bike could flick through corners, and what a great move I made on him when I overtook. Then I get the inevitable "You need a bigger bike".

I just smiled and said "yeah" as usual.

So I'm sitting there a while later considering this guy. He's really impressed with me because he's seen a bike with 250 written on it's fairing going around the outside of him dragging a knee and grinding the side stand (I have rear sets) on turn 6, but HE wants to hand out advice.

You know what? Maybe HE should get a SMALLER bike and learn how to turn. Any f#ckwit can go fast down a straight road, but don't judge me by my bikes top speed.
Sounds to me like he may have meant it as a compliment. "You've mastered that 250 of yours, why don't you work on doing the same with a bigger bike?" Not very well put originally but that's how I'd take it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Sounds to me like he may have meant it as a compliment. "You've mastered that 250 of yours, why don't you work on doing the same with a bigger bike?" Not very well put originally but that's how I'd take it.
Yes I think you're right in that he meant well (and I might have been a little harsh in my post!), but the bike/size/power initial personal assessment gets to me sometimes. How many times have I gone through track scrutineering to hear "wow this is the softest front end of the day", without hearing someone say "gee, this must be a pretty comfortable ride on your 15-20,000km per year daily commute to work".

I just wanted to point out also that I was talking about the track days ONLY where I'm trying hard. As per Steelo I do some group rides with either some old work friends or a local Meetup group and sometimes they seem to be on a death wish so I ride at the back at my own pace. Seems to occur more often when women are with us and boys try to impress... The thing is we all end up at the same place for a coffee/lunch/talk stop anyway.

But yes, as someone that's gone under a car before I'm very much aware that on the streets or through the national parks I don't have run-offs, kitty litter, smooth and sticky tarmac, flag marshals or on-site paramedics that I get on the track. It's just very difficult to get that message through to a newer rider that keeps getting told they need a bigger bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
At 6'2" and ~ 210lbs, all of my coworkers gave me trouble about having a too small of a bike and I would get 'bored' with it. I think I put more seat time in during my first year of ownership than some of them had in total.

Ignore them is the only advice I can think of.

The pro's of the 250:

Insurance is cheaper
fuel consumption is less
less expensive to purchase and maintain
no multiple throttle bodies to balance

The con's:
It requires you to be aware due to slower acceleration
It doesn't go over ~95 mph (no triple digit speeding tickets!!)
The seat is uncomfortable after about 170 miles

Having, comparatively, few miles on the road I can't think of a reason to go much bigger.

I plan on "upgrading" to the new CRF250 so I can ride again and potentially try motocamping
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,303 Posts
Totally agree, bajarage. I'm 6' and 225lbs. I'm sure I look a little large on my CBR250R. A 600cc-800cc bike would cure that "problem", but it's just not a "problem" to me. I felt cramped on my Ninja250R, but the ergonomics of the CBR250R don't make it feel like a small bike like the Ninja did. The very small differences in bar and peg heights make a huge difference in comfort and the ability to remain in the saddle for long periods without feeling like you're riding something that's too "small".
I've always loved small displacement bikes and I think the CBR250R "fits" more sizes of riders than any other small bike I've owned. I was really excited about the Yamaha R3 when it came out, but sitting on one at the dealers it instantly became apparent that it didn't fit me at all. It felt even more cramped than the Ninja with the high gas tank and short reach to the bars. I felt like I was sitting "in" it instead of "on" it and there was no way I was going to get used to that feeling.
Every time I consider going bigger, I'm reminded of the incredible advantages of owning a 250. Not only the great mileage and the fact that I never feel guilty on nice days for not riding it as I probably would if I owned a $12000 bike, but I just got my 2017 insurance bill and it's only $87.95 for the year!
95% of my riding is rural back roads where I'm the only vehicle in sight for miles on end. I don't think the cows and horses I pass notice that I might appear a little large for the bike I'm riding. As long as I'm perfectly comfortable in the cockpit and have absolutely nothing indicating to ME that I'm riding a bike that may appear smaller than optimum, I could give a rat's ass if someone else thinks that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
I have to be honest though, I have made joking jabs at a coworker for his choice in a small bike, naturally as it was parked next to my CBR.

Imagine a 6'3" 220 lbs moderately lanky individual riding a Grom. It was a good laugh, but he was getting WAY better mileage than I was and I got WAY better mileage than his truck.

I think his truck was getting around 16mpg I was getting around 65 mpg and he said he was around 105mpg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Not so much aggressive just a couple of hills on the freeway and not wanting to get run over. Best mileage I ever got was 83 ish worst was 55, which was trying to keep up with traffic @ 70-75 mph without being in full tuck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
Like all the comments on this thread. I too have had larger displacement bikes. Currently my two sons both have larger disp bikes! Me, I've always gravitated to the thumpers and smaller disp bikes. Don't know why really, except with the CBR250 I LOVE the low cost of ownership. Maintenance is easy. And riding it, the most important thing IMO, is a blast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
I have bigger bikes so I can't talk too much. I have my "Dragon" in the an FZ1 and my Commuter in a DL650. I have an XV250 in the garage as well (gets 90mpg and killed a deer for me too!) for the jaunts into town.

However, when I think of a pure fun bike to ride, I think of the CBR250. Is it fun for interstate trips? Depends. I took mine down US250 from OH to VA and loved it. Going back on the interstate not so much. I would still use the CBR for my commute if my daughter had not confiscated it for herself. The suspension could use some work, but it works. The power isn't too bad either for what it is.

I would maybe if you do a ton of interstate riding consider a bigger bike, but I would never get rid of your little 250!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
As an interstate bike it might be a little weak, but still doable,in my opinion. However, if I was to ride one long distance again I would definitely get a different seat. The factory seat is a bit uncomfortable at 170 miles let alone longer distances.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,226 Posts
honda make - many - vehicles of all shapes
sizes and functions, from ride on mowers
to rescue watercraft to personal jets..
honda make all sorts of motorcycles
suitable for any and all purposes..
from australian postie bikes
to the finest champion motogp
and other high level race bikes..

for road bikes honda has a similarly
impressive lineup.. theres a motorcycle
for - anything and everything -
including those who need, support
for low self esteem.. the status symbol,
and that sort of thing..

which is fine,, one day they will probably
wake up to themselves, and stop calling
250 etc bikes 'girls bikes' and so on..

so just say 'thanks mate!'
and just ride away into
your own world..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
250 cc bikes are extremely rare where I live. The classic way in the region where I live is, most young guys start with 500 cc motorbikes and then upgrade pretty fast to a 600 cc bike and those who survive this ride a 1000 cc bike a few years later and then quit riding when they have kids.

A lot of motorcycle riders are so naive they buy a brand new bike and sell it only a few days or weeks later because they feel like this has way to less power, this is no joke. When I bought my CBR 250 with only 2500 kilometers on it, which is like 1500 miles it was one and a half year old and had three previous owner :grin2:

I don't have many friends to ride with but from trips and comuting I know the problem very well. The first thing many riders ask me instantly: "how come you're riding only a 250?" and believe it or not some of them even have a disgusted face expression while aksing me this.
Most of the time I reply it's enough for my style of riding and it's a lot more fun to ride fast on a slow bike than to ride slow with a fast bike :grin2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,226 Posts
my cbr250r was also a bargain, under 600km,
came with shark helmet and alpine stars leather[!]
not a mark on it..

he reckoned; 'it wasnt fun riding alone'..

could have switched his mind back on
but self interest held the day..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
It's a strange debate that never really goes away in the motorcycle world. I'm limited in experience but can't remember how many "is a 250 enough?" Threads I've seen.

It probably wouldn't be fun to be on I-5 trying to keep an 80mph pace for hours on end but that's not what it's made for.

It's also my feeling that you can more easily develop on a machine where you can test its limits. I suspect many riders who own super sports are not capable of using them to their full potential; They are street legal bikes that were also designed to be used on the track.

As long as I find myself being sloppy at times or making mistakes I really don't have a desire to upgrade to a powerful machine.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 
21 - 40 of 49 Posts
Top